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Evolution (Biology)  

The Nature of Things First Animals

For most of its existence, planet Earth has been a brutal, inhospitable, toxic nightmare, until a half billion years ago when – KABOOM! – life suddenly appeared. First Animals takes you back to the Cambrian Explosion through newly-discovered fossils that tell us more about our own origins. Renowned evolutionary biologist Maydianne Andrade is our guide, showing us how complex – and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/17/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Puijila, the “walking” seal

A Canadian Museum of Nature scientist discovers evolutionary evidence of a mammal transforming to “return” to the sea. An amazing fossil from the Arctic of 20 million years ago, Puijila darwini is a land animal that links to the origin of seals.
  • 2009
  • 00:04:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/18/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Arctic fossil forest of 50 million years ago

Fossil sites in the Arctic from about 50 million years ago provide a glimpse of life that evolved in the tropical forest under extreme greenhouse conditions. The Arctic was a warm, wet, swampy, forested place 50 million years ago. Ellesmere Island is a key fossil site in Canada's High Arctic, where the remains of unique mammal species can tell us ...
  • 2011
  • 00:03:36
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/13/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature The return of Tiktaalik, the fish with legs!

The amazing ancient fish with limbs, Tiktaalik roseae, is now back in Canada. See the fossils and hear from the American scientists who discovered them in 2004 in the Canadian Arctic. Tiktaalik will be preserved in the fossil collections of the Canadian Museum of Nature on behalf of the Government of Nunavut.
  • 2015
  • 00:02:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/12/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Tiktaalik, the 350-million-year-old "walking fish"

An amazing fossil find on Ellesmere Island in Canada’s Arctic leads to the earliest evidence of the ancestor of all limbed animals.
  • 2019
  • 00:01:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/12/2019

Canadian Museum of Nature Camel discovery in High Arctic

Who knew camels originate from the Americas and lived in the Arctic? An amazing discovery in Canada’s Arctic reveals a camel that lived on Ellesmere Island about 3.5 million years ago. New insight into camel evolution comes from an amazing discovery of bones from the leg of an extinct giant camel in Canada's High Arctic. Natalia Rybczynski, Ph.D., a palaeobiologist ...
  • 2013
  • 00:03:58
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/12/2019

Quirks & Quarks Between Man and Beast: The Gorilla and the Victorians

Until about 150 years ago, the gorilla was considered a mythical beast. No European had ever seen one, and its very existence was only rumoured. All that changed, however, when a young, unknown French explorer named Paul du Chaillu turned up in London in 1861 with a load of gorilla skeletons and stuffed gorillas skins that he had collected in ...
  • 2014
  • 00:14:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/10/2014

Quirks & Quarks Cows Give Daughters More Milk

Many human parents try hard to treat their sons and daughters equally. But when it comes to making milk, many mammals can be a bit unfair. Cows, for example, make significantly more milk for their daughters than their sons. Dr. Katie Hinde, an evolutionary biologist at Harvard University, discovered this, when she and her colleagues examined millions of dairy records. ...
  • 2014
  • 00:08:49
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/06/2014

The Nature of Things One Ocean: The Birth of an Ocean

More than four billion years ago, the most important event in Earth’s history took place — the ocean was born. It completely transformed the planet, creating a watery oasis that gave rise to the air we breathe, our climate, and a stunning array of life, including the critical species that first crawled out of the sea to inhabit land. The ...
  • 2009
  • 00:43:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The Nature of Things The Burgess Shale: Impressions of Life

They were the first animals on earth. All animals today, including the human species, go back in a direct line of descent to those first ancestors. Traces of these first animals have been beautifully preserved in fossils from a deposit in British Columbia, high in the Rocky Mountains in Yoho National Park. It's known as the Burgess Shale.
  • 1992
  • 00:46:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013