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The National Canadians, politicians targeted by foreign interference, electronic spy agency says

Canadians are vulnerable to foreign interference in this fall's federal election — and the meddling is already underway, according to a new report from the federal electronic spy agency, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC).
  • 2019
  • 00:03:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Cellphone ban coming to Ontario classrooms

Cellphones will be banned in Ontario classrooms starting at the beginning of next school year, but questions remain about how the ban will be enforced.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Huawei Arrest: Canada Caught in a Political Tug of War

The arrest of a top executive from Chinese company Huawei has placed Canada in the middle of a political tug of war. In December 2018, Canadian authorities detained Meng Wanzhou at the Vancouver airport at the request of U.S. law officials. Meng is the daughter of the founder of Huawei, the largest technical communications company in the world. She remains ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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The National Can a law really stop fake news?

India, the world's biggest democracy, heads to the polls in just a few months. It's a country where fake news has actually killed people, something the government is looking to stop by making the dissemination of fake news against the law. But can a law actually stop fake news?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National The U.K. could ban social media sites in the wake of teen's death

The suicide of a young girl in the U.K. is prompting a heated debate about the responsibility of social media sites to remove harmful content. Her family says she had been viewing disturbing content about self harm on Instagram and Pinterest. Now the British government is considering banning certain platforms if companies don't comply.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Not your average tech company: What is Huawei and why it matters

Meng Wanzhou, deputy chair and CFO for the Chinese tech giant Huawei, is reportedly wanted by the United States for allegedly contravening U.S. trade sanctions against Iran. This, however, isn't the first time the tech giant has been under scrutiny internationally for its close ties to the Chinese government.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National How some online shopping habits are terrible for the environment

What can be a convenient click away could drastically expand the carbon footprint of an online sale.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/07/2019

The National Tracking bots in the lead-up to the U.S. midterms

Various sites, apps and dashboards have been created to track everything from fake accounts to hashtag hijacking in the lead-up to the U.S. midterms. In this dispatch from Wilkes-Barre, Penn., Steven D'Souza looks at the role social media and fake news will play in this November’s elections, and meets the people being tasked with tackling the problem.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

News in Review - November 2018 Censoring Online Information: The Right to be Forgotten

The internet is a tool for accessing information about others. But once online, those stories live on forever. False or incorrect reports about individuals online can tarnish reputations, damage families and upturn careers. Some countries have legislation to help with that. It’s called the right to be forgotten. But Canada doesn’t have this legislation. And it’s got some people calling ...
  • 2018
  • 00:12:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/29/2018

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The National Social media, Saudi Arabia and spyware

An activist from Saudi Arabia sought refuge in Canada after making critical comments on social media. Omar Abdulaziz thought he was safe until he received a text message that put spyware on his cellphone.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Safeguarding Social Media: Facebook's Challenge

Facebook has been the shooting star of social media platforms. Nothing could stop its meteoric rise as two billion users signed up to communicate and share online. But recent scandals from fake news to extremist content have plagued the firm and users are losing trust. If the firm cannot secure personal information and stop hackers, how can users feel safe? ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/16/2018

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The National Doctors want Canadians' medical records to be more accessible

Doctors want Canadians' medical records to be more accessible, via so-called patient portals. The online portal allows patients and authorized users to access their medical history — including blood tests, X-rays, scans and medications.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/12/2018

The National Brexit and U.S. political strategies creep into Canada

Brexit and U.S. political strategies are creeping into Canada via micro-targeting, which delivers tailored messages to specific people who are inclined to react.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

The National An Internet free from corporate greed

NYCMesh is a group dedicated to establishing an Internet free from corporate dominance in New York, but can they realistically stand up to the big Internet service providers? Its members set up antennas on rooftops around the city to create a spider web of connections. CBC News got a look at how the underground network is building its own Internet.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Canadian tech used in repressive countries for censorship

Canadian company Netsweeper is under fire for its technology that can help repressive countries around the world censor the Internet for millions of users. The technology was born as a tool to help schools and libraries protect vulnerable users — now it's being sold and implemented at the network level in countries with dubious human rights records.
  • 2018
  • 00:11:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Revenge porn victimizes police officer

Revenge porn's latest victim is a young Canadian police officer who is coming forward after images she shared with another officer were made public. Brittany Roque believed the photos had been destroyed, but two years later they were sent to a potential employer. Roque has launched a civil suit that will test a new Manitoba law that helps victims of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The Weekly Zeynep Tufekci on Facebook's business model

Socio-technologist Zeynep Tufekci says Facebook’s business model is problematic. She tells the CBC’s Wendy Mesley that your data can be used to identify your politics and your personal weaknesses – even if you have never disclosed it.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018

CBC News Alert Ready to send emergency messages to smartphones

Alert Ready, the national emergency system that already sends alerts to television and radio, will soon be sending them to mobile phones too.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/16/2018

The National Canadians pay big fees for Internet — so why don't they switch companies?

Canadians pay some of the biggest fees for Internet service, and Canada's big telecommunication companies are raising their prices — so why don't Canadians switch to other companies? There are many alternatives to Bell, Rogers and Telus, but consumers seem reluctant to switch. CBC News takes a look at why Canadians continue to pay huge fees even as they complain ...
  • 2018
  • 00:05:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

The National What is a 5G network and how can it change your life?

5G cellular networks — the next step up from 4G — are being developed for testing in some cities but won't be fully functional until 2020. It's touted as being 100 times faster than 4G, but while 5G's benefits have the potential to change the way cities work, implementing it could prove to be quite costly.
  • 2018
  • 00:07:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2018

The National Researching the spread of fake news and its impact

Researching the spread of fake news and its impact was the focus of a new report from MIT researchers on how rumours can spread faster and farther than the truth. Perhaps one of the more surprising findings is the suggestion that humans are a bigger issue in the spread of fake news than the bots that often get blamed.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/28/2018

The National Infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time

A small army of activists in Halifax is infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time. It's all about getting tiny pieces of information into a country that tries to shelter its population from the outside world. Students at Dalhousie University are making videos of life in Halifax and putting them on the USB drives. They are they sent ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2018

The National Internet in South Korea a model for Canada

Internet access in South Korea is the fastest in the world and could be a model for Canada to follow. But a few obstacles stand in Canada's way — namely, a lack of competition that is keeping the Internet from improving.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2018

Marketplace Addicted to your phone?

Are you addicted to your smartphone? Companies are using science and artificial intelligence to keep you hooked, but tech insiders reveal to the Marketplace team how you can curb the urge to constantly stay connected. Plus they track a family's device usage over several months and reveal the staggering results — from the eight-year-old son, the teenage daughters to the parents. And ...
  • 2017
  • 00:22:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/15/2018

News in Review - January 2018 #MeToo: How a Hashtag Launched a Revolution

The #MeToo Campaign of 2017 could well be the most important movement of a generation. The hashtag took off in October and allowed victims of sexual harassment all over the world to unite on social media. It started with stunning revelations about film mogul Harvey Weinstein and grew into a global movement. The bravery of these women sharing their stories ...
  • 2018
  • 00:17:57
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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