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CBC News Smoking or vaping may increase risk of severe coronavirus infection

There's a growing body of research linking vaping, smoking cigarettes and cannabis to an increased risk of COVID-19 infection, serious illness and death rates.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:07
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2020

CBC News What we actually know about the coronavirus

Information about the coronavirus outbreak is spreading fast, but what do we actually know about the illness? CBC News medical contributor and family physician Dr. Peter Lin breaks down the facts about what it is, where it came from, how it spreads and what you can do to protect yourself.
  • 2020
  • 00:05:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/01/2020

The National Flattening the curve: How to slow down coronavirus spread

Graph shows how new cases of COVID-19 can quickly overwhelm a health-care system if precautions aren't taken.
  • 2020
  • 00:00:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/31/2020

CBC Kids News Can I go outside during the coronavirus outbreak?

Unsure whether or not you should be going outside right now? The short answer is yes — fresh air and exercise are important. But you should take some extra steps to make sure you’re staying safe. Many people are practicing social distancing to help prevent the spread of the virus. And some people are self-isolating because they have been — ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:22
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC News Canadians cautioned not to believe hype around prevention or cures for coronavirus

Health Canada warns it's illegal to make false claims or sell unauthorized health products related to COVID-19.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC Kids News Why are schools closed for the coronavirus?

Extended March Break? Sweet! Or not? Some schools in Canada are shutting down to keep the coronavirus from spreading quickly. Even though kids who get the coronavirus are experiencing really mild symptoms, they can spread it, and that puts a strain on the health care system. If your school closes, you might still have homework and there will be plenty ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:11
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC Kids News What is physical distancing?

We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social while still staying apart from each ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:35
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

The National Family doctor uses lessons learned during SARS during COVID-19 pandemic

Dr. Javed Alloo started practicing medicine during the SARS outbreak and is reminded he learned an important lesson from a patient who survived.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC News How to properly disinfect at home for COVID-19

CBC's Nicole Williams demonstrates the best advice for cleaning to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC Kids News What is flattening the curve?

Health officials keep talking about flattening the curve. Charlotte and Jimmy Greig, from Guelph, Ont., wanted to know what that means. Basically, it means people still get sick with the coronavirus, but over a longer period of time instead of all at once. That way, doctors are able to treat everyone who needs help, instead of having to deal with ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:22
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News What does it mean to be self-isolated?

What does it mean to be self-isolated? It’s all about reducing the spread of the coronavirus. Have you heard about people being self-isolated because of the coronavirus? It’s happening more and more, including to our prime minister and his wife. Watch the video to find out what it means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:07
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News What is social distancing?

Have you been told not to hug or touch your friends? That’s called social distancing. Why are we talking about this now? Some public health officials are encouraging social distancing as a way to keep the coronavirus from spreading. Check out this video for more on what that means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:23
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic?

Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic? It means it’s new and it’s spreading around the world. At first the coronavirus was called an outbreak. Then, on March 11, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced it was going to start calling it a pandemic. What’s a pandemic? A pandemic is a new virus that’s infecting a lot of people. It ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:06
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

The Truth About... The Truth About HIV

HIV/AIDS has claimed 34 million lives worldwide. But now, even though stigma remains, a diagnosis is no longer a death sentence. This inspiring film looks at the science keeping HIV at bay and examines the moral panic that erupted when the virus first took hold. There are interviews from prominent figures including HIV awareness campaigner HRH Prince Harry, Sir Elton ...
  • 2017
  • 00:52:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/05/2020

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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Louis Theroux Talking to Anorexia

Anorexia, the pathological fear of eating and gaining weight, is now the most deadly mental illness in the UK, affecting around one in every 250 women at some point in their lives. In recent years, the number of people being admitted to hospital because of their condition has risen dramatically, but with many struggling to make a full recovery, being ...
  • 2017
  • 00:59:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/04/2020

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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Louis Theroux Mothers on the Edge

Louis Theroux returns to the UK to spend time in specialist psychiatric units which treat mothers experiencing serious mental illness while allowing them to live alongside their babies. Immersing himself on the wards, he meets women who have been admitted with a range of serious conditions – including depression, anxiety and psychosis – often triggered by birth or the strains ...
  • 2019
  • 00:59:09
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 03/04/2020

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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News in Review - November 2019 Vaping Alert: Are E-Cigarettes Really Safe?

E-cigarettes were designed to help smokers quit, but they’ve turned into a popular habit for many young people. Teens are enticed by the flavours, colours and allure of the product. But a growing number are falling ill with lung-related issues, and in the United States several have died. While no one product or ingredient has been linked to the illnesses, ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2019

The Code Using patterns in Google searches to predict flu outbreaks

Marcus du Sautoy explores how internet searches are building up a huge database of linked information which can then be mined for patterns. Visiting Google’s offices, he sees this at work and reveals just how closely Google can predict flu outbreaks, even before hospitals have begun to need to respond to them. Flu kills hundreds of thousands each year, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:02
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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The Nature of Things Food for Thought

We’re fed a lot of advice about our diets and what we shouldn't eat, but half the calories we consume come from ultra-processed starch, sugar, salt, hydrogenated oils, preservatives and additives. These processed foods are tasty and manufactured to make us crave them — but they’re killing us.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The Nature of Things Something in the Air

For a Canadian family living in Beijing, putting on face-masks to guard against smog is part of the morning routine. In China, air pollution causes more than 3,000 premature deaths every day. And cities across Asia and Europe — including London and Paris — now have to ban downtown traffic to manage their “Airpocalypse” days. But what about here at ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The National Why teens aren't getting enough sleep

A number of U.S. school boards plan to start classes later so students will be more alert. CBC's Duncan McCue revisits the stories of the young and the sleepless.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Loneliness: The New Silent Killer

More people are lonely than ever before. Studies show that one in five Canadians identify as being lonely. Loneliness is more than a feeling of occasional solitude – it’s a prolonged feeling of perceived isolation. While long seen as being bad for mental health, loneliness is now recognized as being physically harmful too. It's being called the silent killer – ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

The National Meet the students trying to battle the vaping 'epidemic'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading national public health institute of the United States, calls it an epidemic: the growing and now unprecedented number of teens using e-cigarettes. It's become a big problem in schools across Canada as well, and now some students are taking matters into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Canada's mental health courts: How they work and why they exist

Canada has mental health courts that differ from normal courts, though much of the public is unaware they exist. CBC's senior investigative correspondent Diana Swain got a rare look inside proceedings at a Nova Scotia mental health court to find out how it operates and why they exist.
  • 2018
  • 00:09:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019