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News in Review - September 2019 Climate Change: Canada’s Melting Permafrost

In Canada's Arctic, climate change is already impacting communities and changing ways of life. According to scientists, Canada's northern climate is warming almost three times faster than the global average. As things warm up, the permafrost in the North -- that frozen underlying layer of ground -- is also melting. And that's threatening the way of life for many who ...
  • 2019
  • 00:12:52
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/05/2019

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Bitesize Space Science Spectroscopy and the composition of stars

Jon Chase describes how different elements absorb and emit light of specific wavelengths or colours. He explains how this can be used to identify which elements are present in distant stars by analyzing the spectrum of radiation coming from these stars. Teacher notes: You could discuss how white light can be split into its spectrum and students could make their ...
  • 2014
  • 00:04:11
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/05/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop The impact deforestation has on plants and nature

An overview of the dangers deforestation poses to both plants and animals. This video highlights the impact habitat loss has on animals, how it causes their numbers to decrease, even to the point of extinction. The impact it has on humans is also discussed; in particular, how the lack of trees to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen leads to increased ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:30
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Wave World Can a singer smash a glass using sound waves?

Jon Chase challenges young opera singers in Cardiff to smash glasses with their voices. After measuring the natural frequency of the glass, can the singers match it with enough power to smash it? The results are spectacular slowed down 300 times. Smashing things with sound waves isn’t just for fun. In medicine, sound waves can smash painful, hard growths inside ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Wave World The GB surfing team demonstrate different types of waves

Jon Chase is on Croyde Beach in Devon, headquarters of the junior GB surfing team. His mission is to find out what different types of waves there are and how they work. With Britain's best young surfers, Jon investigates sea waves. How come the waves travel towards the shore but the sea water does not? Using demonstrations on the beach ...
  • 2015
  • 00:03:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop Classifying and grouping plants

An entertaining overview of how plants can easily be arranged according to their common features and characteristics. For example: plants with seeds (e.g. flowering plants and conifers) or without seeds (e.g. ferns and mosses). Teacher notes: You could bring in different variations of plants and get students to catogorize them using the information highlighted in the video. They could then ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop What is pollination and how does it work?

This video explores the process of pollination and the roles different parts of a plant play. The process is summarized at the end though a song. Teacher notes: This video could be used as an introduction to plants and reproduction. Students could write a non-fiction report on plant reproduction or the process of pollination. Working in pairs, they could create ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:42
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop How does water get from the roots to the leaves of a plant?

This video explores how water is transported from the roots, through the tubes in the stem, to the tip of the plant. The process is demonstrated with an experiment. White carnations are placed in water with different colour dyes in them. Eventually the petals adopt the colour of the dyes, thus highlighting the process.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:42
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Wave World What do a solar-powered car and a green plant have in common?

Jon Chase joins engineering students at Cambridge University hoping to win a race across Australia in their solar-powered car. Today they are testing the 110 km/h car on an airfield. They need as much power as possible, so the team uses solar cells normally used in space to power satellites. Jon discovers how the cells use light to make electricity. ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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The Code Fractal geometry in nature and digital animation

Marcus du Sautoy describes how fractal geometry can be used to describe natural objects, and how it is used in digital animation. Trees use the simple rule of trying to maximize surface area, and this is something that can be simulated mathematically to give a very realistic result. Mandelbrot explored this fractal property of infinite complexity in his work, which ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Hexagons in the natural world

Marcus du Sautoy visits a beekeeper and explores how bees create their honeycombs. If they are going to tessellate they have a limited number of regular polygons they could choose from, but the hexagon is the most efficient – giving the maximum storage area for the least amount of wax. In fact, the bees do not create hexagons, but circular ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:13
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science The life cycle of stars

Science presenter and rapper Jon Chase explains how the dust and gas released from dying stars form new stars and solar systems using a Jenga game and a rap. He visits a school where the students play Jenga to demonstrate the balance between the forces in a star, and how they destabilize over time. Jon performs a rap to help ...
  • 2014
  • 00:05:34
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science Gravity on Earth and in space

Jon Chase explains that the mass of an object is constant but its weight depends on the gravitational force. This force is higher on more massive planets and he would weigh more on Jupiter than on Earth. He uses a fairground ride to simulate the feeling of lower and higher gravitational forces. He explains that gravity is the force that ...
  • 2014
  • 00:04:53
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science Nuclear fusion in stars

Jon Chase explains the nuclear fusion that causes stars like our sun to give out enormous heat. Film footage of a nuclear explosion in a hydrogen bomb is used to draw an analogy with the sun’s energy. He mixes iron oxide and aluminum powder to demonstrate a highly exothermic chemical reaction and relates this to the much greater energy output ...
  • 2014
  • 00:04:20
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science The Big Bang and red shift

Jon Chase explains the scale of the solar system and universe using simple demonstrations at a shopping centre and race track. He explains the Doppler effect and introduces red-shift and cosmic microwave background radiation, which provide evidence for an expanding universe. Teacher notes: Use the video as an introduction to a Doppler effect demonstration using a buzzer swung around on ...
  • 2014
  • 00:05:54
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science Waves and communication

Jon Chase demonstrates how electromagnetic waves are used in communication using an infra-red remote control and an outside TV broadcast. He discusses how television broadcast uses microwaves to communicate between Earth and satellites in space. Jon describes and performs a rap about the electromagnetic spectrum and the different types of waves. Teacher notes: The class could use the rap to ...
  • 2014
  • 00:03:50
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Scientists and Scientific Method The work of the 'father of optics' Alhazen

In this vlog style video, Alhazen talks about being a physicist and mathematician, with a speciality in optics and light. He explains that we see because light bounces off objects into our eyes. He outlines the need for observations and making hypotheses, not just using abstract reasoning. He goes on to explain his theory that light travels in a straight ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:03
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop Are plants the same all year round?

An entertaining overview outlining the differences between deciduous trees and evergreens, and their seasonal cycles, including budding and the loss of leaves. Teacher notes: You could get students to research how different plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways. They could pick a plant in the school playground or at home and keep a journal, noting the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:13
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World Using light waves to make an image

Reece McCready is an award-winning young photographer who specializes in portraits. Presenter Jon Chase joins him and his subject, Lola, to see how they use light waves. As Reece uses his camera and lighting gear, Jon follows exactly what happens to the light waves on their journey from light, to Lola, to camera. Jon investigates the two sorts of reflection ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World What happens to sound waves when you record a song?

Jon Chase joins singer-songwriter Charlie-Anne Bradfield in the studio as she performs her song 'Butterfly'. As Charlie-Anne sings, Jon traces the path of the sound waves. He builds a large model to see how the sound waves travel through air. Jon's microphone made out of a plastic cup works just like the real one, turning sound into electrical waves. After ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World How light makes the colours we see

Jon Chase is at Leeds College of Art. The art students here know a thing or two about colour, so they’re taking part in an experiment. Can they work out what happens when light reflects off paints of different colours? One team of students paints the words RED, GREEN and BLUE, in each of the colours, red, green and blue. ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Real World Chemistry How is glass made?

Fran Scott learns how glass is made in a factory. The raw materials are described, together with the use of soda ash to lower the melting point, making it easier to form into useful shapes. The production process is described, including the use of gas burners to maintain the high temperature. Automated equipment is used on a continuous production line ...
  • 2016
  • 00:05:45
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Real World Chemistry How is paint made?

The uses of paint are described. The constituents of an oil paint are described and the function of each ingredient is explained. The differences between an oil paint and an emulsion paint are then explained. The raw materials are briefly described. The process for making a variety of paints is fully automated. Agitation at very high speed is needed in ...
  • 2016
  • 00:05:47
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Real World Chemistry How is plastic made?

Fran Scott visits a company that makes PVC to find out how you turn raw materials into plastic goods. She explains how crude oil is processed using fractional distillation, and uses a model to explain the molecular structure of alkanes, alkenes and polymers. At the plant, she finds out about all the additives that give different types of PVC their ...
  • 2016
  • 00:05:10
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop What do plants need to survive?

In this video we discover what causes various ailments in plants, and under what conditions they can thrive. Through systematic and funny observations of plants being kept under poor conditions by plant shop owner Ivy, the fundamental needs of plants are introduced, such as light, air, water, nutrients and space. Teacher notes: After viewing, students could plant seeds in pots. ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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