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The National Using concrete to trap greenhouse gases

Concrete is the second most used substance in the world after water, and research shows there's a huge environmental cost to making it. To tackle this problem, a Canadian company has come up with an ingenious way that traps the CO2 produced throughout its production within the concrete itself.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

The National How the new carbon plan works

The federal Liberal government will slap a carbon tax on fuels in provinces and territories with no adequate emissions pricing plans of their own. But how will it work? The National explains.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

The National Saving Winnipeg's urban forest

A triple threat of pests have put the trees in Winnipeg’s urban forest at risk. The city has implemented a pest control program to help ward off the Dutch elm disease, emerald ash borer and jumping tree lice that are decimating the forest. 
  • 2018
  • 00:02:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

The National Fighting to protect B.C.'s ancient forests

Environmentalists are using social media to lobby the B.C. government to protect the ancient trees in Vancouver Island’s temperate rainforest from logging companies.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2018

CBC News West Island's fight to save ash trees heats up

The emerald ash borer has been destroying ash trees across southern Quebec for years. Some West Island municipalities say they’re having some success in their fight against the beetle.
  • 2015
  • 00:02:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/28/2018

The National California oil spill a "wake-up call"

Many questions remain after hundreds of thousands of litres of oil leaked onto the California coast, Kim Brunhuber reports.
  • 2015
  • 00:01:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/28/2018

The Nature of Things The Genetic Revolution

Trailblazing scientists are making ground-breaking discoveries in the rapidly evolving world of genetic engineering. Technologies like CRISPR are making it possible to quickly and cheaply change the DNA of all living things, including humans. Today, genes can be edited almost as easily as words on a computer screen. This new ability to alter our DNA holds the promise of curing ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

CBC News The emerald ash borer threatens thousands of Montreal trees

The emerald ash borer is a shiny green bug that could kill hundreds of thousands of trees in Montreal. Chris Buddle is a professor at McGill University and Sylvain Ouellet is a city councillor with Projet Montréal. They spoke to Shawn about their concerns.
  • 2014
  • 00:09:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

The Nature of Things Spying on Animals

Spying on Animals shows us how innovations in remote, unmanned cameras let us bear witness to animal behaviour 24/7, almost anywhere on Earth. This is a revolution for scientists, a new and powerful connection between ourselves and wildlife, and an inspirational force for conservation.
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018

The Nature of Things The Memory Mirage

Memory is under heavy scrutiny by a new generation of scientists — and they’re posing an uncomfortable question: Can we trust what we remember about our lives? Just as we often recall someone’s name incorrectly, scientists say we can misremember critical personal events, catastrophes and even crimes we think we saw committed. Recent studies are questioning the fragile unreliability of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018

The Nature of Things The Real T. rex

A quest to find the truth about an iconic animal we all think we know: the Tyrannosaurus rex, the most famous carnivore to ever walk the earth. What did T. rex really look like? Sound like? How did it move and behave? Ground-breaking scientific discoveries reveal that for years we’ve gotten T. rex wrong.
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2018

The Nature of Things A Day in the Life of Earth

If you thought the Earth needed millions of years to change, it’s time to think again! A Day in the Life of Earth uses the latest science to reveal how much our planet can change in just one single day. The Earth makes a mountain of new rock every hour and is not only continually changing shape but is also losing weight. ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2018

The Nature of Things Equus: Story of the Horse — Chasing the Wind

In Episode 3 of Equus: The Story of the Horse, anthropologist turned filmmaker Niobe Thompson introduces viewers to some of the most fascinating and unlikely of the world’s 400 horse breeds. He meets the Yakutian, at home in the coldest inhabited place on Earth (Siberia). He meets the Arab, a spirited horse at home on the scorching sands of the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/09/2018

Studio K Gary Wants to be a Meteorologist

When Gary the Unicorn grows up he wants to be a meteorologist, so who better than CBC Vancouver's Johanna Wagstaffe to share what the job is all about!
  • 2018
  • 00:01:52
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/08/2018

The National The growing influence of AI and technology

Artificial intelligence could eventually replace human relationships as AI is developed to understand people better than fellow humans. Author Yuval Noah Harari spoke to Rosemary Barton about how technology is influencing our daily lives.
  • 2018
  • 00:10:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Choosing death earlier than planned

A Nova Scotia woman who has chosen a medically assisted death says Canada's new law is too extreme and unfair. She says she's now forced to make the difficult choice to end her life earlier than she'd like.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Trans Mountain pipeline gets some environmentalists' support

They argue that if the project doesn't get built, the risk of moving oil via rail or ships is far worse than a pipeline.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Scientists develop patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli

Scientists at McMaster University are developing a transparent patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Three First World War soldiers identified as Canadians

The remains of three Canadian soldiers who died fighting in northern France during the First World War have recently been identified. The three soldiers from Winnipeg fought in the Battle of Hill 70 in August 1917, the first major action to be led by a Canadian commander. Canadian forces suffered 9,200 casualties in the battle.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

The National Scientists concerned Alzheimer's research will fail

A series of failed drug trials have experts fearing they may be back to square one when it comes to treating the disease.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

The National Rising sea levels will put U.S. homes at risk in near future

The Union of Concerned Scientists says more than 310,000 existing homes are projected to be at risk of flooding every two weeks by 2045. The National visited one coastal community to see how it's dealing with the problem.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

The National Experimental no longer: How immunotherapy is changing cancer treatment

Immunotherapy boosts the immune system or helps the immune system to find cancer and attack it.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Man-Made Extinction: Canada’s Disappearing Caribou Herds

Its image adorns our Canadian 25-cent coin — the magnificent Canadian caribou. It once roamed this country abundantly. Now the woodland caribou is listed as an at-risk species, and southern mountain caribou herds in B.C.'s Southern Interior are especially vulnerable. Although the causes of the decline are varied, it cannot be ignored that much of the blame is due to ...
  • 2018
  • 00:09:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

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Découverte Face Transplant

Face Transplant chronicles an extraordinary surgical success story: the first complete face transplant ever performed in Canada. With just a 50 percent chance of success, medical teams spent 15 months planning every part of the 35-hour operation, consulting with experts, weighing the risks and searching for a donor. From research to recovery, Face Transplant offers viewers an inside look at this remarkable journey, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:49:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/11/2018

The National Smoke suffocates B.C., poses significant health risk

Health officials say even short exposure to the smoke can have wide-ranging effects: from headaches and dizziness to reduced birth weight for babies who are exposed while in the womb.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:16
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/11/2018