BBC Channel

Supporting learning is at the heart of the BBC's mission. This channel provides accessible, engaging, inspiring and challenging content covering a wide range of unique documentaries and series. From space science, medicine, animal behaviour to international history and social justice, let the experts take you through a real journey of discovery.

Channels give access to specialized content beyond the basic Curio.ca subscription. Should you wish to add channels to your subscription, please complete the Subscription Quote Request form.

Included in this channel

Bitesize Space Science Spectroscopy and the composition of stars New

Jon Chase describes how different elements absorb and emit light of specific wavelengths or colours. He explains how this can be used to identify which elements are present in distant stars by analyzing the spectrum of radiation coming from these stars. Teacher notes: You could discuss how white light can be split into its spectrum and students could make their ...
  • 2014
  • 00:04:11
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/05/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Ivy's Plant Shop The impact deforestation has on plants and nature New

An overview of the dangers deforestation poses to both plants and animals. This video highlights the impact habitat loss has on animals, how it causes their numbers to decrease, even to the point of extinction. The impact it has on humans is also discussed; in particular, how the lack of trees to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen leads to increased ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:30
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Wave World Can a singer smash a glass using sound waves? New

Jon Chase challenges young opera singers in Cardiff to smash glasses with their voices. After measuring the natural frequency of the glass, can the singers match it with enough power to smash it? The results are spectacular slowed down 300 times. Smashing things with sound waves isn’t just for fun. In medicine, sound waves can smash painful, hard growths inside ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Ivy's Plant Shop What is pollination and how does it work? New

This video explores the process of pollination and the roles different parts of a plant play. The process is summarized at the end though a song. Teacher notes: This video could be used as an introduction to plants and reproduction. Students could write a non-fiction report on plant reproduction or the process of pollination. Working in pairs, they could create ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:42
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Ivy's Plant Shop How does water get from the roots to the leaves of a plant? New

This video explores how water is transported from the roots, through the tubes in the stem, to the tip of the plant. The process is demonstrated with an experiment. White carnations are placed in water with different colour dyes in them. Eventually the petals adopt the colour of the dyes, thus highlighting the process.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:42
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Ivy's Plant Shop Classifying and grouping plants New

An entertaining overview of how plants can easily be arranged according to their common features and characteristics. For example: plants with seeds (e.g. flowering plants and conifers) or without seeds (e.g. ferns and mosses). Teacher notes: You could bring in different variations of plants and get students to catogorize them using the information highlighted in the video. They could then ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Wave World What do a solar-powered car and a green plant have in common? New

Jon Chase joins engineering students at Cambridge University hoping to win a race across Australia in their solar-powered car. Today they are testing the 110 km/h car on an airfield. They need as much power as possible, so the team uses solar cells normally used in space to power satellites. Jon discovers how the cells use light to make electricity. ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

Wave World The GB surfing team demonstrate different types of waves New

Jon Chase is on Croyde Beach in Devon, headquarters of the junior GB surfing team. His mission is to find out what different types of waves there are and how they work. With Britain's best young surfers, Jon investigates sea waves. How come the waves travel towards the shore but the sea water does not? Using demonstrations on the beach ...
  • 2015
  • 00:03:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

The Code Fractal geometry in nature and digital animation New

Marcus du Sautoy describes how fractal geometry can be used to describe natural objects, and how it is used in digital animation. Trees use the simple rule of trying to maximize surface area, and this is something that can be simulated mathematically to give a very realistic result. Mandelbrot explored this fractal property of infinite complexity in his work, which ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details

The Code Normal distribution in fish populations New

Marcus du Sautoy examines a sample of dover sole from a day's catch, and by measuring the weight of this small number of fish, explores how the bell-curve of the Normal Distribution allows us to predict what the largest fish in the population is likely to weigh, even without catching it. The calculations are not shown in full detail, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:09
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

Access to this content is reserved to BBC Channel subscribers.

More details