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The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National A Canadian artist's efforts to capture stories of survival

A Saskatoon artist is using her portraits to examine two groups that suffered through oppression; in a way, bringing them face to face.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National As Nunavut struggles with food insecurity, students step up to help feed their peers

Food prices in Canada's north are so high that seven out of 10 young people there go hungry. A Nunavut high school is now trying to fight this food insecurity with a free hot lunch program run by the school's food studies class.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/13/2019

The National Indigenous graves have B.C. landowners pitted against the government

Thousands of sites in British Columbia are believed to be ancient First Nations burial grounds. Some are on private lands, and many Indigenous people believe these sites are sacred. But the government doesn't see the burial sites the same way as registered cemeteries, and that has left all parties frustrated and feeling vulnerable.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National How Tina Fontaine's death forced a community to take action

Tina Fontaine was a ward of Child and Family Services when she died five years ago — a tragedy that sparked community action to prevent the system from failing someone again.
  • 2019
  • 00:12:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/04/2019

The National Justin Trudeau makes historic apology for past governments’ mistreatment of Inuit with tuberculosis

Justin Trudeau has made a historic apology for past governments’ “colonial” and “purposeful” mistreatment of Inuit people with tuberculosis, which included taking them from their families.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Tina Fontaine report: “Not enough has changed” since teen’s death, says advocate

Tina Fontaine died in 2014. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since, not enough has changed to ensure other children don’t die.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Political cartoons: Where free speech runs up against poor taste

For the second time in two weeks, a political cartoonist is apologizing for his depiction of former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould in newspaper commentary on the SNC-Lavalin scandal. So, in an arena where free speech runs up against poor taste, is there a line? And if so, who defines it?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Ottawa unveils 'historic' Indigenous child welfare overhaul

While only seven per cent of Canada's children are Indigenous, they represent more than half of Canada's children in foster care. This is a startling statistic that a new Liberal bill, backed by First Nations leaders, aims to change.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Residential school survivor in search of apology from Pope Francis

As the Pope prepares for a historic summit on sexual abuse in the priesthood, a Canadian Indigenous woman is getting ready to take her painful story to the Vatican in search of an apology from the head of the Catholic Church.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:43
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

CBC News Bernie Francis reads "In Flanders Fields" in Mi'kmaq

For Remembrance Day, Mi'kmaw linguist Bernie Francis reads his translation of John McCrae's war poem "In Flanders Fields."
  • 2017
  • 00:01:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

News in Review - February 2019 Northern Power: Enlightening Communities

For most, electricity is something we take for granted. But more than 200 communities in the North don't have reliable power. That's because they're not hooked up to the power grid. Many of these communities are forced to run on costly diesel power, which is prone to frequent outages. Now a $1.6 billion government-backed project is going to bring power ...
  • 2019
  • 00:11:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2019

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News in Review - January 2019 Sir John A. Macdonald: A Legacy of Controversy

Sir John A. Macdonald has become a controversial figure in modern times. Of course, he was Canada’s first prime minister, responsible for bringing about Confederation and building a rail line across the country. But in this era of truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, his image has become a symbol of oppression to some. It was his policies that saw ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/30/2019

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The National Saskatchewan's apology for Sixties Scoop leaves survivors with mixed feelings

Starting in the 1950s, about 20,000 Indigenous children across Canada were seized from their birth families and relocated to non-Indigenous homes, where many were stripped of their language, culture and any ties to their families. For some, the apology was long overdue and welcomed. For others, the words rang hollow.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National New lens on life: using photography to heal from trauma

Suicide rates for Indigenous youth in Canada are up to seven times higher than for other young people. A remote community in northern Saskatchewan has been hit particularly hard in recent years, but now they're trying to change that, by discovering the healing power of photography.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Scathing report finds systemic racism in Thunder Bay's police force

In a scathing report, Ontario's independent police watchdog says systemic racism exists throughout the Thunder Bay Police Service. It goes on to state that the "inadequacy" of at least nine investigations into the deaths of Indigenous people over the past several years was "so problematic" that they should be reopened.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

CBC Docs POV Next of Kin

Nearly 50,000 Canadian children are in foster and group homes. Most will stop receiving support at age 19. Compared to their peers, youth aging out of care do not fare well. Too often they drop out of school, suffer PTSD and substance abuse, end up on welfare, in jail or homeless. In St. Catharines, Ontario an innovative non-profit believes connecting youth ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/26/2018

Studio K 3 Cool Facts About Teepees with Cottonball

Check out three cool facts about teepees from Cottonball's friend Sara at Fort Whyte Alive in Winnipeg.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:39
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/07/2018

The National Indigenous community divided over who tells their stories

The issue is in the spotlight thanks to three feature films at the Toronto International Film Festival with Indigenous content. However two of them are directed by non-Indigenous directors.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

Studio K Cottonball Learns How to Pow Wow

It's Cottonball's very first time at a Pow Wow. She visits the Manito Ahbee Pow Wow to learn everything there is to know from her new friends.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:18
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 11/05/2018

The House What would Canada look like without the Indian Act?

For the first time in a while, former prime minister Paul Martin, architect of the Kelowna Accord, says he's happy with where the federal government is steering its relationship with Canada's Indigenous peoples. During this week's cabinet shuffle, the federal government announced it would split Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) into two separate ministries with the goal of replacing ...
  • 2017
  • 00:18:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/11/2018

Up North Ontario's Metis vote to look into self government

This spring Metis became recognized under the Indian Act in Canada. Now the group representing Ontario's Metis is setting out to see how Metis people could become self-governing. We spoke to France Picotte, chair of the Metis Nation of Ontario.
  • 2016
  • 00:07:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/11/2018

The National Historic First Nations land claim ruling

The Supreme Court has granted title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of land in B.C. to the Tsilhqot'in First Nation.
  • 2014
  • 00:04:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

Power & Politics Government agrees to end sex-based status discrimination in Indian Act after Senate push

"They created this problem – not First Nations people, not Indigenous women," says Senator Murray Sinclair.
  • 2017
  • 00:08:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

CBC News How to talk about Indigenous people

Ever wonder how to use the proper terms when referring to Indigenous peoples? Inuk journalist Ossie Michelin leads us through this friendly how-to guide.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/12/2018