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Endangered languages -- Canada  

Unreserved Speaking Ojibwe an 'act of defiance' says 19-year-old language teacher

Aandeg Muldrew, 19, is the University of Manitoba's youngest sessional instructor, teaching introductory Ojibwe. Muldrew, who lives in Winnipeg, started learning the language from his grandmother when he was 10. Given the history of languages lost after colonization and residential schools, speaking the language is "almost like an act of defiance," he says. Speaking Ojibwe is a way of "reconciling ...
  • 2018
  • 00:08:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

CBC Radio One More than Words

More than Words is a set of stories that looks at why Indigenous languages matter. These stories introduce people determined to reawaken the many languages across the country. Produced in partnership with the Reporting in Indigenous Communities course at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.
  • 2018
  • 00:49:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

On the Coast Khelsilem on Indigenous language funding

Dustin Rivers — also know as Khelsilem — says additional funding for Indigenous language revitalization is a good move by the B.C. government. Khelsilem is a councillor with the Squamish First Nation and a lecturer in Indigenous Languages at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby. He is also the man behind a language immersion program offered by SFU that teaches Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh ...
  • 2018
  • 00:07:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/06/2018

The National Words of the Elders: Saving Aboriginal Languages

Arvid Charlie is among the last generation raised speaking Hul'qumi'num, the Coast Salish language spoken by the Cowichan people in BC. Like most of the 88 aboriginal languages in Canada, Hul'qumi'num is teetering on the brink of extinction. For elders like Arvid, sharing and documenting the language is a race against time. Their work embraces new technologies so that the ...
  • 2009
  • 00:13:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

News in Review - October 2002 Survival of the Inuktitut Language

Through the forces of modernization, the Inuit in Northern Canada are losing their language. We follow attempts to connect people from all areas where Inuktitut is spoken in a campaign to revitalize and preserve their native means of communication.
  • 2002
  • 00:14:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2002

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