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The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The Nature of Things The Genetic Revolution

Trailblazing scientists are making ground-breaking discoveries in the rapidly evolving world of genetic engineering. Technologies like CRISPR are making it possible to quickly and cheaply change the DNA of all living things, including humans. Today, genes can be edited almost as easily as words on a computer screen. This new ability to alter our DNA holds the promise of curing ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

The National Choosing death earlier than planned

A Nova Scotia woman who has chosen a medically assisted death says Canada's new law is too extreme and unfair. She says she's now forced to make the difficult choice to end her life earlier than she'd like.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Parenting in Canada: The struggle of surrogacy and in vitro fertilization

The National looks at the struggles prospective Canadian parents face with both options.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/12/2018

The National Revenge porn victimizes police officer

Revenge porn's latest victim is a young Canadian police officer who is coming forward after images she shared with another officer were made public. Brittany Roque believed the photos had been destroyed, but two years later they were sent to a potential employer. Roque has launched a civil suit that will test a new Manitoba law that helps victims of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Stopping killer robots before they get to us first

Stopping killer robots before they get to us first sounds like fiction, but experts fear they could be a reality in the very near future. This month, governments convened in Geneva at the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons to discuss concerns over lethal autonomous weapons systems, also known as “killer robots.” The National takes a look at the advancements in technology, what ...
  • 2018
  • 00:05:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

Small Talk Friendship

This Small Talk episode looks at the power of relationships and what makes someone a friend.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:29
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 01/24/2018

The National ViewPoint | Self-driving cars and moral dilemmas

Self-driving cars must be programmed to consider moral dilemmas, reports technology futurist and researcher Jesse Hirsh. These robots on wheels will doubtlessly face scenarios where human life will be at risk, so among other considerations, Jesse argues that car companies will need to allow transparency around programming cars for moral decisions.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/28/2017

Small Talk Goodness

This episode of Small Talk looks at the idea of morality, more specifically the importance of being a good person and why it’s important to be one.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:20
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/20/2017

Small Talk Mistakes

This episode of Small Talk looks at the role that making mistakes in one’s life plays, how we can learn from them and the importance of making them.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:05
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/20/2017

Small Talk Life

This Small Talk episode explores the meaning of life, how to live one that is fulfilling and what that means.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:26
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/20/2017

The Fifth Estate Lac Megantic Rail Disaster: The Case Runner

In July 2013, a runaway train with more than seven million litres of volatile crude oil crashed in a small Quebec town, leaving part of Lac Megantic incinerated and 47 people dead. Soon after the crash – when many bodies were still being identified – lawyers from the United States turned up in town, offering to help families fight for ...
  • 2017
  • 00:20:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/17/2017

Dot. The Holiday Tree

Dot is horrified to discover she’s accidentally gotten rid of all the decorations for the town tree; she works round the clock to make new ones and discovers the joy that comes with giving and sharing.
  • 2016
  • 00:11:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/08/2017

News in Review - October 1996 Human Reproduction: Redefining Life

Technology and the control over human reproduction is the point of departure for examining the related controversial social and ethical issues.
  • 1996
  • 00:14:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/04/2017

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The Nature of Things My Brain Made Me Do It

When a brutal crime is committed who is ultimately to blame – the perpetrator or their brain? Neuroscientists are generating ground breaking research that sheds light on why some people can’t stop themselves from committing harmful or criminal acts. This is creating new challenges for the justice system and making us re-evaluate the way we sentence, punish and rehabilitate people ...
  • 2016
  • 00:44:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/04/2016

Documentary Silent Majority: Beyond the Movie

This documentary takes a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Silent Majority, a film based on the true story of Adam Tanguay, a young man who was bullied at primary school, high school, and even later at his workplace. The documentary features a Q&A session with the film’s actors sharing their views on bullying.
  • 2015
  • 00:10:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/14/2016

Feature Film Silent Majority

Silent Majority is based on the true story of Adam Tanguay, a young man who was bullied at primary school, high school, and even later at his workplace. The film highlights the emotions felt by the victim, aggressors and witnesses in a context of bullying that occurred over a period of one year in school. The specific objective is to empower ...
  • 2015
  • 00:40:40
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 01/14/2016

The Fifth Estate The Pain Game: Drugs, Doctors and Pro Sports Classroom Favourites

It's no secret that professional sports is big business, but as this investigation by The Fifth Estate reveals, the pressures put on some team doctors to nurse high-priced star players back to health is leading to the over-prescription of drugs and ultimately harming the athletes.
  • 2015
  • 00:41:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2015

News in Review - December 2005 Gomery Report: Anatomy Of A Scandal

In early November, Justice John Gomery tabled his report on the so-called sponsorship scandal. The sponsorship program was created by Prime Minister Jean Chrtien's Liberal government just after the 1995 Quebec referendum. It was supposed to promote national unity. Instead hundreds of millions of dollars were wasted on kickbacks and corruption. In this News in Review story, we'll look at ...
  • 2005
  • 00:16:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/01/2015

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News in Review - April 2015 ​B.C. Wolf Cull: Saving Endangered Caribou?

In early 2015, British Columbia launched a controversial five-year cull of the province's wolf population in order to preserve endangered herds of mountain caribou. Animal experts call it cruel, environmentalists say culls don't work, and many agree humans are the real culprit in the caribou decline. Just how far should we go to preserve one species?
  • 2015
  • 00:10:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/15/2015

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Dragons' Den Dragons' Den, Season 9, Episode 13

One entrepreneur thinks he has the right skills to be an industry ringleader; a Dragon gets burned by a flashy product causing the other Dragons to breathe fire; and one product’s outlawed origins underpin the ethical approach these entrepreneurs take. Plus, a green product has two Dragons seeing red. Pitches in this episode: Vancouver Circus School; The Elements of Innovation; StashBelt; Part Time Pooch; The Greenlid.
  • 2015
  • 00:42:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/23/2015

News in Review - March 2015 ​Drones: Military or Mainstream?

So, are drones a toy or a weapon? It turns out they're both. A few years back they entered our consciousness as a weapon of war but their use has rapidly expanded. Multiple industries employ them to search hard to reach places, while hobbyists are eager to get a bird's eye view of just about anything. But as with many ...
  • 2015
  • 00:15:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/17/2015

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The National White Privilege: Does It Exist?

Recent U.S. grand jury decisions not to indict white police officers for killing black men Michael Brown and Eric Garner have sparked outrage and protest. They've also brought to the fore questions about the difference between how whites and minorities are treated. The National assembles a panel of political commentators who try to parse some difficult questions. Is white privilege ...
  • 2014
  • 00:13:38
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/22/2014

News in Review - March 1994 Figure Skating: Winning At Any Price

The Tonya Harding-Nancy Kerrigan story is the point of departure for looking at the pressures of amateur sport in a multi-million dollar sports world.
  • 1994
  • 00:11:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/10/2014

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News in Review - May 1997 The Bre-X Gold Find: All That Glitters

Was the gold discovery of the century more myth than fact? This cautionary tale for Canadian investors examines how people can buy into something that sounds too good to be true.
  • 1997
  • 00:15:50
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/25/2014

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