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The Code Using patterns in Google searches to predict flu outbreaks

Marcus du Sautoy explores how internet searches are building up a huge database of linked information which can then be mined for patterns. Visiting Google’s offices, he sees this at work and reveals just how closely Google can predict flu outbreaks, even before hospitals have begun to need to respond to them. Flu kills hundreds of thousands each year, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:02
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Cracking the Code Programming robots to play football

Two young coders find out about the instructions that tell robots what to do, looking at the code that operates both a robot football team and an ICub robot that is capable of learning new things. Science reporter Minna Kane takes them to Plymouth University to meet the Black Ninjas, a robot football team who play in the robot World ...
  • 2013
  • 00:08:54
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Cracking the Code Simulating the experience of F1 racing

Two young coders find out about the physics and data processing that goes into creating a realistic simulator for F1 drivers to use in training. Science presenter Minna Kane takes them to ride with a professional F1 driver at Silverstone, before visiting the University of Hertfordshire’s simulator. The simulator hardware includes high resolution screens, realistic controls and hydraulic legs to ...
  • 2013
  • 00:07:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Secret Life of Canada Shout Out to Tom Longboat

Meet Tom Longboat, an Onondaga long distance runner born in 1887 on Six Nations. Tom became one of the most celebrated athletes of all time, despite his struggles and encountering racism throughout his career.View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2018
  • 00:02:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Nature of Things Food for Thought

We’re fed a lot of advice about our diets and what we shouldn't eat, but half the calories we consume come from ultra-processed starch, sugar, salt, hydrogenated oils, preservatives and additives. These processed foods are tasty and manufactured to make us crave them — but they’re killing us.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The Nature of Things Something in the Air

For a Canadian family living in Beijing, putting on face-masks to guard against smog is part of the morning routine. In China, air pollution causes more than 3,000 premature deaths every day. And cities across Asia and Europe — including London and Paris — now have to ban downtown traffic to manage their “Airpocalypse” days. But what about here at ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

CBC Radio One PM Pierre Trudeau sends telegram to Canadians after Summit Series

After Canada's victorious hockey game against the Soviets, Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau drafts a congratulatory telegram for Team Canada in Moscow. He says the win is especially remarkable because the players were able to pull up from behind. For the past couple of hours, all regular activity was put on hold as Canada watched game 8 on television sets ...
  • 1972
  • 00:01:28
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

Day 6 "He doesn’t need the NFL": How Colin Kaepernick controls his narrative

Colin Kaepernick may still be without a job, but the football quarterback is making his presence known. During the 2018 NFL season opener, Kaepernick was featured in a Nike ad. Two years ago, Kaepernick became famous – and infamous – for taking a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial inequality and police violence. The former San Francisco ...
  • 2018
  • 00:07:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

The National The lesson Canada's historic building can learn from the Notre-Dame fire

Some of Canada's oldest buildings are places of worship, much like Notre-Dame Cathedral. Montreal alone has 450 churches that date back to the 1800s or earlier. That history is far less cared for, and far more vulnerable than you might think.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Why teens aren't getting enough sleep

A number of U.S. school boards plan to start classes later so students will be more alert. CBC's Duncan McCue revisits the stories of the young and the sleepless.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Surveillance in synagogues: How security is becoming a focus in places of worship

We look at the way synagogues are changing as attacks on places of worship increase.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National As Nunavut struggles with food insecurity, students step up to help feed their peers

Food prices in Canada's north are so high that seven out of 10 young people there go hungry. A Nunavut high school is now trying to fight this food insecurity with a free hot lunch program run by the school's food studies class.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/13/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Loneliness: The New Silent Killer

More people are lonely than ever before. Studies show that one in five Canadians identify as being lonely. Loneliness is more than a feeling of occasional solitude – it’s a prolonged feeling of perceived isolation. While long seen as being bad for mental health, loneliness is now recognized as being physically harmful too. It's being called the silent killer – ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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The National Meet the students trying to battle the vaping 'epidemic'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading national public health institute of the United States, calls it an epidemic: the growing and now unprecedented number of teens using e-cigarettes. It's become a big problem in schools across Canada as well, and now some students are taking matters into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Canadians get creative in solving food waste problem

CBC News spoke to several businesses to see how they're developing creative solutions and technology to reduce the tons of food that end up in landfills.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National B.C. measles outbreak has some kids taking their health into their own hands

Some 33 students and staff at the centre of a measles outbreak in Vancouver have been ordered to stay home because they haven't provided proof of vaccination. This has some B.C. kids taking their health into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

The National Health Canada's new food guide takes a radical overhaul

For the first time in 12 years a new Canada Food Guide is being served. Its goal: get Canadians to eat well. And this time around, Health Canada says the food industry was not involved. Experts say the recommendations made in the food guide are rooted in science, with evidence to back them up. But how do these suggestions fit ...
  • 2019
  • 00:02:35
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/21/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Sleep Deprivation: Canada's Latest Epidemic

About a third of Canadian adults say they get less than the recommended eight hours of sleep per night. And for teens, it's just as bad – more than half get much less than the eight to 10 hours per night of recommended shut eye. So why is sleep so important? Studies show that sleep is necessary to recharge, improve ...
  • 2019
  • 00:20:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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News in Review - March 2019 Canada's New Food Guide: Eating Healthier to Live Better

In January 2019 Health Canada released its new revised food guide. It was the first update of the nutritional eating manual in 12 years. Gone is the emphasis on serving sizes and food groups, replaced now with larger portions of fruit and vegetables and more plant-based proteins. The new guide has its fans and its haters. Some praise Health Canada ...
  • 2019
  • 00:15:24
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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The National ADHD drugs being over-prescribed to Quebec teens, doctors warn

Quebec doctors warn ADHD drugs are being over-prescribed to teens at twice the rate of any other province, leading to potentially harmful long-term effects.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National How changing language could help in the fight against opioids

If you had any doubt about whether Canada's opioid crisis was getting better or worse, the latest numbers tell a big part of that story: it's still out of control. More than 9,000 people died between January 2016 and June 2018. There's a lot of talk about how to turn things around, but there may be another side to it ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/11/2019

News in Review - February 2019 Food's Carbon Footprint: Creating Sustainable Sources

The food we eat is under threat. There's less arable land and more people to feed than ever before. Add to that the fact that everything we produce leaves a carbon footprint. Greenhouse gases are created in the way we grow, harvest, ship, store, package, cook and dispose of the food we eat. So how do we make our food ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2019

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The National How do you feed a world dealing with climate change?

As the planet keeps on warming, new technology aims to mitigate climate change to some extent. However, some warming has already happened. With more to come, people will need to adapt. Consider the stakes in Africa. Countries there already import billions worth of food. If the deserts keep encroaching, if the droughts get worse, feeding people will get harder and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019