Filters
Mass media -- Study and teaching  

The National Canadians, politicians targeted by foreign interference, electronic spy agency says

Canadians are vulnerable to foreign interference in this fall's federal election — and the meddling is already underway, according to a new report from the federal electronic spy agency, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC).
  • 2019
  • 00:03:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Political cartoons: Where free speech runs up against poor taste

For the second time in two weeks, a political cartoonist is apologizing for his depiction of former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould in newspaper commentary on the SNC-Lavalin scandal. So, in an arena where free speech runs up against poor taste, is there a line? And if so, who defines it?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Ottawa's fight with Netflix reignites age-old debate: what is Cancon and who should pay?

Canadian studios and production crews are busier than ever before, thanks in part to demand from foreign streaming giants such as Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. At the same time, those American behemoths are being accused of not contributing their fair share to produce Canadian content and culture. But what exactly constitutes Cancon?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Can a law really stop fake news?

India, the world's biggest democracy, heads to the polls in just a few months. It's a country where fake news has actually killed people, something the government is looking to stop by making the dissemination of fake news against the law. But can a law actually stop fake news?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Diversity in film now extending to critics

CBC News looks at how the Toronto International Film Festival is helping more diverse movie reviewers in the spotlight this year.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

News in Review - December 2018 Certain Death: A Mexican Journalist Fights Deportation

When Mexican journalist Emilio Gutiérrez Soto fled his home country with his son back in 2008 he thought his ordeal was over. Mexico is known to have one of the highest murder rates of reporters in the world – just behind war zones like Syria and Afghanistan. Journalists are killed there at a rate of about one per month, according ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/21/2018

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Current Edition subscribers.

More details

The National Tracking bots in the lead-up to the U.S. midterms

Various sites, apps and dashboards have been created to track everything from fake accounts to hashtag hijacking in the lead-up to the U.S. midterms. In this dispatch from Wilkes-Barre, Penn., Steven D'Souza looks at the role social media and fake news will play in this November’s elections, and meets the people being tasked with tackling the problem.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

Studio K Gary Worries About the News

Sometimes the things we hear on the news can be scary. Gary wonders what to do when you hear about things that worry you.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:11
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/08/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Safeguarding Social Media: Facebook's Challenge

Facebook has been the shooting star of social media platforms. Nothing could stop its meteoric rise as two billion users signed up to communicate and share online. But recent scandals from fake news to extremist content have plagued the firm and users are losing trust. If the firm cannot secure personal information and stop hackers, how can users feel safe? ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/16/2018

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Current Edition subscribers.

More details

The National Brexit and U.S. political strategies creep into Canada

Brexit and U.S. political strategies are creeping into Canada via micro-targeting, which delivers tailored messages to specific people who are inclined to react.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

The National Researching the spread of fake news and its impact

Researching the spread of fake news and its impact was the focus of a new report from MIT researchers on how rumours can spread faster and farther than the truth. Perhaps one of the more surprising findings is the suggestion that humans are a bigger issue in the spread of fake news than the bots that often get blamed.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/28/2018

News in Review - March 2018 Trump vs. the Media: The War on Journalism

US President Donald Trump has declared a war on mainstream media. His repeated allegations of "fake news" is undermining the credibility of the fourth estate. As a result, journalists say the integrity of their work is more important now than ever. We take a look at how the media is responding to this war on journalism.
  • 2018
  • 00:20:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/27/2018

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Archives subscribers.

More details

The National Infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time

A small army of activists in Halifax is infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time. It's all about getting tiny pieces of information into a country that tries to shelter its population from the outside world. Students at Dalhousie University are making videos of life in Halifax and putting them on the USB drives. They are they sent ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2018

CBC Docs POV Sickboy

Follow 29-year-old yoga instructor Jeremie Saunders as he lives openly with cystic fibrosis (CF) and looks for ways to remove the stigma attached to chronic illness and disease. Jeremie has grown up in Halifax dealing with CF, with a daily routine that involves using an atomizer and taking dozens of prescription pills. But he keeps a positive outlook and chooses ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/30/2017

CBC Docs POV Mohamed Fahmy: Half Free

Set against the spectre of growing global terrorism, and in an era of vicious attacks on press freedom around the world, Mohamed Fahmy: Half Free is a character study of a Canadian-Egyptian journalist who was jailed for pursuing the truth. With exclusive interviews with some of the world’s most respected journalists who worked alongside Fahmy covering the Arab Spring, the documentary is ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/29/2017

News in Review - October 2017 Social Influencers: Leveraging Popularity for Paydirt

In a world where those with the most followers means popularity and leverage, there’s a new celebrity in town. They’re called social influencers. They tweet, blog and video their brand picks all the way to the bank. And companies are willing to spend big bucks to get their endorsement if they can link their brand to new customers. But what ...
  • 2017
  • 00:14:18
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/18/2017

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Archives subscribers.

More details

Canada: The Story of Us Connected (1824-1890s)

Inventors and entrepreneurs dream of uniting the country through the latest design and technology – and make their fortunes. An extraordinary generation will revolutionize transportation, engineering and communications, making Canada the high-tech superstar of a newly-wired world. Features stories/events include: building the Welland Canal, Cunard steamships, the Victoria Bridge, telegraphy, newspapers. Important note for teachers: This series is intended to ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

News in Review - September 2017 Media and Terror: A Parasitic Relationship?

Terror attacks are making headlines almost nightly. And the media are keen to cover such extremes of violence, bringing the stories to their audiences. But does reporting the violence trigger more attacks? The CBC's Rosemary Barton takes a look at the link between terror attacks and the media.
  • 2017
  • 00:12:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/26/2017

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Archives subscribers.

More details

Firsthand Lost on Arrival: Me, the Mounties & PTSD

The lifetime prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in war journalists is 28.6% — 3.5 times the general population. In 2014, longtime CBC journalist Curt Petrovich was diagnosed with PTSD. This insightful film captures his courageous efforts to rebuild himself from the inside out. From running marathons to experimental MDMA treatments, Curt tries anything to stop the traumatic images ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/11/2017

Brand Canada Rant & Rave

How a marketing guru inhaled Canadian identity and exhaled a new Canadian pride in Molson's seminal TV ad "The Rant."
  • 2017
  • 00:06:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/28/2017

Brand Canada America's Canada

A pop culture-fuelled audit of how American TV influences Canada's brand — through the perspective of the denizens of Mexico City.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/27/2017

Metro Morning Jesse Wente on Cultural Appropriation Controversy

An op-ed piece in Write, a quarterly published by the Writers' Union of Canada, ignited a firestorm of controversy over cultural appropriation and was followed by a chorus of well-established mainstream writers (all white) offering to fund an "appropriation prize." In this powerful segment, Indigenous critic Jesse Wente discusses this media debacle on Metro Morning.
  • 2017
  • 00:07:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/05/2017

The Investigators After Quebec mosque attack, a look at the challenges of breaking news

The Quebec City mosque shooting is raising questions about how journalists report breaking news. Host Diana Swain speaks with an investigative reporter who covered that story.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/31/2017

The National Can online hate be controlled?

After the Quebec City mosque attack, local talk radio shows were implicated for stoking hate, but the worst of it is found online. So, where’s the line between free speech and hate speech?
  • 2017
  • 00:12:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/31/2017

The Current "I invoked cultural appropriation in the context of literature and writing only": Hal Niedzviecki

"I invited Indigenous writers into my house, so to speak, and I insulted them, and I absolutely apologize for that." Writer Hal Niedzviecki regrets using the term "cultural appropriation" in a recent column for Write magazine but says writers shouldn't limit themselves to what they know. The response to his article by the Canadian media prompted a heated conversation about free speech ...
  • 2017
  • 00:19:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/30/2017