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The National Aunt Jemima to rebrand, end use of racist stereotype

The Aunt Jemima brand is based on a racist stereotype, but amid mounting criticism its 131-year history is coming to an end.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2020

Jimmy's Food Price Hike Jimmy's Food Price Hike, Episode 2: Wheat, pork, chocolate

Jimmy examines our shrinking chocolate bars, reveals how extreme weather in America is affecting the cost of a loaf of bread and why the price of pork has gone up.
  • 2014
  • 00:48:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/02/2020

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Jimmy's Food Price Hike Jimmy's Food Price Hike, Episode 3: Rice, salmon, beef

Jimmy looks at why the price of salmon, rice and beef have gone up in recent years.
  • 2014
  • 00:48:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/02/2020

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Jimmy's Food Price Hike Jimmy's Food Price Hike, Episode 1: Corn, egg, coffee

Jimmy Doherty uncovers why staple ingredients we take for granted are increasing in price, and why the era of cheap food may be over for good. In this episode Jimmy looks at the growing cost of breakfast and finds out why, in the future, the price of oil might drive up the price of your cornflakes, eggs, corn and coffee. ...
  • 2014
  • 00:48:23
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/30/2020

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CBC News Students Ask CBC News: COVID-19 vs. the flu, spread through food, back to school

In this video, host Carole MacNeil discusses questions from high school students on COVID-19 with Dr. Lisa Barrett from Dalhousie University's Division of Infectious Diseases. This is the fourth in a series of videos that CBC News will be producing to answer questions from students across Canada.Teachers, if you know a high school student with questions about the global pandemic, ...
  • 2020
  • 00:06:25
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/03/2020

CBC News How to handle your groceries during the COVID-19 outbreak

The coronavirus can live up to several days on some surfaces, but experts say there's no reason to worry about the groceries you bring home. CBC News shows you how basic hygiene will keep you safe from your groceries.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/01/2020

CBC News Is food delivery safe during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Andrew Chang looks at whether it's safe to get food delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 2020
  • 00:00:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/01/2020

CBC Kids News Will we run out of food during the coronavirus outbreak?

Have you seen pictures of empty grocery store shelves? That’s because people started stocking up on food and supplies when the government imposed strict rules on social distancing. But people who deliver food to grocery stores and who stock shelves are still working. They’re being extra careful so they don’t spread the coronavirus, but they’re still at work, so we ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:12
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

News in Review - January 2020 Veganism: Meatless Goes Mainstream

Veganism is on the rise. More and more people are opting away from meat towards a plant-based diet. And in Canada it seems British Columbia is leading the way with more vegans per capita than any other province. The popularity of the “Beyond Meat” and “Impossible” burgers has stormed the market in the past few years. And it’s fueled an ...
  • 2020
  • 00:13:21
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/03/2020

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The Nature of Things Food for Thought

We’re fed a lot of advice about our diets and what we shouldn't eat, but half the calories we consume come from ultra-processed starch, sugar, salt, hydrogenated oils, preservatives and additives. These processed foods are tasty and manufactured to make us crave them — but they’re killing us.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The National As Nunavut struggles with food insecurity, students step up to help feed their peers

Food prices in Canada's north are so high that seven out of 10 young people there go hungry. A Nunavut high school is now trying to fight this food insecurity with a free hot lunch program run by the school's food studies class.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/13/2019

The National Canadians get creative in solving food waste problem

CBC News spoke to several businesses to see how they're developing creative solutions and technology to reduce the tons of food that end up in landfills.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Health Canada's new food guide takes a radical overhaul

For the first time in 12 years a new Canada Food Guide is being served. Its goal: get Canadians to eat well. And this time around, Health Canada says the food industry was not involved. Experts say the recommendations made in the food guide are rooted in science, with evidence to back them up. But how do these suggestions fit ...
  • 2019
  • 00:02:35
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/21/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Canada's New Food Guide: Eating Healthier to Live Better

In January 2019 Health Canada released its new revised food guide. It was the first update of the nutritional eating manual in 12 years. Gone is the emphasis on serving sizes and food groups, replaced now with larger portions of fruit and vegetables and more plant-based proteins. The new guide has its fans and its haters. Some praise Health Canada ...
  • 2019
  • 00:15:24
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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News in Review - February 2019 Food's Carbon Footprint: Creating Sustainable Sources

The food we eat is under threat. There's less arable land and more people to feed than ever before. Add to that the fact that everything we produce leaves a carbon footprint. Greenhouse gases are created in the way we grow, harvest, ship, store, package, cook and dispose of the food we eat. So how do we make our food ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2019

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The National How do you feed a world dealing with climate change?

As the planet keeps on warming, new technology aims to mitigate climate change to some extent. However, some warming has already happened. With more to come, people will need to adapt. Consider the stakes in Africa. Countries there already import billions worth of food. If the deserts keep encroaching, if the droughts get worse, feeding people will get harder and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Hydroponic farming looks to offer food stability across Canada

In the wake of yet another romaine lettuce E. coli scare, high-tech hydroponic urban farming is making a case for itself as a made-in-Canada solution for the contamination problem.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:45
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Scientists develop patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli

Scientists at McMaster University are developing a transparent patch to detect meat contaminated with E. coli.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1990s

Dial up the 1990s. After five decades of time travel, the Campus family have made it to the dawn of the Information Age, where the entire world was suddenly available at the click of a mouse and everything seemed possible. The family is tasked to host an at home dinner party inspired by the decade's design and lifestyle icons. They ...
  • 2018
  • 00:43:41
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/27/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1980s

Take a sharp turn into the 1980s. The Campus family enters the decade of big hair, wild fashion and workout wear. For the first time since the series began, the men are sent to the kitchen to bake a quiche. Tristan gets some free time outside of the house and takes in the food trend of the moment – the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:43:41
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/27/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1960s

Swing into the rebellious 1960s. The times they are a-changing for the Campus family as they enter the "Swinging Sixties," with looser attitudes about how to dress, eat and live. Folk icons Sharon Hampson and Bram Morrison (of Canadian music group Sharon, Lois and Bram) share their memories of coffeehouse counterculture with the teens, and later the family celebrates the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:43:40
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/05/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1970s

Enter the contradictory 1970s. The Campus family embraces the earth-tone transformation of their home, right down to the shag carpets and wood panelling. While Tristan remains in charge of the kitchen, she finally gets a bit of help from her husband. The family gathers for the historic '72 Canada / Russia Summit Series and gets the surprise of their lives ...
  • 2018
  • 00:43:41
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/05/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1950s

The affluent 1950s arrive. Like many others, the Campuses are riding the '50s wave of post-war prosperity. They enjoy a number of firsts — new kitchen gadgets, dining out at a restaurant and dinner in front of the TV. Meanwhile, mom Tristan continues to struggle with restrictive gender roles and the pressure for domestic perfection.
  • 2018
  • 00:43:40
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/05/2018

Back in Time for Dinner The 1940s

Welcome to the austere 1940s. In episode 1 of Back in Time for Dinner, the Campus family begin their time-travelling adventure. In the '40s they experience wartime rationing, strict gender roles in the home, technology-free entertainment and a diet lacking in the diversity of food that they are used to.
  • 2018
  • 00:43:40
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/05/2018

The National Fishy foods: Your seafood may not be what it says on the package

There may be something fishy about your seafood — it might not actually be what it says on the package. Oceana Canada, an ocean research charity, is hoping citizen scientists in Halifax armed with DNA kits will help them sniff out seafood fraud. The group estimates as much as 40 per cent of seafood sold in Canada is mislabelled.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018