Indigenous land and resource management rights

As one CBC report says, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "is setting the bar high" with his promises to recognize and implement Indigenous rights, but many have questions about what his government's approach will change. This collection looks at the modern history of Indigenous land and resource managements rights, including some of the more contentious points. Whether involving federal and provincial governments or private land developers, the same tough questions have often emerged at moments of conflict: who owns the land, who benefits from it and who gets to say when, if and how it gets developed?

  • 2018
  • 13-14
  • 17 Titles

Included in this collection

CBC News "Got Land?": The Controversial T-shirt Slogan

It's a simple slogan that sparked a complicated conversation about First Nations land treaties in Saskatchewan, and a young student found herself in the middle. Thirteen-year-old Tenelle Start didn't realize the controversy her sweatshirt would create until she wore it to school. It reads "Got Land?" on the front, and "Thank an Indian" on the back. Tenelle Starr was asked ...
  • 2014
  • 00:02:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/14/2014

News in Review - January 2015 First Nations Land Disputes

Since Europeans first arrived in Canada, non-Natives have laid claim to lands that were once under the control of the Native population. Increasingly, First Nations people are asking for their land rights to be honoured. Here are two very different cases where a land dispute could leave someone in financial ruin.
  • 2015
  • 00:17:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/21/2015

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  • NIR-15-01 - First Nations Land Disputes

The National Historic First Nations land claim ruling

The Supreme Court has granted title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of land in B.C. to the Tsilhqot'in First Nation.
  • 2014
  • 00:04:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

The National Indigenous graves have B.C. landowners pitted against the government

Thousands of sites in British Columbia are believed to be ancient First Nations burial grounds. Some are on private lands, and many Indigenous people believe these sites are sacred. But the government doesn't see the burial sites the same way as registered cemeteries, and that has left all parties frustrated and feeling vulnerable.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Justin Trudeau promises Indigenous people more rights

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised Indigenous people more rights in Canada, as part of a rethinking of how the federal government approaches the subject. CBC reporter Catherine Cullen looks at how this approach might work on the ground, and Rosemary Barton speaks with Dene leader Georges Erasmus, a former co-chair of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP).
  • 2018
  • 00:05:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/12/2018

News in Review - October 1995 Native Claims: Growing Frustrations

This News in Review story looks at the stand-off at Gustafsen Lake in Secwepemec (Shuswap) territory in B.C. and the occupation of Ipperwash Provincial Park by Chippewa protesters in Ontario. These events during the summer of 1995 are the points of departure for examining the larger issues of land claims and the growing frustration of First Nations groups. Also covered is ...
  • 1995
  • 00:10:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/1995

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News in Review - November 1999 Native Rights: Sharing Resources

The recent Supreme Court ruling, which interpreted a 1760 treaty signed by the British government as granting Mi’kmaq people on the East Coast the right to fish for a “moderate livelihood” even in the off-season, is the latest in a long series of complex events that have precipitated tension, administrative difficulties and conflict in our natural resources industries. The implications ...
  • 1999
  • 00:14:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/15/1999

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  • Native Rights: Sharing Resources

News in Review - September 1990 Oka

Canada’s summer peace was exploded in Oka (Kanesatake) and Chateaugay (Kahnawake) as armed Mohawk Warriors confronted first the Quebec provincial police and then the Canadian Armed Forces. The conflict quickly escalated from one in which the Mohawks attempted to prevent the expansion of a golf course into their territory to one of diametrically opposed views of law, land and rights.
  • 1990
  • 00:14:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/25/2014

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  • Oka