Filters
Biodiversity   Biology   Climatic changes   Earth sciences   Environmental sciences   Geology   9-12   13-14   15-17   general   English  

Good People with Mark Sakamoto Waste

Ingersoll, ON fights a proposed landfill while Nanaimo, BC extends the life of theirs with a more circular economy.
  • 2019
  • 00:22:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/23/2020

Marketplace Fighting back against fast fashion

Marketplace journalist Charlsie Agro visits two schools trying to break the fast fashion cycle after they watched the Marketplace investigation in 2018. She interviews Ontario MPP Donna Skelly, who's calling on her government to implement a province-wide stewardship program.
  • 2019
  • 00:06:25
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/18/2020

Marketplace Clothing Waste: Fashion’s dirty secret

Marketplace investigates clothing recycling programs at fast fashion chains, and reveals the marketing may not live up to what it promises consumers and the planet. While you feel good about dropping off all those used clothes, you might not be doing as much good as you think. Watch host Charlsie Agro's journey as she follows the trail of your old ...
  • 2018
  • 00:22:23
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/18/2020

News in Review - February 2020 Killing Aspen: The Glyphosate Debate

Glyphosate is an herbicide which is marketed under the commercial name of Roundup. Originally created by the Monsanto Corporation, now owned by Bayer, it is the most widely used weed-killer in Canada. It’s sprayed on major food crops like corn, soy and wheat. It’s also widely used in forestry and land management, as it kills off undergrowth and larger trees ...
  • 2020
  • 00:11:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/28/2020

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Current Edition subscribers.

More details

The Nature of Things A Bee's Diary

We see a beehive as a collective, even a super-organism. But each one is filled with thousands of small but bold, six-legged individuals. What if we looked at just one? Scientists are learning that each bee in a hive is an individual with its own personality and this diversity allows the collective to respond and adapt quickly to their environment. ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/21/2020

The Nature of Things Reef Rescue

Over the past 30 years, roughly half of the planet’s coral has been lost. These vital underwater ecosystems are being damaged by pollution and overfishing. But rising water temperatures due to climate change are having the most catastrophic effect of all. There are glimmers of hope in the form of “super corals” that exist in small numbers in places like ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/21/2020

The Nature of Things Aging Well Suzuki Style

“Aging is not a disease... it’s just a natural part of life.” In this documentary from The Nature of Things, 83-year-old host David Suzuki takes viewers along on his journey to discover how to live better and improve one's "health span." How do we keep our balance, coordination, hearing, memory and other markers that can decline with age?
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/20/2020

The Nature of Things Accidental Wilderness: The Leslie Street Spit

In the middle of Canada’s largest city, a natural wilderness is thriving in the unlikeliest of places. This documentary tells the surprising story of the Leslie Street Spit — a remarkably rich wilderness located a few short kilometres from the heart of Toronto. “The Spit,” or Tommy Thompson Park as it’s officially called, was initially conceived of as a breakwater ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/19/2020

The Nature of Things Kingdom of the Tide

From the untamed Pacific to the wild Bay of Fundy, Dr. Sarika Cullis-Suzuki embarks on a coast-to-coast adventure to discover the survival secrets of the creatures that inhabit Canada’s intertidal zones. Despite its beauty, this is one of the toughest environments on earth. Cullis-Suzuki reveals why the health of the world’s oceans is closely linked to the health of these intertidal ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/18/2020

The Nature of Things Nature's Cleanup Crew

To us, it’s garbage. To them, it’s dinner. There are some busy scavengers who live among us — vultures, ants, foxes, opossums and others. Meet the unsung animal heroes who share our urban spaces and clean up our mess. Debunking some myths along the way, this documentary helps us learn what adaptations they have evolved for this “messy” job, what ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2020

The Nature of Things Dinosaur Cold Case

"It looks so close to being freshly dead, I could almost hear in breathing." The accidental discovery in Alberta of one of the best-preserved dinosaurs ever opens a prehistoric cold case to uncover the secrets of its mysterious death.
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2020

CBC Docs POV The Mill

When the government of Nova Scotia announced that the Boat Harbour Effluent Treatment Facility would close on January 31, 2020, it was a huge win for the members of Pictou Landing First Nation. In 2014, a spill of untreated wastewater headed to the facility took place near a Mi’kmaq burial ground, prompting residents to set up a protest blockade that ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2020

The Nature of Things Seals of Sable

Sable Island, Nova Scotia, in the northwest Atlantic is home to the largest breeding colony of grey seals in the world. The grey seal population was once hunted to near extinction but is thriving today. Every winter more than 400,000 grey seals come to the island's shores to give birth and breed, giving researchers a rare opportunity to learn more ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2020

The Nature of Things Takaya: Lone Wolf

For seven years, a solitary wolf lived on some tiny islands off the coast of Victoria, B.C. One photographer followed his journey and discovered how he survived, all alone. Takaya: Lone Wolf recounts the inspirational story of one animal’s resilience and adaptation, and reveals that humans can coexist with apex predators that are often perceived as a lethal threat.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/12/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature What sharp teeth you have!

A look at hyenas, bears and the ancient sabre-toothed cat, Smilodon. Blade-like, scissor-like — the shape of the teeth determines how well an animal can exploit different types of food. For mammal researchers, teeth are the windows into the biology of the animal.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:13
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Mammoth vs. Mastodons

Both mastodons and mammoths were huge, elephant-like beasts that lived in the last ice age. Do you know how to tell them apart? Learn how from the fossil collection curator at the Canadian Museum of Nature.
  • 2014
  • 00:02:26
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Judith: New dinosaur species with an interesting story

Meet Judith — a new species of horned dinosaur nicknamed for the Judith River Formation in Montana, United States, where it was discovered. Judith was scientifically described and named Spiclypeus shipporum by museum palaeontologist Jordan Mallon.
  • 2016
  • 00:02:42
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Preparing a dinosaur for display

Ever wonder what it takes to put a dinosaur fossil on display? It starts with removing the fossil matrix from the field, a plaster jacket, and then delicate, patient extraction. Fossil preparation 101 — check it out!
  • 2019
  • 00:02:49
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Let's Talk About Canadian Volcanoes

The extensive geological diversity of Canada includes young volcanoes. Learn more from Erika Anderson, who’s studied volcanoes and who is the Curator of Mineralogy at the Canadian Museum of Nature.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:46
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

The Nature of Things Listening to Orcas

Since the 1960s, our knowledge of orcas has evolved. This whale species once feared as apex predators and “killers of the deep” are now seen as extraordinarily intelligent, emotional, and social animals. In this documentary from The Nature of Things, marine biologist Dr. Sarika Cullis-Suzuki meets up with some of the scientists who have transformed our awareness of orcas.
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/17/2020

The Nature of Things First Animals

For most of its existence, planet Earth has been a brutal, inhospitable, toxic nightmare, until a half billion years ago when – KABOOM! – life suddenly appeared. First Animals takes you back to the Cambrian Explosion through newly-discovered fossils that tell us more about our own origins. Renowned evolutionary biologist Maydianne Andrade is our guide, showing us how complex – and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/17/2020

The Nature of Things Be Afraid: The Science of Fear

Why do some people seek out terrifying experiences while others avoid fear at all costs? Why does fear spur some to fight and leave others frozen? Although the emotion of fear is as old as life itself, scientists are asking new questions and getting new answers about how our brains process it.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/15/2020

The Nature of Things She Walks With Apes

This is the epic story of three women who embarked on lifelong journeys to study and protect humanity’s closest living relatives: the great apes. Jane Goodall, who left England to live with the chimpanzees of Tanzania and became one of the most famous scientists of our time; American Dian Fossey, who championed the mountain gorillas of Rwanda and, though she ...
  • 2019
  • 01:28:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/13/2020

CBC News Explainer: What's missing when we talk while wearing protective masks?

CBC News asked two experts what's lost from the human experience when one of our biggest tools of communication is eclipsed and muffled by cloth.
  • 2020
  • 00:05:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/07/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature The Passenger Pigeon: A story of modern extinction

On September 1, 1914, the extinction of the passenger pigeon became official when the last of its species (a bird named Martha) died. Hear the story of how billions of birds became zero. Get a glimpse of a special exhibition in honour of the ill-fated passenger pigeon. See irreplaceable specimens from the Canadian Museum of Nature collection.
  • 2014
  • 00:03:08
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/23/2020