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CBC | Radio-Canada Documentary The Style is the Man Himself (Part 2 of 2)

A look at the Liberal leadership campaign in which Pierre Trudeau defeated candidates Lorne Henderson, Eric Kierans, Paul Hellyer, Robert Winters, Mitchell Sharp, Allan MacEachen, Paul Martin, John Turner and Joe Greene. Includes footage of their candidacy announcements, campaigning, convention speeches and between-ballot wheeling and dealing. Part 2 of 2.
  • 1968
  • 00:30:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2021

CBC | Radio-Canada Documentary The Style is the Man Himself (Part 1 of 2)

A look at the Liberal leadership campaign in which Pierre Trudeau defeated candidates Lorne Henderson, Eric Kierans, Paul Hellyer, Robert Winters, Mitchell Sharp, Allan MacEachen, Paul Martin, John Turner and Joe Greene. Includes footage of their candidacy announcements, campaigning, convention speeches and between-ballot wheeling and dealing. Part 1 of 2.
  • 1968
  • 01:00:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Obey

The word OBEY does not exist in Indigenous languages. Our ancestors lived by their own systems of governance that sought to maintain harmony among all living things. The concept of obedience was forced upon us by church and government authorities. It slowly took hold and changed both our way of life and our way of governing ourselves. The time has ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Family Names

Where do the surnames O'Bomsawin, Mukash and Ikey come from? In our culture, names are powerful gifts given to us by our ancestors, highlighting a character trait that shows up at birth, or designating a life mission for each of us to embrace. But ever since settlers arrived on our shores, our names have been distorted, or flat-out fabricated. Together, ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories School

For over 150 years, Indian Residential Schools were one of the primary means by which the government assimilated us in order to “kill the Indian in the child.” These compulsory schools shattered our families, our languages and our cultures. This great pain was passed down from generation to generation and impacts our communities to this day. Together, we will decolonize ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Reserve

We lived in balance with nature for thousands of years, inhabiting this land without borders or titles. We were relocated to tiny parcels of land, owned by the Crown, in order for colonial authorities to gain unhindered access to our lands. Today, we still dream about the vastness of our lands and waters. In this episode we'll decolonize the word ...
  • 2021
  • 00:24:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Discovery

70 conversations. 15 Indigenous communities. 11 words with the power to hurt. In this first episode, host Kaniehti:io Horn decolonizes the word, 'discovery'. Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, even Leif Erikson all claimed to have found a 'new' land. But by the time they reached the shores of the Americas, millions of people had already been living here for at least ...
  • 2021
  • 00:22:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Party Lines A residential schools reckoning, again

Elamin and Rosie explore the state of Canada’s path to reconciliation with the help of CBC colleague Duncan McCue. Many people across the country have reacted with shock and horror at the preliminary discovery on the grounds of a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., where the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said they found the potential remains of possibly ...
  • 2021
  • 00:27:51
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 07/13/2021

The National Open for Business

A look at the Free Trade agreement on the eve of its 10th anniversary. How was the 1988 deal put together, what did Canada get and what did we give up? This report includes clips and discussions with the major players in the process, including former prime ministers Brian Mulroney and John Turner. It also looks at the proposed Multilateral Agreement ...
  • 1997
  • 00:35:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/15/2021

News in Review - February 2021 Rewind: The Stories that Made 2020

COVID-19 is the story that everyone will remember from 2020. But there were many other important headline stories that happened in 2020, starting in January when Ukraine Flight 752 was shot down during takeoff from Tehran by an Iranian surface-to-air missile. The year also saw Canada’s largest mass shooting when 22 people were killed by a gunman in Nova Scotia. ...
  • 2021
  • 00:15:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2021

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Library and Archives Canada Tom Longboat is Cogwagee is Everything

In the early 20th century, no spectator sport captivated the world like long distance running. And no runner captured the hearts of Canadians like a Six Nations Indigenous man by the name of Cogwagee in the Onondaga language, or Tom Longboat in English. From his victory at the 1907 Boston Marathon, where he shattered the previous world record by five ...
  • 2019
  • 01:03:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Mackenzie King: Against his Will

William Lyon Mackenzie King was Canada’s longest serving prime minister, an accomplished politician and a prolific writer. He kept an ongoing diary from 1893, until a few days before his death in 1950, in which he wrote down meticulous accounts of his life in politics and fascinating details from his private life. This episode features professor and author Christopher Dummitt, ...
  • 2018
  • 01:01:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Bill Miner: Last of the Old Time Bandits

On May 8, 1906, three armed and masked men held up the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Transcontinental Express at a place called Duck’s Station, 17 miles east of Kamloops in British Columbia. It was a botched robbery to say the least. The bandits ordered the engine and mail car uncoupled, and moved the train a mile down the track. Realizing that ...
  • 2019
  • 01:04:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Francis Mackey and the Halifax Explosion

On the morning of December 6, 1917, Pilot Francis Mackey was guiding the French ship Mont Blanc into the Bedford Basin when, at the narrowest point of the harbour, the Norwegian ship Imo collided with it. The Mont Blanc, laden down with high explosives, caught fire and, about 20 minutes later, exploded. The blast, which was the greatest man-made explosion ...
  • 2019
  • 01:08:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/20/2021

Library and Archives Canada In Flanders Fields: A Century of Poppies

The poem In Flanders Fields — which is over 100 years old — is considered to be the most popular poem from the First World War. This episode features archivist Emily Monks-Leeson from Library and Archives Canada who will guide us through the life of John McCrae, the Canadian soldier who penned the poem. She will help us understand the conditions from ...
  • 2015
  • 00:35:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada Canada's Flag: The Maple Leaf Forever

Canada's flag, with its distinctive maple leaf and bold red-and-white colour scheme has become such a potent symbol for our country that it’s hard to believe it has only been around for 50 years. On February 15, 1965, the new flag flew for the first time on Parliament Hill for all to see, but unveiling the new design was anything ...
  • 2015
  • 00:33:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada The Shamrock and the Fleur-de-Lys

In this episode the Library and Archives Canada team consults a panel of experts about the massive immigration of Irish settlers to Quebec in the 1800s, the journey they undertook to establish their new lives on foreign soil, and the cultural bond that formed between the Irish and the Québécois.
  • 2012
  • 00:38:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

CBC News Looking Back: Sitting Bull's Mountie

The famed Sioux Chief seeks refuge in Canada and is befriended by the Mountie assigned to watch over him.
  • 2001
  • 00:06:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Regina Riot

This is an eyewitness account of the 1935 On-to-Ottawa trek and the riot that ended it.
  • 2001
  • 00:05:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Debden Miracle

Every single soldier from Debden who left to fight in World War II returns safely after the parish priest makes a deal with God.
  • 2001
  • 00:05:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Accidental MLA

Saskatchewan's first female MLA is elected to replace her late husband in the legislature but does little to promote the women's movement.
  • 2001
  • 00:04:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The White Man Governs

The federal government executes eight Indigenous people in Canada's largest mass hanging in order to "teach Indigenous people a lesson."
  • 2001
  • 00:05:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/04/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Missing Recipe

People in Saskatchewan do not know what to do with the salt cod that the Maritimes sent as relief supplies during the Depression.
  • 2001
  • 00:04:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/04/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Birth of Medicare

Saskatchewan doctors go on strike in 1961 to protest the introduction of medicare.
  • 2000
  • 00:05:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/03/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Unionest Party

Two Conservative MLAs from Saskatchewan start the province's first separatist party in 1980, giving the movement some fleeting credibility.
  • 2000
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/28/2021