The National

The National is CBC's flagship news program, featuring in depth and original journalism, with hosts Adrienne Arsenault and Ian Hanomansing in Toronto, Rosemary Barton in Ottawa, and Andrew Chang in Vancouver.

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Episodes

The National The resurgence of poetry through a modern medium

Poetry is having a huge surge, largely through the growing popularity of so-called "Insta-poets." These young writers built their audience using Instagram, and have now drifted into the world of celebrity, gracing the front rows of fashion shows and getting celebrity endorsements.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Ottawa unveils air passenger bill of rights

The federal government released draft rules aimed at forcing airlines to provide better customer service, including possible compensation for passengers who are bumped from flights due to overbooking.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Diversity in film now extending to critics

CBC News looks at how the Toronto International Film Festival is helping more diverse movie reviewers in the spotlight this year.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Not your average tech company: What is Huawei and why it matters

Meng Wanzhou, deputy chair and CFO for the Chinese tech giant Huawei, is reportedly wanted by the United States for allegedly contravening U.S. trade sanctions against Iran. This, however, isn't the first time the tech giant has been under scrutiny internationally for its close ties to the Chinese government.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Ontario judge says carding has little to no value as a policing tool

An Ontario judge who earlier this week called for the elimination of random street checks said carding only generates "low quality intelligence" and alienates certain communities from the police.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Saskatchewan's apology for Sixties Scoop leaves survivors with mixed feelings

Starting in the 1950s, about 20,000 Indigenous children across Canada were seized from their birth families and relocated to non-Indigenous homes, where many were stripped of their language, culture and any ties to their families. For some, the apology was long overdue and welcomed. For others, the words rang hollow.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National New lens on life: using photography to heal from trauma

Suicide rates for Indigenous youth in Canada are up to seven times higher than for other young people. A remote community in northern Saskatchewan has been hit particularly hard in recent years, but now they're trying to change that, by discovering the healing power of photography.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Using artificial intelligence to help you learn a new language

If you've ever tried learning a new language, you know how hard it is just to get the basics down, never mind holding a real conversation. A group of Toronto researchers is trying to change that by using a smartphone application with artificial intelligence that can even understand bad accents.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National B.C. industries at an impasse in the 'Heart of the Fraser'

The 80-kilometre stretch of the Fraser River between Mission and Hope, B.C. has become known to conservationists as "the Heart of the Fraser." It's also the site of an ongoing dispute over land use and the potential threats to some of the province's salmon runs.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:49
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Syrian refugee family reunites with parents in Canada

Reporter Susan Ormiston witnessed an extraordinary reunion in Windsor, Ont., as a Syrian refugee family welcomed their parents to Canada.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019