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News in Review - January 2019 Sir John A. Macdonald: A Legacy of Controversy

Sir John A. Macdonald has become a controversial figure in modern times. Of course, he was Canada’s first prime minister, responsible for bringing about Confederation and building a rail line across the country. But in this era of truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, his image has become a symbol of oppression to some. It was his policies that saw ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/30/2019

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The National Saskatchewan's apology for Sixties Scoop leaves survivors with mixed feelings

Starting in the 1950s, about 20,000 Indigenous children across Canada were seized from their birth families and relocated to non-Indigenous homes, where many were stripped of their language, culture and any ties to their families. For some, the apology was long overdue and welcomed. For others, the words rang hollow.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Sixties Scoop survivors split on proposed $875-million settlement

Advocates say the deal can give closure to the affected families, but critics say the amounts for survivors are too small, there were no national hearings, and the deal should have included Métis survivors, not just First Nations.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/11/2018

Unreserved Speaking Ojibwe an 'act of defiance' says 19-year-old language teacher

Aandeg Muldrew, 19, is the University of Manitoba's youngest sessional instructor, teaching introductory Ojibwe. Muldrew, who lives in Winnipeg, started learning the language from his grandmother when he was 10. Given the history of languages lost after colonization and residential schools, speaking the language is "almost like an act of defiance," he says. Speaking Ojibwe is a way of "reconciling ...
  • 2018
  • 00:08:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

CBC News #Beyond94 – Why language is vital for this Inuk residential school survivor

Inuk residential school survivor Jack Anawak once fired back at a fellow MP who criticized his speaking Inuktitut in the House of Commons.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/18/2018

CBC News #Beyond94 – From residential school to one of Manitoba's first Indigenous nurses

Ann Callahan began residential school in the 1930s at age four. Despite facing challenges she pursued higher education, becoming one of the first Indigenous nurses in Manitoba.
  • 2018
  • 00:07:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/18/2018

CBC News #Beyond94 – Visit this Mi'kmaq immersion school in Nova Scotia

Eskasoni, Nova Scotia is taking steps to preserve its Indigenous language among the next generation.
  • 2018
  • 00:10:50
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/18/2018

CBC Docs POV Birth of a Family

Three sisters and a brother, adopted as infants into separate families, meet together for the first time in this deeply moving documentary. Removed from their young Dene mother’s care as part of Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop, Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie and Ben were four of the 20,000 Indigenous children taken from their families between 1955 and 1985, to be either ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/29/2017

The National Jesuits, First Nations Participate in Reconciliation Canoe Trip

After learning about the Jesuit residential schools in Ontario, a priest in training organized a canoe trip with Indigenous, Jesuit and lay participants with the goal of reconciliation.
  • 2017
  • 00:10:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/23/2017

8th Fire Lighting the 8th Fire

In this 8th Fire Dispatch, Anishinaabe activist, scholar and mother Leanne Simpson explains the "8th Fire" prophecy and what needs to happen in the relationship between Indigenous people and Canada before it can be lit. Simpson is the author of Lighting the 8th Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence and Protection of Indigenous Nations and Dancing On Our Turtle's Back: Stories of ...
  • 2012
  • 00:06:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/25/2017

News in Review - October 2017 Violence in Virginia: The Rise of the Alt-Right

In August 2017 a quaint college town in Virginia became the epicentre of America’s cultural and racial divide. White nationalists clashed violently with counter protesters. One woman died after a car was deliberately driven into the crowds. Dozens were injured. But what led to this seeming re-emergence of virulent racism and white supremacy? And is this strictly an American problem? ...
  • 2017
  • 00:19:07
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/18/2017

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Canadian History: A Conversation Treaties, Reconciliation and Indigenous History in Canada

How well do Canadians know Indigenous history? What role did treaties play in forming our country? Are the stories told through truth and reconciliation changing our understanding of Canadian history? Moderated by award-winning journalist Duncan McCue, host of Cross Country Checkup on CBC Radio, the panel includes Ry Moran, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation; Cynthia Wesley-Eskuimaux, Lakehead University; and Eldon Yellowhorn, ...
  • 2017
  • 00:54:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

The Current Senator Lynn Beyak’s remarks 'like a slap in the face': Matilda Wilson

Matilda Wilson, a residential school survivor from Smithers, B.C., rose to speak at a public forum hosted by CBC's The Current. She called Senator Lynn Beyak's comments in defence of the "well-intentioned" people who ran the residential school system "a slap in the face." Wilson shared her own experience being taken to a residential school in 1956, as well as the ...
  • 2017
  • 00:01:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2017

The Current Why don't residential school survivors just get over it?: Murray Sinclair

To those who ask why Indigenous people don't just "get over" the residential school experience, Senator Murray Sinclair has this response: "My answer has always been: Why can't you always remember this?" Sinclair was speaking at one of The Current's public forums on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG).
  • 2017
  • 00:01:32
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2017

The National John A. Macdonald's Complicated Legacy

John A. Macdonald's complicated legacy is sparking heated debated over whether to remove his name from schools. Many Canadians are asking, how do we honour Canada's first prime minister while acknowledging his role in creating residential schools?
  • 2017
  • 00:09:43
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/11/2017

We Are Canada We Are Canada, Episode 6

Putting seed production back in the hands of the small farmer; preserving the stories of residential school survivors; and building cameras for a new frontier of ocean discovery. In this episode: Adam Gobi, Jane Rabinowicz and Ry Moran.  
  • 2017
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/25/2017

News in Review - September 2015 Residential School Shame: The TRC Report

In the 19th century the Canadian government set up the residential school system as a way to teach English and Christianity to Aboriginal children. Successive generations were taken from their families and put in boarding schools run by churches. Over the years, many of the children suffered physical, mental and even sexual abuse. Many died. In 2008 the Truth and ...
  • 2015
  • 00:18:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/18/2015

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The National Justice Murray Sinclair Interview

CBC's chief correspondent Peter Mansbridge talks with Justice Murray Sinclair, who heads the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. After just over six years, and the work of recording the statements of over 7,200 residential school survivors, he discusses what Canada needs to do next.
  • 2015
  • 00:13:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/10/2015

The National Rex Murphy: Truth and Reconciliation Report

Rex Murphy emphasizes the importance of the Canadian government taking measurable action on the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. He predicts voters will make this a central issue in the 2015 federal election and expect all parties to have a detailed plan to address the myriad ongoing issues for Aboriginal communities.
  • 2015
  • 00:03:19
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 07/06/2015

News in Review - September 2010 Residential Schools: Truth and Healing

For more than 100 years many native children were taken away from their families and forced to stay at residential schools. Two years ago, the Canadian government apologized for the suffering and the abuse many experienced. Now a Truth and Reconciliation Commission is hearing from some of those affected. In this News in Review story, we look at the work ...
  • 2010
  • 00:18:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/07/2014

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Ideas The Enright Files: Aboriginal Canadians and What Society Owes

In conversation with Judge Murray Sinclair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and six longtime observers of the situation facing Aboriginal Canadians, Michael Enright asks if Canada can ever get this situation right.
  • 2010
  • 00:54:00
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/14/2014

8th Fire Indigenous in the City

In the opening episode of the four-part series 8th Fire, host Wab Kinew, from the Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation in Northern Ontario, and now a Winnipeg-based TV journalist, invites us to come "meet the neighbours." It's about time, since many Canadians say they have never met an Aboriginal person. This vibrant kaleidoscopic hour introduces a diverse cast of Indigenous characters ...
  • 2012
  • 00:43:25
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The National Stolen Children

After decades of waiting, Aboriginal Canadians received a formal apology from the federal government on June 11, 2008. This landmark event in Canadian history recognized the loss of culture caused by the church-run residential schools that thousands of Aboriginal children were forced to attend. It also acknowledged the physical and sexual abuse that many suffered in those institutions. Stolen Children explores the ...
  • 2008
  • 00:48:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The National Residential Schools

Native Canadians are demanding the federal government act on recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Among the many recommendations is one that would redress a terrible injustice: residential schools. Native Canadians want to heal the wounds inflicted by those schools, but they say that can't happen until the government apologizes for its involvement and accepts responsibility. Many Native ...
  • 1997
  • 00:23:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The National Stolen Children: Truth and Reconciliation

June 2010 marked the first national hearing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, aimed at addressing the painful legacy of residential schools in Canada. First Nations, Métis and Inuit survivors began putting their stories on the official record as the Commission commenced its complex work. This collection of six documentaries from The National profiles Justice Murray Sinclair, Manitoba’s first Aboriginal judge and ...
  • 2010
  • 00:40:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013