Filters
Economics  

The National Women and minimum wage

One hundred years after Canada introduced a minimum wage, it's mostly women still stuck at the bottom of the income ladder. And while some call recent minimum wage hikes a good thing, others call them job killers.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/23/2018

The Stats of Life Food

In this episode we meet the statistically average family that can’t seem to make time to eat healthy meals together. Plus, a large family that has 25 people over for dinner every Friday and a couple from the east coast who have so little money that to feed themselves they forage for food, tend a garden and barter for meals ...
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

The Stats of Life Home

In this episode we meet the family with the statistically average home who are looking for ways to increase its value. Plus, a family who bought a huge home now regrets the constant upkeep, and a pair of sisters are looking to buy their first home — right in the middle of a frantic real estate bubble.
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

The Stats of Life Money

In this episode we meet a couple who find that earning the statistically average income still makes it difficult to raise a family. Plus, a woman worth $100 million moves her family into her dream home and a couple making a decent income are so loaded down with debt that they’re considering bankruptcy.
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

News in Review - November 2017 Northern Lifeline: Churchill's Struggle for Survival

Churchill, Manitoba, is located on the west shore of the Hudson Bay and is Canada’s gateway to the North. Historically, it’s been an important port since before the Hudson Bay Company built its first fort there. These days, it’s best known for being the polar bear capital of the world. Despite its tourist reputation, the town is facing incredible hardship. ...
  • 2017
  • 00:14:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2017

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Current Edition subscribers.

More details

The Fifth Estate KPMG and Tax Havens for the Rich: The Untouchables

It was a tax dodge for the wealthy dreamed up by one of the biggest accounting giants in the world. KPMG Canada devised what it called an “Offshore Company Structure” for a select group of rich clients: they would claim to give away millions of dollars to a shell company supposedly out of their control and therefore wouldn’t have to ...
  • 2017
  • 00:45:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/26/2017

Canada: The Story of Us Connected (1824-1890s)

Inventors and entrepreneurs dream of uniting the country through the latest design and technology – and make their fortunes. An extraordinary generation will revolutionize transportation, engineering and communications, making Canada the high-tech superstar of a newly-wired world. Features stories/events include: building the Welland Canal, Cunard steamships, the Victoria Bridge, telegraphy, newspapers. Important note for teachers: This series is intended to ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:16
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

News in Review - September 2017 Cod Moratorium: 25 Years On

When the Canadian government shut down Newfoundland's northern cod fishing industry in 1992 there was an angry outcry. Up until then, fishermen scooped up to 600,000 tonnes of the fish out of the sea every year. But the seas were about to be fished dry – and cod as a species would disappear. CBC's Reg Sherren returns to Newfoundland 25 ...
  • 2017
  • 00:15:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/26/2017

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Current Edition subscribers.

More details

On the Money Should you buy a home?

Kerry Taylor, financial writer on Squawkfox, talks about whether putting dollars into a home makes sense for a first-time buyer.
  • 2017
  • 00:06:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/18/2017

CANAdooDAday Why’s a Loonie Called a Loonie

In this fun rap, a Canadian kid explains to his American friend what a Loonie coin is, what you can do with it, and how it got its name.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:02
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 08/01/2017

The National South Sudan famine: Causes and solutions

The National takes a look at the emerging disaster in the northeast African nation of South Sudan as its people struggle with famine. Featured in this panel discussion: Samantha Nutt, War Child Canada; Brian Stewart, a former foreign correspondent for CBC who covered the 1984 famine in Ethiopia; and Kennedy Jawoko, a journalism professor at Seneca College who was in South ...
  • 2017
  • 00:15:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/02/2017

The National ViewPoint | Canada's most deranged housing market

CBC columnist Robyn Urback says governments need to do something about Toronto's alarming housing market, which is following in the footsteps of Vancouver.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/02/2017

The National ViewPoint | Millennials are not entitled

Lincoln Anthony Blades, a politics and culture writer and a millennial, says young people are anything but lazy and entitled.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/02/2017

The National ViewPoint | The reality of Canadian startups

Technology futurist Jesse Hirsh says it's time to stop incubating dreams of startups that want to sell to big companies and start rewarding startups that want to stay in Canada.
  • 2017
  • 00:03:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 06/01/2017

On the Money Adapting our cities

Jennifer Keesmaat, chief planner and executive director of the City of Toronto, discusses issues such as transit, density and costs with CBC's Peter Armstrong. She stresses the importance of resilient cities that can absorb the shocks of climate change.
  • 2017
  • 00:07:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/01/2017

Marketplace Food waste: What some supermarkets throw out

David Common goes dumpster-diving to reveal how big companies throw good food into dumpsters, part of a $31 billion a year problem in Canada. Some European countries have taken action on supermarket food waste, but Canada doesn't even have a food waste policy. If other countries can do it, why can’t we?
  • 2016
  • 00:22:32
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/31/2017

On the Money Emergency Fund

An emergency fund is supposed to protect you during those "rainy days" — that is, in cases of illness, disaster, job loss or other unexpected events. Are Canadians today prepared for these kinds of financial bumps? This On the Money segment from CBC's Peter Armstrong paints a grim picture of Canadians' average savings.
  • 2016
  • 00:06:58
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/30/2017

News in Review - April 2017 Degrees of Disappointment: Is Higher Education Failing?

Young Canadians are feeling betrayed. They were told that if they went to university and got a good education they would get a secure job and a stable future. But that promise isn’t always coming true these days. Many graduates are ending up in precarious jobs with no future. Nick Purdon looks at the promise of higher education and asks ...
  • 2017
  • 00:15:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/20/2017

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review 2016-2017 subscribers.

More details

Marketplace Cellphone bill busters: How to lower your bill

Canadians are charged some of the highest prices in the world for cellphone service. And when we have a problem, it’s often tough to get it solved. Follow three Canadian consumers who are tired of navigating customer service options and waiting forever on hold. Take advantage of the Marketplace team's inside information: help from a long-time customer service rep and a professional ...
  • 2016
  • 00:22:23
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/18/2017

The National Is Canada ready for an oil spill?

A diesel spill on B.C.'s central coast near Bella Bella could be interpreted as a cautionary tale about Canada's capacity to handle more frequent tanker traffic and to respond adequately to fuel spills. This has become an important consideration, since the expansion of Kinder Morgan's Trans-Mountain Pipeline will significantly increase tanker traffic. In Bella Bella, after thousands of litres of ...
  • 2016
  • 00:10:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/16/2017

The National Harvest of Healing

In Colombia, five decades of war have left the economy struggling, especially in rural areas. But a fruit company with a Canadian connection employs a business model with a social justice approach — everyone who grows the fruit or works in the factory has been victimized by war.
  • 2016
  • 00:08:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/12/2017

The Exchange Jobs at Risk from Automation

CBC's Havard Gould talks with Sean Mullin of the Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E) about how robotics and artificial intelligence could eliminate a huge number of Canadian jobs. They discuss career tips to avoid finding oneself among the 42% of Canada's workforce that may be replaced by automation over the next 10 to 20 years.
  • 2016
  • 00:05:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/05/2016

The Exchange Young Canadians: Funding the Future

Paul Kershaw, founder of Generation Squeeze, is a UBC professor and leading thinker on generational inequality in Canada. He talks with CBC's Peter Armstrong about how Canada Pension Plan reforms will affect young people and their future plans for retirement.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/05/2016

CBC News Now Brexit Aftermath: Britain's Uncertain Future

Elmer Kim and Michael Hyatt discuss Britain's divorce from the European Union from a Canadian business perspective.
  • 2016
  • 00:09:43
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/05/2016

The National The Brexit Debate: A Nation Divided

Margaret Evans takes a look at the history of the EU, the impact of that tumultuous relationship in Britain and what happens if it ends — all from the point of view of British people who are deeply divided about their future.
  • 2016
  • 00:11:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/20/2016