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The National Fighting hate with friendship: The unlikely bond of a Sikh man and a former white supremacist

A Sikh man becomes the unlikely friend of a former white supremacist in the wake of a cold-blooded attack in Wisconsin in 2012. Now they travel the world trying to stop hate.
  • 2019
  • 00:11:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National How can governments help stop overwork?

The National has been exploring modern workplaces and why so many Canadians are battling burnout. But it's clearly not just a Canadian problem and depending on where you go around the world, the consequences and solutions can be quite extreme. So here's the question: How can governments help stop overwork?
  • 2019
  • 00:03:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Surveillance in synagogues: How security is becoming a focus in places of worship

We look at the way synagogues are changing as attacks on places of worship increase.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Indigenous graves have B.C. landowners pitted against the government

Thousands of sites in British Columbia are believed to be ancient First Nations burial grounds. Some are on private lands, and many Indigenous people believe these sites are sacred. But the government doesn't see the burial sites the same way as registered cemeteries, and that has left all parties frustrated and feeling vulnerable.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

News in Review - April 2019 Sam's Story: Sex Assault Survivor Speaks Out

At 17, Sam Fazio was just a regular teenager at a school dance in Vancouver. Then she was violently sexually attacked in a bathroom stall. Sam reported the crime and went through the grueling process of physical and mental recovery while having to deal with police and a court case that left her and others shaking their heads. Since then, ...
  • 2019
  • 00:16:42
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 04/09/2019

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The National How Tina Fontaine's death forced a community to take action

Tina Fontaine was a ward of Child and Family Services when she died five years ago — a tragedy that sparked community action to prevent the system from failing someone again.
  • 2019
  • 00:12:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/04/2019

The National 'Unprecedented' report released on racial profiling by Toronto police

A black person in Toronto is nearly 20 times more likely than a white person to be shot and killed by police, according to a new Ontario Human Rights Commission report on race and policing. The commission's interim report said black people were over-represented in several types of violent police interactions, including use-of-force cases, shootings, deadly encounters and fatal shootings.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Canada's mental health courts: How they work and why they exist

Canada has mental health courts that differ from normal courts, though much of the public is unaware they exist. CBC's senior investigative correspondent Diana Swain got a rare look inside proceedings at a Nova Scotia mental health court to find out how it operates and why they exist.
  • 2018
  • 00:09:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Tina Fontaine report: “Not enough has changed” since teen’s death, says advocate

Tina Fontaine died in 2014. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since, not enough has changed to ensure other children don’t die.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

CBC News The journey from refugee to police officer

Alain Arakaza arrived in Canada in 2009 as a refugee. Now he's about to become a Toronto police officer.
  • 2019
  • 00:01:50
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Huawei Arrest: Canada Caught in a Political Tug of War

The arrest of a top executive from Chinese company Huawei has placed Canada in the middle of a political tug of war. In December 2018, Canadian authorities detained Meng Wanzhou at the Vancouver airport at the request of U.S. law officials. Meng is the daughter of the founder of Huawei, the largest technical communications company in the world. She remains ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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The National Ottawa's fight with Netflix reignites age-old debate: what is Cancon and who should pay?

Canadian studios and production crews are busier than ever before, thanks in part to demand from foreign streaming giants such as Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. At the same time, those American behemoths are being accused of not contributing their fair share to produce Canadian content and culture. But what exactly constitutes Cancon?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Pregnancy, privacy and third-party marketing

A Toronto woman who signed up for a mailing list at a maternity store and later miscarried was shocked to receive a package of formula in the mail. She told CBC’s Go Public she was surprised about the extent to which her personal information was shared with third-party marketing companies.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National Can a law really stop fake news?

India, the world's biggest democracy, heads to the polls in just a few months. It's a country where fake news has actually killed people, something the government is looking to stop by making the dissemination of fake news against the law. But can a law actually stop fake news?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:52
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

The National The U.K. could ban social media sites in the wake of teen's death

The suicide of a young girl in the U.K. is prompting a heated debate about the responsibility of social media sites to remove harmful content. Her family says she had been viewing disturbing content about self harm on Instagram and Pinterest. Now the British government is considering banning certain platforms if companies don't comply.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:12
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

News in Review - February 2019 Bomb on Board: The Mystery of CP Flight 21

The mysterious crash of CP Flight 21 five decades ago remains one of the largest unsolved mass murders in Canadian history. The commercial flight took off from Vancouver, bound for Whitehorse on July 8, 1965, when it exploded in mid-air over the B.C interior. All 52 people on board were killed. Weather was ruled out as a factor. The investigation ...
  • 2019
  • 00:18:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/05/2019

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The National Ottawa unveils air passenger bill of rights

The federal government released draft rules aimed at forcing airlines to provide better customer service, including possible compensation for passengers who are bumped from flights due to overbooking.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Ontario judge says carding has little to no value as a policing tool

An Ontario judge who earlier this week called for the elimination of random street checks said carding only generates "low quality intelligence" and alienates certain communities from the police.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Tougher impaired driving laws raise concerns about targeting

Police officers in Canada who lawfully pull over a driver no longer need reasonable grounds to demand a sample of their breath. The new rules, however, are raising concerns about possible police targeting and there's a growing expectation that they will be challenged in court.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Scathing report finds systemic racism in Thunder Bay's police force

In a scathing report, Ontario's independent police watchdog says systemic racism exists throughout the Thunder Bay Police Service. It goes on to state that the "inadequacy" of at least nine investigations into the deaths of Indigenous people over the past several years was "so problematic" that they should be reopened.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National 'Battle' over as Trudeau, Trump, Pena Nieto sign 'new NAFTA'

The road to rewrite the North American trade agreement was a "battle," U.S. President Donald Trump said as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto joined him for a signing ceremony on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/07/2019

The National After the bullet: Helping gun violence victims suffering in silence

The shooting death of a 22-year-old in north Toronto marks the city's 89th homicide this year, matching a grim record that has stood unbroken for nearly three decades. The city is now being forced to confront some ugly truths about the root cause of gun violence. This includes how it deals with the hundreds of survivors it sees every year, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/07/2019

News in Review - December 2018 Under the Gun: Toronto's War Against Firearm Violence

In 2018 Canada’s largest city, Toronto, saw a massive increase in gun violence on its streets. Shootings were so frequent and often flagrant, taking place in broad daylight and near children’s playgrounds. The numbers were so high it had people worried that gun deaths in 2018 would surpass those of the so-called “Summer of the Gun” back in 2005. Police, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/21/2018

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News in Review - December 2018 Certain Death: A Mexican Journalist Fights Deportation

When Mexican journalist Emilio Gutiérrez Soto fled his home country with his son back in 2008 he thought his ordeal was over. Mexico is known to have one of the highest murder rates of reporters in the world – just behind war zones like Syria and Afghanistan. Journalists are killed there at a rate of about one per month, according ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/21/2018

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