Canada 150: Key Events

Drawing on our archive of documentaries and news reports, we’ve assembled this collection of big events throughout Canada’s first 150 years. We’ll keep adding to this collection as the year goes on. Let us know your suggestions!

  • 2016
  • 13-14
  • 34 Titles

Included in this collection

The National Behind the Scenes of the Quebec Referendum

The 1995 Quebec referendum ended with the federalist side winning an extremely tight victory. One of the most fascinating and enduring questions of Canadian history is what would have happened if the tight vote had gone the other way? In preparation for the 20th anniversary of the referendum next year, two of Quebec's leading journalists, Chantal Hébert and Jean Lapierre, ...
  • 2014
  • 00:17:35
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/22/2014

CBC News Special Bloody Saturday: The Winnipeg General Strike

In May 1919, 30,000 Winnipeg workers walked off the job and into the history books, launching the largest strike in Canadian history. It lasted six weeks and ended in the violence of Bloody Saturday, a day organized labour has never forgotten or forgiven. Was the strike a legitimate protest against low wages, poor working conditions and a lack of bargaining ...
  • 2007
  • 00:45:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

News in Review - September 2008 Canada's Residential School Apology

In June, the Government of Canada apologized to Aboriginal Canadians for the way they were treated in residential schools. Thousands of Aboriginal children were forced into government-financed schools where many suffered physical and sexual abuse. In this News in Review story, we’ll look at that sad chapter in Canadian history and at the moving ceremony in the House of Commons.
  • 2008
  • 00:18:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/15/2008

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  • Canada's Residential School Apology

News in Review - February 2000 Canadian National: The Continental Railway

According to the Laurentian theory of Canadian history, Canada as a nation developed from east to west because of the immense inland waterway of the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes, and Sir John A. Macdonald’s transcontinental railway, the natural extension of the maritime route. The importance of railways in the evolution of Canadian society cannot be underestimated. And ...
  • 2000
  • 00:07:50
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/15/2000

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  • Canadian National: The Continental Railway

News in Review - November 1991 Capital Punishment in Canada

With the extradition to the United States of Charles Ng and Joseph Kindler as a starting point, Dan Bjarnason does a historical review of this important issue.
  • 1991
  • 00:14:47
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 11/25/2014

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News in Review - September 2000 Deadly Water: The Lessons of Walkerton

Safe drinking water is a prime resource for all humans and something we in Canada may have taken for granted. The tragedy that occurred in the town of Walkerton, where several people died and many more were made very sick by the presence of E. coli bacteria in the municipal water supply, is not only an important and ongoing news ...
  • 2000
  • 00:14:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/15/2000

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  • Deadly Water: The Lessons of Walkerton

The Canadian Experience Expulsion

In 1755, English colonial officials forcibly expelled 7,000 French-speaking Acadians from their lands in Nova Scotia, lands that had been in Acadian hands for almost 150 years. Expulsion follows the epic story of a people played as pawns in a struggle between two empires. It is a saga of death and dislocation and resistance that reverberates still — an event ...
  • 2004
  • 00:44:16
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The National Flood of the Century: Manitoba 10 Years Later

In 1997 an overwhelming deluge of water ruined many lives along Manitoba’s Red River. People lost their homes, their farms, their businesses and were left to start from scratch. Ten years later, we return to the area to find out how those people are doing, whether they have rebuilt their lives and what they have learned from the devastating experience. ...
  • 2007
  • 00:22:47
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/14/2013