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Voice of the Pioneer Black refugees in Ontario

Prof. Daniel Hill continues in the second of a 1979 four-part series of interviews on black history in Ontario with CBC Radio's Bill McNeil. Hill talks about the community volunteer groups that worked so hard to help black refugees arriving in Ontario on the Underground Railway in the mid-19th century, why Ontario was their main destination, the basis of the ...
  • 1979
  • 00:09:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

Breakaway Uncovering the history of slavery in Canada

Uncovering some hard truths about Canada's history of slavery. George Tombs is the translator of Canada's Forgotten Slaves: Two Hundred Years of Bondage, originally written by Marcel Trudel in 1960. It was one of the first history books to map out who used slaves, and painted a picture of who those slaves were. Tombs joins host Saroja Coelho to explain how ...
  • 2018
  • 00:13:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

London Morning Young and black in London

Oakridge Secondary School student Fazia Agbonhin and Western University student Elija Ngoy tell London Morning about their experiences growing up in London and what Black History Month means to them.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

RDI économie La tarification du carbone en déroute?

L’Alberta laisse tomber la taxe carbone. Est-ce que le marché du carbone est en train de s’étioler? Analyse avec Annie Chaloux, professeure à l’Université de Sherbrooke. Épisode du 22 mai 2019.
  • 2019
  • 00:08:39
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 05/30/2019

The National Fighting hate with friendship: The unlikely bond of a Sikh man and a former white supremacist

A Sikh man becomes the unlikely friend of a former white supremacist in the wake of a cold-blooded attack in Wisconsin in 2012. Now they travel the world trying to stop hate.
  • 2019
  • 00:11:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National The lesson Canada's historic building can learn from the Notre-Dame fire

Some of Canada's oldest buildings are places of worship, much like Notre-Dame Cathedral. Montreal alone has 450 churches that date back to the 1800s or earlier. That history is far less cared for, and far more vulnerable than you might think.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National How can governments help stop overwork?

The National has been exploring modern workplaces and why so many Canadians are battling burnout. But it's clearly not just a Canadian problem and depending on where you go around the world, the consequences and solutions can be quite extreme. So here's the question: How can governments help stop overwork?
  • 2019
  • 00:03:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National A Canadian artist's efforts to capture stories of survival

A Saskatoon artist is using her portraits to examine two groups that suffered through oppression; in a way, bringing them face to face.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Surveillance in synagogues: How security is becoming a focus in places of worship

We look at the way synagogues are changing as attacks on places of worship increase.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

Absolutely Canadian The End of the Road

Follow this real life group of American war resisters and free-spirited Canadians and Europeans, escaping conformity and comfort for greener pastures. Not only did this eclectic group of dreamers, artists and intellectuals find Lund, Canada, they accidentally found each other. Overeducated, underemployed and ill-equipped, this adventurous crew finds love, shares lovers and experiments with everything. Not always a utopia, the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:44:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/27/2019

The National As Nunavut struggles with food insecurity, students step up to help feed their peers

Food prices in Canada's north are so high that seven out of 10 young people there go hungry. A Nunavut high school is now trying to fight this food insecurity with a free hot lunch program run by the school's food studies class.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/13/2019

The National Canadians, politicians targeted by foreign interference, electronic spy agency says

Canadians are vulnerable to foreign interference in this fall's federal election — and the meddling is already underway, according to a new report from the federal electronic spy agency, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC).
  • 2019
  • 00:03:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National What you need to know about the federal carbon tax

The federal Liberal government will begin levying its carbon tax on greenhouse gas-emitting fuels today in the four provinces that have refused to take part in the pan-Canadian climate framework.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Indigenous graves have B.C. landowners pitted against the government

Thousands of sites in British Columbia are believed to be ancient First Nations burial grounds. Some are on private lands, and many Indigenous people believe these sites are sacred. But the government doesn't see the burial sites the same way as registered cemeteries, and that has left all parties frustrated and feeling vulnerable.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National ‘Smart’ cities promise economic and environmental benefits to the developing world

Master-planned cities have become a development model, a way for countries in the developing world to jump-start economies and provide a roadmap for the future. But does reality live up to the pitch?
  • 2019
  • 00:16:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National The place of oil and gas in the future of Alberta’s energy sector faces questions

How do oil and gas fit into the future of Alberta’s energy sector? We have a look at how pipeline advocates are coming together with those who believe renewables are the way forward.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:49
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Sam's Story: Sex Assault Survivor Speaks Out

At 17, Sam Fazio was just a regular teenager at a school dance in Vancouver. Then she was violently sexually attacked in a bathroom stall. Sam reported the crime and went through the grueling process of physical and mental recovery while having to deal with police and a court case that left her and others shaking their heads. Since then, ...
  • 2019
  • 00:16:42
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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News in Review - April 2019 Loneliness: The New Silent Killer

More people are lonely than ever before. Studies show that one in five Canadians identify as being lonely. Loneliness is more than a feeling of occasional solitude – it’s a prolonged feeling of perceived isolation. While long seen as being bad for mental health, loneliness is now recognized as being physically harmful too. It's being called the silent killer – ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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The National How Tina Fontaine's death forced a community to take action

Tina Fontaine was a ward of Child and Family Services when she died five years ago — a tragedy that sparked community action to prevent the system from failing someone again.
  • 2019
  • 00:12:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/04/2019

The National Meet the students trying to battle the vaping 'epidemic'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading national public health institute of the United States, calls it an epidemic: the growing and now unprecedented number of teens using e-cigarettes. It's become a big problem in schools across Canada as well, and now some students are taking matters into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National The beautiful slice of Canadian back-country that is dividing Alberta

On the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, a political proxy war has erupted. Alberta wants to turn the Bighorn area just north of Banff into a provincial park, but not everyone is on board with the idea. It has resulted in a debate that is about much more than just a park; one that highlights a growing political divide ...
  • 2019
  • 00:03:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Trudeau delivers official apology for Canada's role in the MS St. Louis

The Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler tested the limits of Canada's humanity in the lead up to the Second World War and Canada's government failed that test "miserably," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said. Trudeau made an apology in the House of Commons for the 1939 decision by the Canadian government to turn away a boatload of German Jews seeking refuge ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National 'Unprecedented' report released on racial profiling by Toronto police

A black person in Toronto is nearly 20 times more likely than a white person to be shot and killed by police, according to a new Ontario Human Rights Commission report on race and policing. The commission's interim report said black people were over-represented in several types of violent police interactions, including use-of-force cases, shootings, deadly encounters and fatal shootings.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019