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Wave World Can a singer smash a glass using sound waves?

Jon Chase challenges young opera singers in Cardiff to smash glasses with their voices. After measuring the natural frequency of the glass, can the singers match it with enough power to smash it? The results are spectacular slowed down 300 times. Smashing things with sound waves isn’t just for fun. In medicine, sound waves can smash painful, hard growths inside ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Wave World The GB surfing team demonstrate different types of waves

Jon Chase is on Croyde Beach in Devon, headquarters of the junior GB surfing team. His mission is to find out what different types of waves there are and how they work. With Britain's best young surfers, Jon investigates sea waves. How come the waves travel towards the shore but the sea water does not? Using demonstrations on the beach ...
  • 2015
  • 00:03:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Wave World What do a solar-powered car and a green plant have in common?

Jon Chase joins engineering students at Cambridge University hoping to win a race across Australia in their solar-powered car. Today they are testing the 110 km/h car on an airfield. They need as much power as possible, so the team uses solar cells normally used in space to power satellites. Jon discovers how the cells use light to make electricity. ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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The Code Fractal geometry in nature and digital animation

Marcus du Sautoy describes how fractal geometry can be used to describe natural objects, and how it is used in digital animation. Trees use the simple rule of trying to maximize surface area, and this is something that can be simulated mathematically to give a very realistic result. Mandelbrot explored this fractal property of infinite complexity in his work, which ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Hexagons in the natural world

Marcus du Sautoy visits a beekeeper and explores how bees create their honeycombs. If they are going to tessellate they have a limited number of regular polygons they could choose from, but the hexagon is the most efficient – giving the maximum storage area for the least amount of wax. In fact, the bees do not create hexagons, but circular ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:13
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Bitesize Space Science Gravity on Earth and in space

Jon Chase explains that the mass of an object is constant but its weight depends on the gravitational force. This force is higher on more massive planets and he would weigh more on Jupiter than on Earth. He uses a fairground ride to simulate the feeling of lower and higher gravitational forces. He explains that gravity is the force that ...
  • 2014
  • 00:04:53
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World Using light waves to make an image

Reece McCready is an award-winning young photographer who specializes in portraits. Presenter Jon Chase joins him and his subject, Lola, to see how they use light waves. As Reece uses his camera and lighting gear, Jon follows exactly what happens to the light waves on their journey from light, to Lola, to camera. Jon investigates the two sorts of reflection ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World What happens to sound waves when you record a song?

Jon Chase joins singer-songwriter Charlie-Anne Bradfield in the studio as she performs her song 'Butterfly'. As Charlie-Anne sings, Jon traces the path of the sound waves. He builds a large model to see how the sound waves travel through air. Jon's microphone made out of a plastic cup works just like the real one, turning sound into electrical waves. After ...
  • 2015
  • 00:05:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Wave World How light makes the colours we see

Jon Chase is at Leeds College of Art. The art students here know a thing or two about colour, so they’re taking part in an experiment. Can they work out what happens when light reflects off paints of different colours? One team of students paints the words RED, GREEN and BLUE, in each of the colours, red, green and blue. ...
  • 2015
  • 00:04:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Scientists and Scientific Method The work of Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov

This video introduces two Russian scientists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, working at Manchester University. They talk about the experiment they were carrying out when they accidentally discovered the process for extracting an amazing material called graphene in 2004. They talk about their scientific method and hypothesis, and how, by stripping away layers of graphite with strips of sticky tape, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:18
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Scientists and Scientific Method The work of Galileo Galilei

This video recreates a famous experiment in which Galileo, an Italian scientist, dropped two objects from the Leaning tower of Pisa in 1589. He explains that he did the experiment to show the pull of gravity on an object is the same, regardless of their different weights. He explains that force is a push or pull on an object. He ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:24
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Scientists and Scientific Method The work of Sir Isaac Newton

In this video, Sir Issac Newton explains how he discovered gravity when an apple fell from a tree and (as legend has it) hit him on the head. He outlines how he used scientific method and process to think about gravity, questioning why things fall straight down, not sideways or upwards. He talks about how he carried out his own ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:19
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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News in Review - February 2018 ​Tomorrow’s Energy: The Race for Fusion Power

The production of electricity remains an expensive and often dirty industry. Just think of fossil fuels or nuclear reactors. But nuclear fusion may hold the key to the world’s energy problems.  It’s clean and sustainable. The only thing is, nobody’s been able to create it yet. So, the race is on. Frédéric Zalac of CBC/Radio-Canada's Découverte looks at companies in California and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:21:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2018

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Engineering Connections Sydney Opera House

Richard Hammond climbs to the top of Sydney's iconic Opera House to unlock the engineering connections behind one of the most instantly recognizable buildings in the world. He reveals how an architect's sketch, rejected by the design competition jury, was transformed into concrete and glass through trailblazing building techniques inspired by a First World War gas mask, a set of ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:02
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/20/2016

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Engineering Connections Millau Sky Bridge

Richard Hammond reveals the engineering inspirations behind the tallest road bridge in the world: the Millau Viaduct in France. He fires three quarters of a million volts from his finger tips to see how the power of lightning cut the steel structure quickly and accurately. The huge piers – 340 metres high, and which would look down on the Eiffel ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/20/2016

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Engineering Connections Deep Space Observatory

Richard Hammond journeys to discover the startling Engineering Connections behind the Keck Observatory, which has seen further into the universe than any other telescope on Earth. He reveals that the Keck Observatory owes its incredible design to an ancient Greek ritual, an early 20th century Russian inventor, an American Civil War general, a breakthrough in aerial reconnaissance, and an attempt ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:31
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 04/20/2016

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World's Toughest Fixes Atom Smasher

A machine 17 miles around, worth seven billion dollars! The Large Hadron Collider is the largest atom-smasher ever built – a colossal instrument buried 300 feet underground, spanning two countries, designed to recreate conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. It could be our key to unlocking the secrets of the universe, except for one tiny thing: ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/10/2016

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Engineering Connections Airbus A380

Richard Hammond sets out on a quest to find the amazing Engineering Connections behind the Airbus A380, the largest passenger airliner in history. His journey reveals that this state-of-the-art aircraft owes as much to weapons of war, Mother Nature and household objects as it does to high technology. He discovers that a bicycle pump, a 19th century rocket, an ancient ...
  • 2007
  • 00:47:36
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/15/2016

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Engineering Connections Guggenheim Bilbao

Richard Hammond visits a building described as the ‘greatest of our time’ – the Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain – to find out which Engineering Connections made this iconic building possible. He finds out how a visionary architect transformed a decaying city into a vibrant tourist hub with his futuristic building. But it would not have been possible without a volcano, ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:00
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/13/2016

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Engineering Connections Wembley Stadium

Richard Hammond stands atop of the Wembley roof, in front of its record-breaking arch, to discover the Engineering Connections behind the new high tech home of English football. Richard reveals how the architects and engineers, under pressure to maintain Wembley's iconic status as a world-class sporting and music venue, drew inspiration from a rock climbing knot, the first glider to ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:02
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/13/2016

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Engineering Connections Ocean Airport

Richard Hammond reveals the startling Engineering Connections behind Hong Kong International Airport, one of the busiest and biggest in the world, sited on a specially constructed island. Then the world's largest construction project, it drew inspiration from a 13th century Arab irrigation machine to create new land, and a WWII bomber and car suspension to make the terminal building light, ...
  • 2009
  • 00:47:00
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/13/2016

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Engineering Connections Taipei Tower

Richard Hammond travels to Taipei and discovers the secrets of one of the world's tallest buildings, Taipei 101. This modern marvel of engineering stands at a jaw dropping 1,671 feet. Built right next to a seismic fault line and in a typhoon hotspot, its height is all the more impressive. Richard discovers just what it is in the Taipei 101's ...
  • 2008
  • 00:50:41
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/13/2016

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Engineering Connections Super Rig

Richard Hammond journeys to discover the startling Engineering Connections behind the Troll A gas platform – the largest object ever moved by man across the surface of the Earth. During his voyage he reveals that Troll A owes its incredible design to a 19th century French gardener, a 17th century German mayor, a Midwestern American architect, and the dawn of ...
  • 2007
  • 00:49:58
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 01/13/2016

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None of the Above Fire and Water

Sick of spending time at the car wash? Engineer and show host Tim Shaw thinks he can get the job done in just one second! In None of the Above, Tim conducts a series of "man-on-the-street" experiments that involve science, physics and engineering, and all of which will blow your mind or make you hold your breath. Tim hopes dropping ...
  • 2013
  • 00:22:01
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 12/22/2015

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None of the Above The Big Bangs

Tim shows how a glass droplet becomes a grenade and appears to magically transform zinc into gold.
  • 2014
  • 00:21:59
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 12/22/2015

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