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Library and Archives Canada Tom Longboat is Cogwagee is Everything

In the early 20th century, no spectator sport captivated the world like long distance running. And no runner captured the hearts of Canadians like a Six Nations Indigenous man by the name of Cogwagee in the Onondaga language, or Tom Longboat in English. From his victory at the 1907 Boston Marathon, where he shattered the previous world record by five ...
  • 2019
  • 01:03:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Mackenzie King: Against his Will

William Lyon Mackenzie King was Canada’s longest serving prime minister, an accomplished politician and a prolific writer. He kept an ongoing diary from 1893, until a few days before his death in 1950, in which he wrote down meticulous accounts of his life in politics and fascinating details from his private life. This episode features professor and author Christopher Dummitt, ...
  • 2018
  • 01:01:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Bill Miner: Last of the Old Time Bandits

On May 8, 1906, three armed and masked men held up the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Transcontinental Express at a place called Duck’s Station, 17 miles east of Kamloops in British Columbia. It was a botched robbery to say the least. The bandits ordered the engine and mail car uncoupled, and moved the train a mile down the track. Realizing that ...
  • 2019
  • 01:04:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Francis Mackey and the Halifax Explosion

On the morning of December 6, 1917, Pilot Francis Mackey was guiding the French ship Mont Blanc into the Bedford Basin when, at the narrowest point of the harbour, the Norwegian ship Imo collided with it. The Mont Blanc, laden down with high explosives, caught fire and, about 20 minutes later, exploded. The blast, which was the greatest man-made explosion ...
  • 2019
  • 01:08:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/20/2021

Library and Archives Canada In Flanders Fields: A Century of Poppies

The poem In Flanders Fields — which is over 100 years old — is considered to be the most popular poem from the First World War. This episode features archivist Emily Monks-Leeson from Library and Archives Canada who will guide us through the life of John McCrae, the Canadian soldier who penned the poem. She will help us understand the conditions from ...
  • 2015
  • 00:35:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada Canada's Flag: The Maple Leaf Forever

Canada's flag, with its distinctive maple leaf and bold red-and-white colour scheme has become such a potent symbol for our country that it’s hard to believe it has only been around for 50 years. On February 15, 1965, the new flag flew for the first time on Parliament Hill for all to see, but unveiling the new design was anything ...
  • 2015
  • 00:33:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada Let us be Canadians: Sir John A. Macdonald

While some aspects of John A. Macdonald's life and legacy remain contentious, most agree that his role in the creation of Canada was paramount. In this episode the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) team explores the life and career of Macdonald with award-winning journalist-historian Arthur Milnes as guide. Also featured is LAC art archivist and curator Madeleine Trudeau, who speaks ...
  • 2015
  • 00:37:45
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada The Shamrock and the Fleur-de-Lys

In this episode the Library and Archives Canada team consults a panel of experts about the massive immigration of Irish settlers to Quebec in the 1800s, the journey they undertook to establish their new lives on foreign soil, and the cultural bond that formed between the Irish and the Québécois.
  • 2012
  • 00:38:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

CBC News Looking Back: Sitting Bull's Mountie

The famed Sioux Chief seeks refuge in Canada and is befriended by the Mountie assigned to watch over him.
  • 2001
  • 00:06:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Regina Riot

This is an eyewitness account of the 1935 On-to-Ottawa trek and the riot that ended it.
  • 2001
  • 00:05:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Debden Miracle

Every single soldier from Debden who left to fight in World War II returns safely after the parish priest makes a deal with God.
  • 2001
  • 00:05:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/08/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Accidental MLA

Saskatchewan's first female MLA is elected to replace her late husband in the legislature but does little to promote the women's movement.
  • 2001
  • 00:04:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The White Man Governs

The federal government executes eight Indigenous people in Canada's largest mass hanging in order to "teach Indigenous people a lesson."
  • 2001
  • 00:05:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/04/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Missing Recipe

People in Saskatchewan do not know what to do with the salt cod that the Maritimes sent as relief supplies during the Depression.
  • 2001
  • 00:04:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/04/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Birth of Medicare

Saskatchewan doctors go on strike in 1961 to protest the introduction of medicare.
  • 2000
  • 00:05:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/03/2021

CBC News Looking Back: The Unionest Party

Two Conservative MLAs from Saskatchewan start the province's first separatist party in 1980, giving the movement some fleeting credibility.
  • 2000
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/28/2021

CBC News Looking Back: Depression Photo

The Fehrs become the poster family for the Depression when their car breaks down in Edmonton on their way home in 1934.
  • 2000
  • 00:03:45
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/27/2021

CBC News Looking Back: Murdered by the RCMP

Estevan-area coal miners fight for better working conditions and run head-long into the trigger-happy RCMP.
  • 1999
  • 00:04:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/27/2021

CBC News Looking Back: White Man's Country

Black migrants from Oklahoma came to Saskatchewan in 1910 only to face the same racism they had been trying to escape.
  • 1999
  • 00:03:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/27/2021

News in Review - December 2020 Lobster Wars: Nova Scotia's Fishery Dispute

Indigenous and non-Indigenous lobster fishers in Nova Scotia are locked in a dispute over the right to fish. Members of the Sipekne'katik First Nation say that the Mi’kmaq people are within their rights to catch and sell lobster to earn a “moderate livelihood” as outlined by a 21-year-old Supreme Court decision. But non-Indigenous fishers say they are breaking the law ...
  • 2020
  • 00:13:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/05/2021

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CBC News Looking Back: Quong Wing

In 1912, a restaurant owner in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, is fined for breaking a law that prohibited Chinese business owners from hiring white women. With the support of the Chinese community, Quong Wing fights the case all the way to the Supreme Court.
  • 1999
  • 00:04:03
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/31/2020

This Hour Has 22 Minutes Mi'kmaq lobster

Lobsters, nature's most delicious excuse to eat a bowl of melted butter. But these sea demons aren't the only ugly thing in Nova Scotia's fisheries.
  • 2020
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/24/2020

Documentary Quebec My Country, Mon Pays

Quebec My Country Mon Pays charts the aftermath of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution in the 1960s. This social justice movement unleashed dramatic cultural and political changes that led to the separatist movement, the FLQ terrorist crisis and, ultimately, the exodus of more than 600,000 English-speaking Quebecers. Montreal-born filmmaker John Walker reveals his own complicated relationship with the province in a film ...
  • 2016
  • 01:23:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/21/2020

CBC Radio One Raid or Liberation

In 1943, unionism came to Sudbury, Ontario in the form of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, also known as Mine Mill. In an organizing drive which set a record, the Mine Mill union signed up a majority of workers within three months. By the time of this program's broadcast 20 years later, workers' wages had trebled, ...
  • 1962
  • 00:50:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/15/2020

News in Review - February 2020 The Montreal Massacre: 30 Years On

On a cold December night 30 years ago, a man walked into Montreal’s École Polytechnique, separated the men from the women and started shooting the women. Fourteen women died that day and 13 others were wounded. In a suicide note, the killer claimed he did it because he hated feminists, whom he held responsible for ruining his life. Thirty years ...
  • 2020
  • 00:16:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/28/2020

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