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CBC News Smoking or vaping may increase risk of severe coronavirus infection

There's a growing body of research linking vaping, smoking cigarettes and cannabis to an increased risk of COVID-19 infection, serious illness and death rates.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:07
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2020

CBC News What we actually know about the coronavirus

Information about the coronavirus outbreak is spreading fast, but what do we actually know about the illness? CBC News medical contributor and family physician Dr. Peter Lin breaks down the facts about what it is, where it came from, how it spreads and what you can do to protect yourself.
  • 2020
  • 00:05:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/01/2020

The National Flattening the curve: How to slow down coronavirus spread

Graph shows how new cases of COVID-19 can quickly overwhelm a health-care system if precautions aren't taken.
  • 2020
  • 00:00:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/31/2020

CBC News Canadians cautioned not to believe hype around prevention or cures for coronavirus

Health Canada warns it's illegal to make false claims or sell unauthorized health products related to COVID-19.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC Kids News What is physical distancing?

We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social while still staying apart from each ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:35
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

The National Family doctor uses lessons learned during SARS during COVID-19 pandemic

Dr. Javed Alloo started practicing medicine during the SARS outbreak and is reminded he learned an important lesson from a patient who survived.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/30/2020

CBC Kids News What is flattening the curve?

Health officials keep talking about flattening the curve. Charlotte and Jimmy Greig, from Guelph, Ont., wanted to know what that means. Basically, it means people still get sick with the coronavirus, but over a longer period of time instead of all at once. That way, doctors are able to treat everyone who needs help, instead of having to deal with ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:22
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News What does it mean to be self-isolated?

What does it mean to be self-isolated? It’s all about reducing the spread of the coronavirus. Have you heard about people being self-isolated because of the coronavirus? It’s happening more and more, including to our prime minister and his wife. Watch the video to find out what it means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:07
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News What is social distancing?

Have you been told not to hug or touch your friends? That’s called social distancing. Why are we talking about this now? Some public health officials are encouraging social distancing as a way to keep the coronavirus from spreading. Check out this video for more on what that means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:23
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

CBC Kids News Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic?

Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic? It means it’s new and it’s spreading around the world. At first the coronavirus was called an outbreak. Then, on March 11, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced it was going to start calling it a pandemic. What’s a pandemic? A pandemic is a new virus that’s infecting a lot of people. It ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:06
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/19/2020

The Truth About... The Truth About HIV

HIV/AIDS has claimed 34 million lives worldwide. But now, even though stigma remains, a diagnosis is no longer a death sentence. This inspiring film looks at the science keeping HIV at bay and examines the moral panic that erupted when the virus first took hold. There are interviews from prominent figures including HIV awareness campaigner HRH Prince Harry, Sir Elton ...
  • 2017
  • 00:52:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/05/2020

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BBC Documentaries The Parkinson's Drug Trial: A Miracle Cure? (Part 2 of 2)

Filmed over six years, this program follows a group of volunteers with Parkinson’s as they take part in a groundbreaking medical trial testing an experimental drug called GDNF. Forty-two volunteers undergo complex brain surgery and months of drug infusions via a port embedded into the side of their skull. Can this clinical trial give hope to the estimated 10 million ...
  • 2019
  • 00:52:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/05/2020

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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BBC Documentaries The Parkinson's Drug Trial: A Miracle Cure? (Part 1 of 2)

Filmed over six years, this program follows a group of volunteers with Parkinson’s as they take part in a groundbreaking medical trial testing a drug called GDNF. Forty-two patients undergo complex brain surgery and months of infusions via a port embedded into the side of their skull. Can this clinical trial give hope to the estimated 10 million affected by ...
  • 2019
  • 00:51:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/05/2020

Due to rights limitations, BBC Channel content is not freely available.

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Canadian Museum of Nature Judith Price: Nature Talks about parasites

Join an intimate conversation with collections manager and biologist Judith Price as she discusses the weird and wonderful world of parasites, separating facts from theories and hopes. In English with French subtitles
  • 2014
  • 00:24:33
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/10/2020

Andrew Marr's History of the World Edward Jenner

In England, Edward Jenner used science to help save the lives of millions from smallpox.
  • 2012
  • 00:06:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/28/2020

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News in Review - November 2019 Vaping Alert: Are E-Cigarettes Really Safe?

E-cigarettes were designed to help smokers quit, but they’ve turned into a popular habit for many young people. Teens are enticed by the flavours, colours and allure of the product. But a growing number are falling ill with lung-related issues, and in the United States several have died. While no one product or ingredient has been linked to the illnesses, ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2019

Wave World Can a singer smash a glass using sound waves?

Jon Chase challenges young opera singers in Cardiff to smash glasses with their voices. After measuring the natural frequency of the glass, can the singers match it with enough power to smash it? The results are spectacular slowed down 300 times. Smashing things with sound waves isn’t just for fun. In medicine, sound waves can smash painful, hard growths inside ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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The Nature of Things Something in the Air

For a Canadian family living in Beijing, putting on face-masks to guard against smog is part of the morning routine. In China, air pollution causes more than 3,000 premature deaths every day. And cities across Asia and Europe — including London and Paris — now have to ban downtown traffic to manage their “Airpocalypse” days. But what about here at ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The National Nova Scotia's presumed consent for organ donation explained

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil tabled legislation that will make the province the first jurisdiction in North America to have presumed consent for organ and tissue donation. People will be able to opt out of donating their organs, but the onus will be on them to do so once the bill is proclaimed.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Robot-assisted surgery brings precision, problems

Robot-assisted surgery is revolutionizing the medical industry, with the first such procedure performed in Canada earlier this year, but there are still concerns around the risks and the costs.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/04/2019

The National B.C. measles outbreak has some kids taking their health into their own hands

Some 33 students and staff at the centre of a measles outbreak in Vancouver have been ordered to stay home because they haven't provided proof of vaccination. This has some B.C. kids taking their health into their own hands.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

The National ADHD drugs being over-prescribed to Quebec teens, doctors warn

Quebec doctors warn ADHD drugs are being over-prescribed to teens at twice the rate of any other province, leading to potentially harmful long-term effects.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2019

Enquête Breast implants: The trouble is under the skin

Thousands of Canadian women have had silicone breast implant surgery. Apart from some known complications, next-generation implants, approved by Health Canada in 2006, were said to be safe. Yet in recent years thousands of women have had their implants removed because of various problems. New studies have shown that silicone implants are linked to the development of autoimmune diseases and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:40:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/11/2019

The Nature of Things The Genetic Revolution

Trailblazing scientists are making ground-breaking discoveries in the rapidly evolving world of genetic engineering. Technologies like CRISPR are making it possible to quickly and cheaply change the DNA of all living things, including humans. Today, genes can be edited almost as easily as words on a computer screen. This new ability to alter our DNA holds the promise of curing ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2018

The Nature of Things The Memory Mirage

Memory is under heavy scrutiny by a new generation of scientists — and they’re posing an uncomfortable question: Can we trust what we remember about our lives? Just as we often recall someone’s name incorrectly, scientists say we can misremember critical personal events, catastrophes and even crimes we think we saw committed. Recent studies are questioning the fragile unreliability of ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018