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The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: David Chariandy on getting into your character's head

Novelist David Chariandy (Brother) delves into his writing process, how he gets into a character's head and the importance of the question "what if."
  • 2019
  • 00:02:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: Reading of 2018 winner (Grades 7 to 9) – The Universe's Greatest Love Story by Cynthia Gan

Cynthia Gan, 14, won the Grades 7 to 9 category of the 2018 Shakespeare Selfie student writing challenge. Her poem on the total solar eclipse of 2017 was inspired by the star cross'd lovers and written from the perspective of Friar Laurence from Romeo & Juliet. Gan attends Richmond Christian Secondary School in Richmond, B.C. The text of her poem can ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:43
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

CBC News Bernie Francis reads "In Flanders Fields" in Mi'kmaq

For Remembrance Day, Mi'kmaw linguist Bernie Francis reads his translation of John McCrae's war poem "In Flanders Fields."
  • 2017
  • 00:01:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

The National How changing language could help in the fight against opioids

If you had any doubt about whether Canada's opioid crisis was getting better or worse, the latest numbers tell a big part of that story: it's still out of control. More than 9,000 people died between January 2016 and June 2018. There's a lot of talk about how to turn things around, but there may be another side to it ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/11/2019

CBC Books Canada Reads 2019: Lindsay Wong on The Woo-Woo

In this video Lindsay Wong discusses The Woo-Woo, her dark, witty and touching memoir that gives an honest account of the impact of mental illness on her family. The Vancouver-based writer delivers a raw and emotional look at whispered secrets, dysfunctional relationships — and how her grandmother, mother, aunt and even herself initially blamed the mythical "woo-woo," Chinese spirits that plague ...
  • 2019
  • 00:03:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/27/2019

CBC Books Canada Reads 2019: Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette on Suzanne

In this video Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette discusses Suzanne, an English translation of her celebrated 2015 novel La femme qui fuit. Barbeau-Lavalette’s novel is an imagined account of the life of her estranged grandmother. A novel that blurs the lines between fact and fiction, Suzanne tells the story of more than eight decades of art and political history through its portrait of a conflicted woman and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:05:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/27/2019

CBC Books Canada Reads 2019: Max Eisen on By Chance Alone

In this video Max Eisen discusses his deeply moving memoir By Chance Alone. When Eisen was 15 years old he and his family were taken from their home to Auschwitz, where he worked as a slave labourer. He survived the Holocaust and emigrated to Canada in 1949. Eisen has toured the world, educating people about the horrors he survived during the ...
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/27/2019

CBC Books Canada Reads 2019: David Chariandy on Brother

In this video David Chariandy discusses Brother, his novel which takes us inside the lives of the mixed heritage sons of Trinidadian immigrants. Rooted in Chariandy's own experience growing up as a person of colour in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, the novel is a beautiful meditation on discrimination, agency, grief and the power of human relationships.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/27/2019

CBC Books Canada Reads 2019: Abu Bakr al Rabeeah and Winnie Yeung on Homes

In this video Abu Bakr al Rabeeah and Winnie Yeung discuss Homes, a memoir of al Rabeeah's childhood in Iraq and Syria. Just before civil war broke out, al Rabeeah's family left Iraq for safety in Homs, Syria. Al Rabeeah was 10 years old when the violence began in his new home. He remembers attacks on his mosque and school, car bombings ...
  • 2019
  • 00:06:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/27/2019

The National The resurgence of poetry through a modern medium

Poetry is having a huge surge, largely through the growing popularity of so-called "Insta-poets." These young writers built their audience using Instagram, and have now drifted into the world of celebrity, gracing the front rows of fashion shows and getting celebrity endorsements.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Using artificial intelligence to help you learn a new language

If you've ever tried learning a new language, you know how hard it is just to get the basics down, never mind holding a real conversation. A group of Toronto researchers is trying to change that by using a smartphone application with artificial intelligence that can even understand bad accents.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

CBC Books The First Page: Performance of 2017 winner (Grades 7 to 9) – Nameless by Sari Warshawsky

Hear the 2017 winning entry for The First Page student writing challenge in the Grades 7 to 9 category. The winning author, Sari Warshawsky, is a student at Royal West Academy in Montreal, QC. Sari's piece entitled Nameless tackles the pressure of perfection in a virtual world. It's performed by actor Nicole Volossetski. For the 2017 First Page writing challenge, over ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/19/2018

CBC Books The First Page: Omar El Akkad

Author Omar El Akkad reads the first page from American War, his debut novel that was featured in Canada Reads in 2018. He suggests that what writers hold back from the reader in the opening pages is just as important as what they include. Download the First Page teacher guide for discussion questions on Omar's novel, key concepts to writing ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:10
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/19/2018

CBC Books The First Page: Jennifer Chen

Jennifer Chen reads the first page from her debut YA novel, Super, and talks about the importance of not only finding a great hook, but building on the intrigue of the hook. Download the First Page teacher guide for discussion questions on Jennifer's novel, key concepts to writing a compelling first page and more.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:39
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/19/2018

The National Trump, #MeToo and Times Up movements change romance

The romance novel genre is a billion-dollar industry in the U.S. and there's a big shift happening, as writers empower the female characters in their stories.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2018

Unreserved Speaking Ojibwe an 'act of defiance' says 19-year-old language teacher

Aandeg Muldrew, 19, is the University of Manitoba's youngest sessional instructor, teaching introductory Ojibwe. Muldrew, who lives in Winnipeg, started learning the language from his grandmother when he was 10. Given the history of languages lost after colonization and residential schools, speaking the language is "almost like an act of defiance," he says. Speaking Ojibwe is a way of "reconciling ...
  • 2018
  • 00:08:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

CBC Radio One More than Words

More than Words is a set of stories that looks at why Indigenous languages matter. These stories introduce people determined to reawaken the many languages across the country. Produced in partnership with the Reporting in Indigenous Communities course at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.
  • 2018
  • 00:49:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

On the Coast Khelsilem on Indigenous language funding

Dustin Rivers — also know as Khelsilem — says additional funding for Indigenous language revitalization is a good move by the B.C. government. Khelsilem is a councillor with the Squamish First Nation and a lecturer in Indigenous Languages at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby. He is also the man behind a language immersion program offered by SFU that teaches Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh ...
  • 2018
  • 00:07:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/06/2018

CBC News #Beyond94 – Why language is vital for this Inuk residential school survivor

Inuk residential school survivor Jack Anawak once fired back at a fellow MP who criticized his speaking Inuktitut in the House of Commons.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/18/2018

CBC News #Beyond94 – Visit this Mi'kmaq immersion school in Nova Scotia

Eskasoni, Nova Scotia is taking steps to preserve its Indigenous language among the next generation.
  • 2018
  • 00:10:50
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/18/2018

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: Current affairs in fiction with Sharon Bala​​

Novelist Sharon Bala shares what sparked her to write about the recent experiences of Tamil refugees. For students working on their entries for CBC Books' Shakespeare Selfie youth writing challenge, Sharon's advice will inspire them to search for real-life details when depicting current events through fiction.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/21/2018

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: Performance of 2017 winner (Grades 7 to 9) – That Something Wicked by Ali Nelson

Actress Bahareh Yaraghi performs the winning entry from the 2017 Shakespeare Selfie student writing challenge, Grades 7 to 9 category. "That Something Wicked" was written by Ali Nelson, who attends Abbey Park High School in Oakville, Ont. She wrote about the Syrian Civil War from the perspective of Macbeth's First Weird Sister.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/21/2018

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: Kristin Kreuk on elements of a great monologue

Kristin Kreuk (The Burden of Truth, Smallville) talks about what makes a monologue powerful from her perspective as an actor. Learning how she prepares for a performance and what makes the material easy to work with may help students prepare for CBC Books' Shakespeare Selfie student writing challenge.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/21/2018

CBC Books Shakespeare Selfie: An introduction to Shakespeare with Kenneth Oppel and Philippa Sheppard

Why does the work of Shakespeare continue to be relevant? Kenneth Oppel, author and judge for CBC Books' Shakespeare Selfie 2018 student writing challenge, and Philippa Sheppard, English professor at the University of Toronto, discuss the Bard's continuing popularity in the 21st century, his craft in writing the soliloquy, his ease with both humour and tougher topics like political power ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:58
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/20/2018