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News in Review - November 2019 Vaping Alert: Are E-Cigarettes Really Safe?

E-cigarettes were designed to help smokers quit, but they’ve turned into a popular habit for many young people. Teens are enticed by the flavours, colours and allure of the product. But a growing number are falling ill with lung-related issues, and in the United States several have died. While no one product or ingredient has been linked to the illnesses, ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2019

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The Code Using patterns in Google searches to predict flu outbreaks

Marcus du Sautoy explores how internet searches are building up a huge database of linked information which can then be mined for patterns. Visiting Google’s offices, he sees this at work and reveals just how closely Google can predict flu outbreaks, even before hospitals have begun to need to respond to them. Flu kills hundreds of thousands each year, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:02
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Nature of Things Food for Thought

We’re fed a lot of advice about our diets and what we shouldn't eat, but half the calories we consume come from ultra-processed starch, sugar, salt, hydrogenated oils, preservatives and additives. These processed foods are tasty and manufactured to make us crave them — but they’re killing us.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The Nature of Things Something in the Air

For a Canadian family living in Beijing, putting on face-masks to guard against smog is part of the morning routine. In China, air pollution causes more than 3,000 premature deaths every day. And cities across Asia and Europe — including London and Paris — now have to ban downtown traffic to manage their “Airpocalypse” days. But what about here at ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The National Why teens aren't getting enough sleep

A number of U.S. school boards plan to start classes later so students will be more alert. CBC's Duncan McCue revisits the stories of the young and the sleepless.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Loneliness: The New Silent Killer

More people are lonely than ever before. Studies show that one in five Canadians identify as being lonely. Loneliness is more than a feeling of occasional solitude – it’s a prolonged feeling of perceived isolation. While long seen as being bad for mental health, loneliness is now recognized as being physically harmful too. It's being called the silent killer – ...
  • 2019
  • 00:19:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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The National Meet the students trying to battle the vaping 'epidemic'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading national public health institute of the United States, calls it an epidemic: the growing and now unprecedented number of teens using e-cigarettes. It's become a big problem in schools across Canada as well, and now some students are taking matters into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Canada's mental health courts: How they work and why they exist

Canada has mental health courts that differ from normal courts, though much of the public is unaware they exist. CBC's senior investigative correspondent Diana Swain got a rare look inside proceedings at a Nova Scotia mental health court to find out how it operates and why they exist.
  • 2018
  • 00:09:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National B.C. measles outbreak has some kids taking their health into their own hands

Some 33 students and staff at the centre of a measles outbreak in Vancouver have been ordered to stay home because they haven't provided proof of vaccination. This has some B.C. kids taking their health into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

The National Health Canada's new food guide takes a radical overhaul

For the first time in 12 years a new Canada Food Guide is being served. Its goal: get Canadians to eat well. And this time around, Health Canada says the food industry was not involved. Experts say the recommendations made in the food guide are rooted in science, with evidence to back them up. But how do these suggestions fit ...
  • 2019
  • 00:02:35
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/21/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Sleep Deprivation: Canada's Latest Epidemic

About a third of Canadian adults say they get less than the recommended eight hours of sleep per night. And for teens, it's just as bad – more than half get much less than the eight to 10 hours per night of recommended shut eye. So why is sleep so important? Studies show that sleep is necessary to recharge, improve ...
  • 2019
  • 00:20:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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News in Review - March 2019 Canada's New Food Guide: Eating Healthier to Live Better

In January 2019 Health Canada released its new revised food guide. It was the first update of the nutritional eating manual in 12 years. Gone is the emphasis on serving sizes and food groups, replaced now with larger portions of fruit and vegetables and more plant-based proteins. The new guide has its fans and its haters. Some praise Health Canada ...
  • 2019
  • 00:15:24
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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The National How changing language could help in the fight against opioids

If you had any doubt about whether Canada's opioid crisis was getting better or worse, the latest numbers tell a big part of that story: it's still out of control. More than 9,000 people died between January 2016 and June 2018. There's a lot of talk about how to turn things around, but there may be another side to it ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/11/2019

The National New lens on life: using photography to heal from trauma

Suicide rates for Indigenous youth in Canada are up to seven times higher than for other young people. A remote community in northern Saskatchewan has been hit particularly hard in recent years, but now they're trying to change that, by discovering the healing power of photography.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

Enquête Breast implants: The trouble is under the skin

Thousands of Canadian women have had silicone breast implant surgery. Apart from some known complications, next-generation implants, approved by Health Canada in 2006, were said to be safe. Yet in recent years thousands of women have had their implants removed because of various problems. New studies have shown that silicone implants are linked to the development of autoimmune diseases and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:40:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/11/2019

The National Doctor fears future 'epidemic' of long-term vaping effects

A new generation is getting hooked on nicotine, and doctors say there are alarming similarities between the past popularity of cigarettes and the current vaping trend.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/08/2019

The National After the bullet: Helping gun violence victims suffering in silence

The shooting death of a 22-year-old in north Toronto marks the city's 89th homicide this year, matching a grim record that has stood unbroken for nearly three decades. The city is now being forced to confront some ugly truths about the root cause of gun violence. This includes how it deals with the hundreds of survivors it sees every year, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/07/2019

The National Choosing death earlier than planned

A Nova Scotia woman who has chosen a medically assisted death says Canada's new law is too extreme and unfair. She says she's now forced to make the difficult choice to end her life earlier than she'd like.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Vision Zero: Making City Roads Safer

City roads are designed for vehicles. But the modern cultural push for pedestrian-friendly cities and increased bike paths means there’s a war raging on the streets. Unfortunately, pedestrian and bicycle fatalities are on the rise. In an effort to combat this, many cities have adopted a road safety program called Vision Zero. Launched in Sweden, this program helps marry pedestrians, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:15:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/17/2018

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The National Parents prepare to protect kids from pot

Health Canada is outlining the potential risks and providing advice to parents looking to talk to their children about marijuana use.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2018

The National Smoke suffocates B.C., poses significant health risk

Health officials say even short exposure to the smoke can have wide-ranging effects: from headaches and dizziness to reduced birth weight for babies who are exposed while in the womb.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:16
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/11/2018

The National Driving high: Preventing impaired driving a focus for authorities

A Statistics Canada report found one in seven pot users surveyed said they had driven within two hours of using pot.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

CBC News Do refugee claimants automatically get access to our hospitals and doctors?

The short answer is yes. The CBC’s Vik Adhopia describes the different types of health benefits refugee claimants get in Canada.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2018

CBC News Can Canada’s health care system cope with immigration?

Canada’s universal health care system makes it an attractive place to live, but it’s not perfect. Can it cope with tens of thousands of new immigrants?
  • 2017
  • 00:01:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2018