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Documentary Quebec My Country, Mon Pays

Quebec My Country Mon Pays charts the aftermath of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution in the 1960s. This social justice movement unleashed dramatic cultural and political changes that led to the separatist movement, the FLQ terrorist crisis and, ultimately, the exodus of more than 600,000 English-speaking Quebecers. Montreal-born filmmaker John Walker reveals his own complicated relationship with the province in a film ...
  • 2016
  • 01:23:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/21/2020

CBC Radio One Raid or Liberation

In 1943, unionism came to Sudbury, Ontario in the form of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, also known as Mine Mill. In an organizing drive which set a record, the Mine Mill union signed up a majority of workers within three months. By the time of this program's broadcast 20 years later, workers' wages had trebled, ...
  • 1962
  • 00:50:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/15/2020

News in Review - February 2020 The Montreal Massacre: 30 Years On

On a cold December night 30 years ago, a man walked into Montreal’s École Polytechnique, separated the men from the women and started shooting the women. Fourteen women died that day and 13 others were wounded. In a suicide note, the killer claimed he did it because he hated feminists, whom he held responsible for ruining his life. Thirty years ...
  • 2020
  • 00:16:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/28/2020

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CBC News What is the Métis sash?

This news report takes a closer look at the history behind the Métis sash and its cultural significance to the Métis today.
  • 2020
  • 00:04:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/02/2020

CBC Kids News A brief history of the Black Lives Matter movement

CBC Kids News contributor Elijah Sandiford digs into the history of the Black Lives Matter movement. Historian and sociologist Afua Cooper describes some critical moments in black history and Vancouver activist Jacob Callender-Prasad talks about his role fighting anti-black racism.
  • 2020
  • 00:07:00
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/09/2020

News in Review - April 2020 Pipeline Protests: Resource Development Challenges Indigenous Rights in B.C.

In early 2020, Coastal GasLink started work on a 670-kilometre, multi-billion dollar pipeline project designed to move natural gas from the B.C Interior to the West Coast. That pipeline goes through the traditional territory of the Wet'suwet'en people. The company claimed it had authority from both the province and 20 First Nations band councils, including five Wet'suwet'en Nation band councils. ...
  • 2020
  • 00:15:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/06/2020

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National Battlefields Commission Battles 1759-1760

This video is an account of the siege of Quebec in 1759-1760 as described by those who were there. Everything you will hear is based on historic sources, such as personal letters and diaries, describing the siege of the city. Nearly 20 military and civilian witnesses tell their story. For a clearer picture of events, they are grouped together under ...
  • 2020
  • 00:25:47
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/21/2020

CBC News Indigenous youth talk to press in front of B.C. Legislature (February 26, 2020)

Indigenous youth gathered on the steps of the B.C. Legislature repeat a series of demands, including calls for RCMP to leave Wet'suwet'en territory and for Coastal GasLink construction to end. They say they will continue to hold the space in solidarity with Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs at least until those calls are met. Among speakers are: Ta’Kaiya Blaney (Tla'Amin First Nation); Gina Mowat ...
  • 2020
  • 00:36:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/06/2020

Metro Morning As the police arrest protesters in Tyendinaga, Jesse Wente questions the myths that Canadians believe about themselves

Metro Morning columnist Jesse Wente asks individual Canadians to show real solidarity, as politicians revert to police-enforced "solutions" for Indigenous protests.
  • 2020
  • 00:05:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/06/2020

The Fifth Estate Fishing for Fun and Death

Warner Troyer explores the presence of mercury in some of Northern Ontario's lakes and rivers. In Minamata, Japan in 1956 a new disease was discovered and the cause was mercury poisoning from ingested fish. The disease came to be known as Minamata disease. At that time the Ontario government found it also existed in the Wabigoon River and banned commercial ...
  • 1975
  • 00:27:42
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 03/04/2020

The Journal Grassy Narrows: Community in crisis

This clip from The Journal looks at the troubling violence, addiction and despair afflicting the tiny reserve town of Grassy Narrows, just north of Kenora, Ontario. The social crisis there intensified despite — some say because of — the good intentions of governments and "do-gooders," as described by reporter Keith Morrison. The province's forced relocation of Anishinaabe residents, and its later feeble ...
  • 1983
  • 00:13:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/28/2020

Wiih'teh Traditional names (ᐄᓅ ᐊᔨᒧᐎᓐ / Cree / Cri)

Generations of Cree were pressured by the church and government to give their children English or French names. Now, young parents are reclaiming traditional naming practices. In this episode, Mary and Betsy talk about which Cree names are trending right now. Elder Thomas Coon shares the history of the practice, and Whapmagoostui mother Melissa Natachequan explains how she chose her ...
  • 2020
  • 00:15:29
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/21/2020

News in Review - January 2020 Wexit: How the West was Lost

Calls for western separation or so-called "Wexit" are at an all-time high. A third of Albertans now think they would be better off outside of Canada. The unrest is largely due to lack of progress on building pipelines to get Alberta's oil and gas to market. And while Albertans are some of the richest people in Canada, after years of ...
  • 2020
  • 00:16:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/18/2020

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News in Review - December 2019 Election 2019: Canada Goes to the Polls

The writ was dropped, the election called and the politicians were off. The six-week federal election campaign quickly became a forum for personal attacks and finger-pointing. Scandals plagued the short but intense campaign. While polls suggested the LIberals and Conservatives were neck and neck, it was the Liberals’ race to lose. While they lost seats, they did manage to squeak ...
  • 2019
  • 00:16:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/30/2020

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News in Review - December 2019 School Violence: How Safe Are Our Children? (Story B)

When your child goes to school, you expect them to be safe. As an exclusive CBC News investigation into school violence reveals, that isn’t always the case. That certainly didn’t happen in Devan Selvey’s case. The 14-year-old boy was stabbed to death outside his school in Hamilton, Ontario in October 2019. He later died in hospital. His mother witnessed the ...
  • 2019
  • 00:14:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/13/2020

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The Secret Life of Canada The Indian Act

What is the Indian Act and why Canada still have it on the books? The Secret Life team looks at the roots of this complicated policy, which after 143 years is still embedded in Canadian identity, from the policy that led to the Act to how it still impacts Indigenous identities today.View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2019
  • 00:43:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/24/2019

The Secret Life of Canada Shout Out to Jackie Shane

Meet Jackie Shane, the singer and trailblazer who came to prominence during Toronto's bustling Yonge Street music scene during the '60s.View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2018
  • 00:03:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada Shout Out to Tom Longboat

Meet Tom Longboat, an Onondaga long distance runner born in 1887 on Six Nations. Tom became one of the most celebrated athletes of all time, despite his struggles and encountering racism throughout his career.View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2018
  • 00:02:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada Shout Out to Bernelda Wheeler

Meet Bernelda Wheeler, the "First Lady of Indigenous Broadcasting in Canada". The broadcaster, journalist, actor and activist inspired a generation of Indigenous journalists.View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2019
  • 00:03:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada The Secret Life of the North

Nunavut has the largest land mass out of all the provinces and territories in Canada – and yet, it is an area that many of us know the least about. In this episode, we look at the forced relocation of the Inuit, the Eskimo Identification System, and the dog slaughter perpetuated by the Canadian government. How has the North been ...
  • 2018
  • 00:35:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada The Secret Life of Chinatown

Most major cities across Canada have a Chinatown – but how did they start, and why? What is the historical importance of Chinatowns? How did Chinatowns go from safe-havens to celebrated cultural spaces?  This episode, a look at the early history of Chinese people this side of the Pacific, and the historic Chinatown in B.C. that predates Confederation. (Hint: it's ...
  • 2019
  • 00:28:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada The Secret Life of Water

Can the foundation of Canada be traced back to Indigenous waterways and trade routes? In this episode, Falen and Leah take a trip across the Great Lakes, they talk corn and vampires, and discuss some big concerns currently facing Canada's water. What is the past, present and future of this precious resource?View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2019
  • 00:50:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada The Secret Life of the Province of Jamaica

How did different groups of black men and women successfully work together towards labour activism and human rights in Canada? This episode we take a look at early Caribbean migration to Canada and reveal which islands could have become Canadian provinces. We also dive into the history of Black railway porters and how they and their wives made Winnipeg a ...
  • 2019
  • 00:50:07
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The Secret Life of Canada Shout Out to Madhu Verma

Meet Madhu Verma, child refugee turned newcomer advocate. Changed from her experience of displacement in childhood, in the aftermath of the India-Pakistan partition, Madhu Verma became an effective advocate on behalf of new Canadians in New Brunswick. View the Secret Life of Canada curriculum package
  • 2019
  • 00:03:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

The National Trudeau exonerates wrongfully convicted Chief Poundmaker

In the hills of west-central Saskatchewan, on the reserve that bears the name of a revered and wrongly convicted First Nations leader, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau set right a historic wrong: exonerating the Cree Chief Poundmaker and recognizing his true legacy.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019