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The Nature of Things Myth or Science: The Power of Poo

Dr. Jennifer Gardy lifts the lid on poop to discover if it’s myth or science that we’re flushing a valuable resource down the toilet. Every year, worldwide, we produce nine billion kilograms of the stuff — six metric tons each over our lifetime. From human poo to animal poo, researchers are embracing the brown stuff. They believe it’s scientific gold, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/17/2018

The National Drinking bottled water could be bad for your health

Drinking bottled water could be bad for your health. A CBC Marketplace investigation found that many Canadian bottled water brands contain microplastics. Those microplastics can enter a human's bloodstream and stay there, however the potential impact on people hasn't been studied.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

The National How your lifestyle is making recycling unsustainable | Reduce, Reuse, Rethink

Our changing lifestyle is making the standard “blue box recycling” unsustainable as communities struggle to adapt to more plastics and fewer newspapers. New composite plastics are harder to recycle so new technologies are needed — and that means higher costs for local governments.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:45
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

The National Where is the world's waste going? | The Question

Where is the world's waste going? That's the focus of the latest edition of The Question. With China ending its program to take in the world’s waste, it has to go somewhere else. The National takes a look at how countries like Sweden and Germany have introduced incentives for people to return their waste.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:01
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

The National Rethink the way you recycle

Rethinking the way you recycle is the focus of CBC News series Reduce, Reuse and Rethink. It explores why Canadian communities are at a turning point when it comes to recycling and exploring ways to do it better. Much of the reason is because of a decision by China to crack down on foreign waste. About half of the world's recyclables ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:46
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

News in Review - April 2018 Water Scarcity: Are we Facing ​a​ Global Crisis?

Water is more than a free resource that falls from the sky – it is essential to human survival. In Canada, we live in a country abundant with clean, fresh drinkable water but that’s not so for about two billion people around the world. What happens when it becomes scarce? With climate change and growing populations, some places are running ...
  • 2018
  • 00:19:48
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/19/2018

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The Passionate Eye Wasted! The Story of Food Waste

What if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. In the U.S., that’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion ...
  • 2017
  • 01:26:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/17/2018

The National Preventing Jordan's water crisis: How tech can help

A new project is trying to help Jordan prevent a water crisis. Water from the Red Sea would be desalinated and used in communities in southern Jordan and Israel.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/11/2018

The National Water crisis: What's the best solution? | The Question

Cape Town isn't the only city facing a water crisis — in fact many around the world have been trying to find ways to conserve the invaluable resource; that led CBC News to ask: is there a best solution to solving a water crisis? And if not, who's doing it best?
  • 2018
  • 00:03:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/11/2018

The National Canadian Indigenous girl makes safe water plea to UN in New York

Wikwemikong First Nation representative Autumn Peltier spoke to General Assembly.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:47
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/11/2018

The National The teen fighting to protect Canada's water — meet Autumn Peltier

She is the teen fighting to protect Canada's water — meet 13-year-old Canadian Autumn Peltier. She speaks bravely, confidently and passionately, and as a so-called water walker, Peltier pleaded with Justin Trudeau to protect Canada’s water. Now she is gearing up to speak at the United Nations for World Water Day.
  • 2018
  • 00:07:53
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/11/2018

The National Clean water a luxury no more for remote First Nation

Clean water will no longer be a luxury for a remote First Nation in northwestern Ontario, because for the first time in more than a decade, the community has a water treatment plant. Fixing First Nations' water problems has been a major promise from the Liberal government — but this is just one solution for one of the dozens of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2018

News in Review - January 2018 Facing Extinction: What’s Killing the Mysterious Right Whale?

2017 was the deadliest year on record for North American right whales since they became a protected species over 80 years ago. Through the summer, 15 right whales were discovered dead — most in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This magnificent and mysterious animal is already facing extinction with fewer than 500 of the species left in the world. So ...
  • 2018
  • 00:11:33
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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The Nature of Things What Trees Talk About

This stunning documentary explores the secret life of trees, and how the world’s last great forest has the power to shape not only the lives of the plants and animals that live within it but our lives and life across the entire globe. Using a "science in action" approach, the film takes a fascinating journey into the heart of the ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/11/2017

#StandForCanada #StandForCanada Youth Challenge: Grade 5/6 students at Tawingo College

This video was created by Grade 5/6 students in Ms. White's class at Tawingo College in Huntsville, Ontario, for our #StandForCanada Youth Challenge. Catch their Canada 150 spirit as they show their love of the great outdoors and care for their environment.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:52
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 12/05/2017

The Nature of Things Into the Fire

Nature created it. Humans harnessed it. And now, as climate change helps light a flame to our forests, scientists are desperately trying to understand fire. In the summer of 2017, more than one million hectares of the B.C. landscape went up in smoke. In 2016, the Fort McMurray wildfire — known as “the Beast” — forced the evacuation of nearly ...
  • 2017
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2017

The Wild Canadian Year Making The Wild Canadian Year

Watch the incredible feats of endurance and technical wizardry needed to capture the sequences featured in the landmark series The Wild Canadian Year, winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/09/2017

The Nature of Things White Wolves: Ghosts of the Arctic

At Canada’s northernmost edge lies a remote and barren wilderness, where few animals are tough enough to survive: Ellesmere Island. Ghosts of the Arctic follows a family of wolves as they struggle to raise their pups in this unforgiving environment. Set within a stunning landscape of snow-capped mountains and ice-locked fjords, this documentary offers a glimpse into a world that’s rarely been ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/24/2017

The Nature of Things Dad and the Dandelions

A filmmaker tries to unlock the mystery behind his father's blood cancer, Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. Is there a connection to golf's manicured perfection? In the world of pearl white bunkers and velvety putting greens, Andrew Nisker discovers that these “greenspaces” are anything but. Along the way he meets numerous experts including Jay Feldman, urban planner and Executive Director of the non-profit ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/24/2017

News in Review - October 2017 Extreme Storms: 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season

The Atlantic hurricane season of 2017 will ultimately be one for the record books. Not for having the most hurricanes in a season, but as possibly the strongest hurricane month ever recorded. Five major hurricanes formed, with three making their way to shore – two as top-rated Category 5 storms. They came in quick succession and brought devastating winds and ...
  • 2017
  • 00:16:23
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/18/2017

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The Wild Canadian Year Winter

Lynx hunt snowshoe hares in the boreal forest and the ancient dance between wolves and caribou on Canada’s vast tundra reveal the harshest time of year when landscapes are transformed by the cruel and dramatic beauty of snow and ice. Winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:12
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/17/2017

The Wild Canadian Year Fall

Fall chronicles a remarkable season of change — young northern gannets leap off perilous cliffs as chipmunks race to gather winter supplies, and prairie rattlesnakes give birth to live young. Winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:56
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/17/2017

The Wild Canadian Year Summer

Killer whales and blue sharks are on the hunt and amorous fireflies light up the night forest with their dazzling display as summer reveals Canada’s landscape at the peak of its splendour. Winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:56
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/17/2017

The Wild Canadian Year Spring

The first days of spring sees Arctic fox pups take their first steps and black bear cubs learn to climb trees after the long cold days of winter, while female caribou make the dangerous trek to reach their calving grounds. Winner of the inaugural Rob Stewart Award for Science and Nature Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:55
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/17/2017

News in Review - September 2017 Cod Moratorium: 25 Years On

When the Canadian government shut down Newfoundland's northern cod fishing industry in 1992 there was an angry outcry. Up until then, fishermen scooped up to 600,000 tonnes of the fish out of the sea every year. But the seas were about to be fished dry – and cod as a species would disappear. CBC's Reg Sherren returns to Newfoundland 25 ...
  • 2017
  • 00:15:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/26/2017

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