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The Nature of Things Stay-at-Home Animal Dads

There are some unsung heroes in the animal kingdom: fathers who fly solo after moms leave them behind with the kids. Why do these devoted dads raise their young all by themselves? Scientists are just beginning to uncover the answers to this evolutionary mystery.
  • 2018
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/15/2019

The Nature of Things The Power of Play

From youngsters fooling around to adults having a laugh, playing is a fact of human life. But new findings in animal behaviour show us that play is no laughing matter — in fact, it's key to survival. And it’s not just people and pets that play, but reptiles, amphibians and insects, too.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The Nature of Things Laughing and Crying

“Ha ha,” “hee hee,” “boo hoo,” “waaa, waaa”... the unmistakable sounds of laughing and crying are recognizable all over the world. They’re pillars of human communication, yet some researchers say that when it comes to studying human behaviour, there’s nothing as poorly understood as laughs and tears. Why did we develop these unusual vocal communication techniques? How uniquely human are ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The Nature of Things Aging in the Wild

Are the keys to healthy aging hiding in the DNA of animals? Go on a journey around the globe to meet the world's animal elders and discover their secrets to longevity.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The Nature of Things Turtle Beach

Every year hundreds of thousands of sea turtles come to lay eggs on a single beach in Costa Rica. Scientists are exploring the extraordinary mass nesting behaviour of the olive ridley sea turtle, revealing the hidden world inside the turtle nest.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The Nature of Things Remarkable Rabbits

They are adorable and live on almost every continent, but they rarely get the respect they deserve. Rabbits and hares are far more fascinating than you ever imagined.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/12/2019

The National 'Extinction crisis' has scientists sounding the alarm over nature's rapid decline

Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over one million species of plants and animals. That's according to a United Nations report on biodiversity that says humans are the main culprit in this rapid decline.
  • 2019
  • 00:01:50
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

Scout & The Gumboot Kids The Case of the Wooden Timekeeper

While on his walk, Scout discovers something in nature that can tell us how old it is. What could it be?
  • 2017
  • 00:05:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

Scout & The Gumboot Kids The Case of the Vanishing Caterpillar

When Scout misplaces his caterpillar friend, it’s up to the Gumboot Kids to put the clues together and find him again.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 05/27/2019

Scout & The Gumboot Kids The Case of the Growing Bird Feeder

Scout sends the Gumboot Kids to a garden to find a bird feeder that grows as he waters it.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 05/27/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Polar Bears: A Species in Peril

Polar bears have long been a Canadian icon. They live in colder northern climates and hunt for seals. But the climate is changing and the earth is warming. As a result, polar bear numbers are in decline. As the sea ice recedes, the bears lose places to hunt and are stuck ashore, often starving. And their birth rates are declining. ...
  • 2019
  • 00:12:57
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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The National How science says drawing will help you retain information better

It's been said that "a picture is worth a thousand words," and this might be more true than we realize, especially when it comes to our thinking and memory.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/11/2019

The National Saving Winnipeg's urban forest

A triple threat of pests have put the trees in Winnipeg’s urban forest at risk. The city has implemented a pest control program to help ward off the Dutch elm disease, emerald ash borer and jumping tree lice that are decimating the forest. 
  • 2018
  • 00:02:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

CBC News West Island's fight to save ash trees heats up

The emerald ash borer has been destroying ash trees across southern Quebec for years. Some West Island municipalities say they’re having some success in their fight against the beetle.
  • 2015
  • 00:02:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/28/2018

The Nature of Things The Genetic Revolution

Trailblazing scientists are making ground-breaking discoveries in the rapidly evolving world of genetic engineering. Technologies like CRISPR are making it possible to quickly and cheaply change the DNA of all living things, including humans. Today, genes can be edited almost as easily as words on a computer screen. This new ability to alter our DNA holds the promise of curing ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

CBC News The emerald ash borer threatens thousands of Montreal trees

The emerald ash borer is a shiny green bug that could kill hundreds of thousands of trees in Montreal. Chris Buddle is a professor at McGill University and Sylvain Ouellet is a city councillor with Projet Montréal. They spoke to Shawn about their concerns.
  • 2014
  • 00:09:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

The Nature of Things Spying on Animals

Spying on Animals shows us how innovations in remote, unmanned cameras let us bear witness to animal behaviour 24/7, almost anywhere on Earth. This is a revolution for scientists, a new and powerful connection between ourselves and wildlife, and an inspirational force for conservation.
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018

The Nature of Things Equus: Story of the Horse — Chasing the Wind

In Episode 3 of Equus: The Story of the Horse, anthropologist turned filmmaker Niobe Thompson introduces viewers to some of the most fascinating and unlikely of the world’s 400 horse breeds. He meets the Yakutian, at home in the coldest inhabited place on Earth (Siberia). He meets the Arab, a spirited horse at home on the scorching sands of the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/09/2018

The National Scientists develop patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli

Scientists at McMaster University are developing a transparent patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Man-Made Extinction: Canada's Disappearing Caribou Herds

Its image adorns our Canadian 25-cent coin — the magnificent Canadian caribou. It once roamed this country abundantly. Now the woodland caribou is listed as an at-risk species, and southern mountain caribou herds in B.C.'s Southern Interior are especially vulnerable. Although the causes of the decline are varied, it cannot be ignored that much of the blame is due to ...
  • 2018
  • 00:09:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

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The National Canada's falcon population back from brink of extinction

The peregrine falcon was once on the brink of extinction. Now, the bird is actually making a comeback thanks in large part to one Alberta man who not only helped the species recover, but has bred an industry in the process.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:30
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

The Nature of Things Equus: Story of the Horse — First Riders

The domestication of the horse has been a mystery of science for generations. In Episode 2 of Equus, First Riders, anthropologist turned filmmaker Niobe Thompson travels to Kazakhstan to witness the groundbreaking discovery of a skeleton from the earliest culture ever to tame horses. In this episode, viewers get a set of genuine science scoops: we are the first to learn that ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/01/2018

The Nature of Things Equus: Story of the Horse — Origins

We built the world around us with horsepower. But what is it that makes humans and horses so perfect for each other? The three-part series Equus takes viewers on an epic journey across three continents and back in time to the mysterious beginnings of the horse-human relationship. In Episode 1, we go back 45 million years to meet a tiny, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:44:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/01/2018

The National Right whale deaths due in part to abundance of food

Scientists were able to track the whales' movements, as well as the plankton they feed on, using little robots. Now their focus is on why the whales' food is suddenly so abundant in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and what role climate change has played.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:30
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2018

The National California wildfires impact marine life

The Thomas wildfire in California that destroyed more than 1,000 structures late last year also affected marine life. CBC’s Kim Brunhuber looks at how the fires had an impact on life in the Pacific Ocean.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018