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The National Social media, Saudi Arabia and spyware

An activist from Saudi Arabia sought refuge in Canada after making critical comments on social media. Omar Abdulaziz thought he was safe until he received a text message that put spyware on his cellphone.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:25
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/06/2018

News in Review - October 2018 Safeguarding Social Media: Facebook's Challenge

Facebook has been the shooting star of social media platforms. Nothing could stop its meteoric rise as two billion users signed up to communicate and share online. But recent scandals from fake news to extremist content have plagued the firm and users are losing trust. If the firm cannot secure personal information and stop hackers, how can users feel safe? ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/16/2018

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The National Doctors want Canadians' medical records to be more accessible

Doctors want Canadians' medical records to be more accessible, via so-called patient portals. The online portal allows patients and authorized users to access their medical history — including blood tests, X-rays, scans and medications.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/12/2018

The National Brexit and U.S. political strategies creep into Canada

Brexit and U.S. political strategies are creeping into Canada via micro-targeting, which delivers tailored messages to specific people who are inclined to react.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/13/2018

The National An Internet free from corporate greed

NYCMesh is a group dedicated to establishing an Internet free from corporate dominance in New York, but can they realistically stand up to the big Internet service providers? Its members set up antennas on rooftops around the city to create a spider web of connections. CBC News got a look at how the underground network is building its own Internet.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Canadian tech used in repressive countries for censorship

Canadian company Netsweeper is under fire for its technology that can help repressive countries around the world censor the Internet for millions of users. The technology was born as a tool to help schools and libraries protect vulnerable users — now it's being sold and implemented at the network level in countries with dubious human rights records.
  • 2018
  • 00:11:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The National Revenge porn victimizes police officer

Revenge porn's latest victim is a young Canadian police officer who is coming forward after images she shared with another officer were made public. Brittany Roque believed the photos had been destroyed, but two years later they were sent to a potential employer. Roque has launched a civil suit that will test a new Manitoba law that helps victims of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/12/2018

The Weekly Zeynep Tufekci on Facebook's business model

Socio-technologist Zeynep Tufekci says Facebook’s business model is problematic. She tells the CBC’s Wendy Mesley that your data can be used to identify your politics and your personal weaknesses – even if you have never disclosed it.
  • 2018
  • 00:06:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018

CBC News Alert Ready to send emergency messages to smartphones

Alert Ready, the national emergency system that already sends alerts to television and radio, will soon be sending them to mobile phones too.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/16/2018

The National Canadians pay big fees for Internet — so why don't they switch companies?

Canadians pay some of the biggest fees for Internet service, and Canada's big telecommunication companies are raising their prices — so why don't Canadians switch to other companies? There are many alternatives to Bell, Rogers and Telus, but consumers seem reluctant to switch. CBC News takes a look at why Canadians continue to pay huge fees even as they complain ...
  • 2018
  • 00:05:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2018

The National What is a 5G network and how can it change your life?

5G cellular networks — the next step up from 4G — are being developed for testing in some cities but won't be fully functional until 2020. It's touted as being 100 times faster than 4G, but while 5G's benefits have the potential to change the way cities work, implementing it could prove to be quite costly.
  • 2018
  • 00:07:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/09/2018

The National Researching the spread of fake news and its impact

Researching the spread of fake news and its impact was the focus of a new report from MIT researchers on how rumours can spread faster and farther than the truth. Perhaps one of the more surprising findings is the suggestion that humans are a bigger issue in the spread of fake news than the bots that often get blamed.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/28/2018

The National Infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time

A small army of activists in Halifax is infiltrating North Korea, one USB drive at a time. It's all about getting tiny pieces of information into a country that tries to shelter its population from the outside world. Students at Dalhousie University are making videos of life in Halifax and putting them on the USB drives. They are they sent ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2018

The National Internet in South Korea a model for Canada

Internet access in South Korea is the fastest in the world and could be a model for Canada to follow. But a few obstacles stand in Canada's way — namely, a lack of competition that is keeping the Internet from improving.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2018

Marketplace Addicted to your phone?

Are you addicted to your smartphone? Companies are using science and artificial intelligence to keep you hooked, but tech insiders reveal to the Marketplace team how you can curb the urge to constantly stay connected. Plus they track a family's device usage over several months and reveal the staggering results — from the eight-year-old son, the teenage daughters to the parents. And ...
  • 2017
  • 00:22:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/15/2018

News in Review - January 2018 #MeToo: How a Hashtag Launched a Revolution

The #MeToo Campaign of 2017 could well be the most important movement of a generation. The hashtag took off in October and allowed victims of sexual harassment all over the world to unite on social media. It started with stunning revelations about film mogul Harvey Weinstein and grew into a global movement. The bravery of these women sharing their stories ...
  • 2018
  • 00:17:57
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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CBC Docs POV Indictment: The Crimes of Shelly Chartier

This is a riveting true story about a reclusive young woman from a small Manitoba First Nation who made international headlines. Shelly Chartier was portrayed by the media as a master manipulator who used social media to target an NBA superstar and an aspiring model. Through the sensitive and intelligent lens of Indigenous directors Lisa Jackson and Shane Belcourt, the ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/05/2017

The National Should public schools use crowdfunding?

Canadian public schools are using crowdfunding programs like myclassneeds to help secure the resources they need. But critics say the approach is a step towards privatization. Hear from voices on both sides of this issue.
  • 2017
  • 00:08:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2017

News in Review - October 2017 Social Influencers: Leveraging Popularity for Paydirt

In a world where those with the most followers means popularity and leverage, there’s a new celebrity in town. They’re called social influencers. They tweet, blog and video their brand picks all the way to the bank. And companies are willing to spend big bucks to get their endorsement if they can link their brand to new customers. But what ...
  • 2017
  • 00:14:18
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/18/2017

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Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery The Beaver's Tail

Where is one of the oldest expanses of rock in the world upon which you can actually eat a beaver tail? Jaxon and Song report the beaver tail eating crime to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in doing so, find the party at last!
  • 2017
  • 00:05:00
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 10/11/2017

Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery The Longest Tooth

What animal has the longest left front tooth in the world? In snowshoes, Jaxon and Song tiptoe past a polar bear in search of the animal with the longest left front tooth. Their search takes them to the Innuitians.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:01
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery Bergy Bits and Growlers

Where will you find bergy bits and growlers? Jaxon and Song narrowly miss a hoodoo as they hunt for the answer to this riddle. They end on the coast of Hudson’s Bay.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:00
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery The Breadbasket

What giant breadbasket has no bread in it? To solve this, Jaxon and Song go bronco riding at the Stampede and end up in the prairies.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:00
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery The Sunrise

You see sunrises every morning, but where do you have to stand to see the very first one in Canada? Hunting for the solution to this riddle takes Jaxon and Song on an iceberg slide.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:01
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

Jaxon and Song’s Maple Mystery The Raven

Where can they find a raven that soars, but never moves? The adventure takes Jaxon and Song over the Capilano Suspension Bridge and to the land of the Haida to find the answer.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:00
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/22/2017