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Canadian Museum of Nature Let's Talk About Canadian Volcanoes

The extensive geological diversity of Canada includes young volcanoes. Learn more from Erika Anderson, who’s studied volcanoes and who is the Curator of Mineralogy at the Canadian Museum of Nature.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:46
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/03/2020

The Nature of Things Listening to Orcas

Since the 1960s, our knowledge of orcas has evolved. This whale species once feared as apex predators and “killers of the deep” are now seen as extraordinarily intelligent, emotional, and social animals. In this documentary from The Nature of Things, marine biologist Dr. Sarika Cullis-Suzuki meets up with some of the scientists who have transformed our awareness of orcas.
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/17/2020

The Nature of Things First Animals

For most of its existence, planet Earth has been a brutal, inhospitable, toxic nightmare, until a half billion years ago when – KABOOM! – life suddenly appeared. First Animals takes you back to the Cambrian Explosion through newly-discovered fossils that tell us more about our own origins. Renowned evolutionary biologist Maydianne Andrade is our guide, showing us how complex – and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/17/2020

The Nature of Things Grasslands: A Hidden Wilderness

Today the wild prairie is a shadow of its former self. Temperate grasslands, as a whole, are now considered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature to be the most endangered — and least protected — habitat type in the world. Prior to European settlement, North America’s Great Plains were home to enormous, thundering herds of bison. Wolves ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Native mussels fight back

Find out how some native mussels are hanging on... despite the dire threat by invasive zebra mussels. Mussel expert André Martel takes us to the Rideau River in Smith Falls, Ontario.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/23/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Searching for lichens in Nova Scotia

Kejimkujik National Park in Nova Scotia is rich in lichen biodiversity. Tag along with lichenologist Troy McMullin as he finds an assortment of these miniscule marvels that are new to this park. See impressive close-up photos of the lichens as well.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:07
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/23/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Lynn Gillespie, botanist sharing knowledge of plants

Sharing knowledge with youth is an important part of a scientist’s job. Lynn Gillespie, Head of Botany at the Canadian Museum of Nature, joins the Students on Ice expedition and shares her interest in studying plants.
  • 2011
  • 00:04:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/10/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Jennifer Doubt: Discovering Arctic plants

Canadian Museum of Nature Curator of Botany Jennifer Doubt joins Students on Ice, collects plants from the field and learns about traditional knowledge from elders.
  • 2014
  • 00:02:39
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 12/19/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Puijila, the “walking” seal

A Canadian Museum of Nature scientist discovers evolutionary evidence of a mammal transforming to “return” to the sea. An amazing fossil from the Arctic of 20 million years ago, Puijila darwini is a land animal that links to the origin of seals.
  • 2009
  • 00:04:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/18/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Clues to climate change in Arctic lakes and rivers

Biologist and diatom expert Paul Hamilton finds clues about climate change by studying tiny life forms in the Arctic’s lakes and rivers. Hamilton talks about his work examining microscopic life in the Arctic.
  • 2013
  • 00:02:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/18/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Arctic fossil forest of 50 million years ago

Fossil sites in the Arctic from about 50 million years ago provide a glimpse of life that evolved in the tropical forest under extreme greenhouse conditions. The Arctic was a warm, wet, swampy, forested place 50 million years ago. Ellesmere Island is a key fossil site in Canada's High Arctic, where the remains of unique mammal species can tell us ...
  • 2011
  • 00:03:36
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/13/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Algae in the ice and climate change

Biologist Michel Poulin describes the importance of the “lungs of the ocean” – tiny algae and phytoplankton that drive the food chain in the Arctic.
  • 2019
  • 00:01:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/13/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Botanist Jeff Saarela discusses climate change and shrubification

Some thoughts from a botanist about how climate change could affect the range and type of plant life that is fundamental to life in the Arctic.
  • 2019
  • 00:01:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/13/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Camel discovery in High Arctic

Who knew camels originate from the Americas and lived in the Arctic? An amazing discovery in Canada’s Arctic reveals a camel that lived on Ellesmere Island about 3.5 million years ago. New insight into camel evolution comes from an amazing discovery of bones from the leg of an extinct giant camel in Canada's High Arctic. Natalia Rybczynski, Ph.D., a palaeobiologist ...
  • 2013
  • 00:03:58
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/12/2019

The Nature of Things Under Thin Ice

Under Thin Ice follows Canadian extreme divers and cinematographers Jill Heinerth and Mario Cyr on a journey to investigate how Arctic wildlife is adjusting to global warming. The Arctic is a majestic world, home to wildlife rarely seen further south: bowhead whales, polar bears, narwhals and walruses. Life thrives on and under a legendary blanket of snow and ice, covering millions ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/06/2019

Documentary Under Thin Ice (long version)

In Under Thin Ice, two divers, Jill Heinerth and Mario Cyr, tell us about their risky expedition to the Canadian Arctic. They had first intended to document arctic ecosystems and marine wildlife, but were faced with an unexpected reality. The Arctic is warming very fast and the animals are not where they used to be. Through their testimonies, Jill and Mario ...
  • 2019
  • 00:51:51
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 11/27/2019

News in Review - November 2019 Arctic Ambitions: Russia’s Race to Control Northern Resources

Russia and Canada share a border in the Arctic, and both countries are hungry to control the vast resources it offers. With global warming, much of the sea ice is melting, giving access to waterways that are faster and more economical for year-round shipping. The Arctic is also thought to possess up to one quarter of the Earth’s undiscovered oil ...
  • 2019
  • 00:10:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2019

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News in Review - September 2019 Climate Change: Canada’s Melting Permafrost

In Canada's Arctic, climate change is already impacting communities and changing ways of life. According to scientists, Canada's northern climate is warming almost three times faster than the global average. As things warm up, the permafrost in the North -- that frozen underlying layer of ground -- is also melting. And that's threatening the way of life for many who ...
  • 2019
  • 00:12:52
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/05/2019

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The Secret Life of Canada The Secret Life of the North

Nunavut has the largest land mass out of all the provinces and territories in Canada – and yet, it is an area that many of us know the least about. In this episode, we look at the forced relocation of the Inuit, the Eskimo Identification System, and the dog slaughter perpetuated by the Canadian government. How has the North been ...
  • 2018
  • 00:35:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

News in Review - January 2019 Global Warming Warning: What Yukon's Glaciers Tell Us

Global warming is having a massive impact on the planet. In October 2018, the world’s leading climate scientists met and warned that there are only a dozen years to limit global warming. They predict urgent change is needed or the planet is in peril. Much of that warming can be linked to human activity. Glaciers are barometers of climate change ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/30/2019

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The National Climate change could wake up Canada's dormant volcanoes

Scientists at Simon Fraser University argue that climate change is destabilizing volcanoes around the world, and they're using a British Columbia mountain range to prove their theory. Not far from Whistler, Mount Meager shows signs of dangerous things to come, which has researchers keeping a very close eye on it.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/08/2019

The National Newfoundland government encourages residents to abandon their small communities

A provincial government plan in Newfoundland and Labrador is encouraging residents to abandon tiny communities for cost savings. The plan is not without its critics, who say they prefer life in rural communities over the potential benefits of city living.
  • 2018
  • 00:07:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/12/2018

Absolutely Canadian The Dinosaur Echo

The documentary introduces us to unknown boneheads and up-and-coming palaeontologists who are leading research and advancing palaeontology in Alberta and British Columbia.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:27
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2018

News in Review - November 2017 Northern Lifeline: Churchill's Struggle for Survival

Churchill, Manitoba, is located on the west shore of the Hudson Bay and is Canada’s gateway to the North. Historically, it’s been an important port since before the Hudson Bay Company built its first fort there. These days, it’s best known for being the polar bear capital of the world. Despite its tourist reputation, the town is facing incredible hardship. ...
  • 2017
  • 00:14:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2017

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The Wild Canadian Year Making The Wild Canadian Year

Watch the incredible feats of endurance and technical wizardry needed to capture the sequences featured in the landmark series The Wild Canadian Year, winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/09/2017