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Day 6 "He doesn’t need the NFL": How Colin Kaepernick controls his narrative

Colin Kaepernick may still be without a job, but the football quarterback is making his presence known. During the 2018 NFL season opener, Kaepernick was featured in a Nike ad. Two years ago, Kaepernick became famous – and infamous – for taking a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial inequality and police violence. The former San Francisco ...
  • 2018
  • 00:07:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

The National Pregnancy, privacy and third-party marketing

A Toronto woman who signed up for a mailing list at a maternity store and later miscarried was shocked to receive a package of formula in the mail. She told CBC’s Go Public she was surprised about the extent to which her personal information was shared with third-party marketing companies.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Regular women as lingerie models? Startups challenge Victoria's Secret to get 'real'

Several new brands are featuring regular women in their advertising as a way to capitalize on what they see as a glaring weakness in Victoria's Secret's marketing: The lack of diversity in body shapes and sizes.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/08/2019

The National Canadian startup uses AI to reduce job interview bias

A Canadian startup is using artificial intelligence to try to reduce bias in the hiring process. CBC News visited Knockri's headquarters to find out more about the promises its technology makes and the challenges it faces.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

On the Money What a yarn

CBC's Aaron Saltzman on Canadian knitters detained at the U.S. border amid a visa confusion.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

News in Review - September 2018 Oh Cannabis: Canada Legalizes Pot

The government of Canada is legalizing the sale and use of recreational marijuana for people 19 years of age and up (18 in Alberta and Quebec) as of October 17, 2018. That makes Canada only the second country in the world to legalize pot. There will be strict regulations surrounding where the drug can be consumed, bought and grown. But ...
  • 2018
  • 00:16:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/10/2018

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The National Marijuana and fashion rolled together in budding industry

The National takes a look at how brands are beginning to develop and promote their cannabis as lifestyle products, often with female consumers in mind.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/03/2018

The National Legalizing recreational marjiuana in Canada and what's at stake

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada is looming and there's a lot at stake financially for those who have invested in industrial scale cannabis operations. Legalizing marijuana would also represent a cultural shift for many people — including what to call it.
  • 2018
  • 00:13:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/03/2018

The National Millennials are changing the franchise business model

The new generation is using the old model as an alternative to precarious employment and even traditional or conventional jobs, but giving it a fresh new take.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2018

The National Women-focused co-working spaces increase in Canada

The spike coincides with the rise of the #MeToo movement, as more women look for an alternative to the male-dominated workplace. But are these women-only workplaces discriminatory?
  • 2018
  • 00:04:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2018

The National Fishy foods: Your seafood may not be what it says on the package

There may be something fishy about your seafood — it might not actually be what it says on the package. Oceana Canada, an ocean research charity, is hoping citizen scientists in Halifax armed with DNA kits will help them sniff out seafood fraud. The group estimates as much as 40 per cent of seafood sold in Canada is mislabelled.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Queen honours Canadian for making prosthetics for refugees

Queen Elizabeth honoured a young Canadian for her work in making prosthetics for refugees. Midia Shikh Hassan, a Syrian-Canadian, was given the Queen's Young Leader Award in London. She's worked to develop 3D-printed prosthetic limbs for refugees in camps. The prosthetics only cost $20 to produce, much less than previous alternatives.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018

The National Clothing that doesn't sacrifice fashion for sustainability

Fashion doesn't have to be sacrificed for sustainability and several Canadian designers are trying to make a difference in the way they produce clothes. The fashion industry is the second-worst polluting industry, but things are changing, albeit slowly. CBC News speaks to two designers who, in different ways, have changed their ways to create clothing that's sustainable, good for the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018

The National New technology gets fresh food to remote Canadian communities

New technology is helping get fresh food to remote Canadian communities. It's a portable hydroponic garden system called the 'Growcer' and it could be the fix these communities have been looking for to keep food costs down and lead a healthier lifestyle.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/12/2018

The National Weight Watchers' new plan draws heavy criticism

WeightWatchers' new plan to help youth stay healthy is drawing heavy criticism from dietitians. The company says it's not just focusing on calorie-counting anymore but rather healthy eating. However, WeightWatchers is now facing calls to cancel its offer by the U.S. National Eating Disorders Association, which says the issue of obesity goes deeper than what you eat.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/08/2018

News in Review - December 2017 Disability in Demand: Hiring People with Autism

Those with autism have not always been considered good candidates for the workforce. But that’s changing now. Employers are realizing that the unique qualities of an autistic mind can make for an employee who excels in certain thinking patterns. And that means a largely unemployable portion of the population is suddenly in demand. That’s not an accident. One firm in ...
  • 2017
  • 00:14:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/20/2017

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Venture Behind the Glass

Consumers are so bombarded with advertising that people who run focus groups are being forced to come up with new ways to extract information from consumers. One company chose participants with opposing views on a product and let them duel it out. Another company hired an anthropologist to follow individual consumers for a day. Used properly, focus groups can gain ...
  • 2000
  • 00:07:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/08/2017

Canadian History: A Conversation How Much Do You Know about the Roles Women Played in Canadian History?

Who were the key women in Canadian history? How well do we know their stories? Moderated by Marivel Taruc, host of CBC's Our Toronto, the panel includes: Pamela Sugiman, Ryerson University; Funke Aladejebi, York University; and Tarah Brookfield, Wilfrid Laurier University.
  • 2017
  • 00:40:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

On the Money Fighting Sexism

Keith Mann did a great job of getting the online marketplace Witchsy up and running — except he's a complete fabrication created by company co-founders Penelope Gazin and Kate Dwyer who were finding that sexism was a barrier to their progress as a start-up.
  • 2017
  • 00:06:29
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/18/2017

CBC Short Docs Tshiuetin

Take a ride through Nothern Quebec and Labrador on Canada’s first First Nations-owned railway. The Tshiuetin train line extends 132.5 miles from Emeril, Labrador to Schefferville, Quebec. The majority of passengers on the train travel regularly for work and family engagements, using the railroad because road and air transport isn’t possible in the region – a unique reality that highlights ...
  • 2016
  • 00:10:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2017

Brand Canada Rant & Rave

How a marketing guru inhaled Canadian identity and exhaled a new Canadian pride in Molson's seminal TV ad "The Rant."
  • 2017
  • 00:06:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/28/2017

Brand Canada Canada the Good? Must-See

Simon Anholt, the renowned policy analyst behind the Good Country Index, assesses the international perception of Canada — and whether we're as "good" as we think we are.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/27/2017

CBC Short Docs Headdress

“To me, the headdress is a symbol of leadership.” JJ Neepin is a female Indigenous filmmaker, and with the help of photographer Nadya Kwandibens, she plans to recreate her great-grandfather’s portrait. The headdress is a powerful symbol with great meaning in First Nations communities. Headdress is the start of an ongoing conversation about tradition and cultural appropriation.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2017

Metro Morning Jesse Wente on Cultural Appropriation Controversy

An op-ed piece in Write, a quarterly published by the Writers' Union of Canada, ignited a firestorm of controversy over cultural appropriation and was followed by a chorus of well-established mainstream writers (all white) offering to fund an "appropriation prize." In this powerful segment, Indigenous critic Jesse Wente discusses this media debacle on Metro Morning.
  • 2017
  • 00:07:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/05/2017

The National ViewPoint | The reality of Canadian startups

Technology futurist Jesse Hirsh says it's time to stop incubating dreams of startups that want to sell to big companies and start rewarding startups that want to stay in Canada.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 06/01/2017