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Voice of the Pioneer Black refugees in Ontario

Prof. Daniel Hill continues in the second of a 1979 four-part series of interviews on black history in Ontario with CBC Radio's Bill McNeil. Hill talks about the community volunteer groups that worked so hard to help black refugees arriving in Ontario on the Underground Railway in the mid-19th century, why Ontario was their main destination, the basis of the ...
  • 1979
  • 00:09:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

Breakaway Uncovering the history of slavery in Canada

Uncovering some hard truths about Canada's history of slavery. George Tombs is the translator of Canada's Forgotten Slaves: Two Hundred Years of Bondage, originally written by Marcel Trudel in 1960. It was one of the first history books to map out who used slaves, and painted a picture of who those slaves were. Tombs joins host Saroja Coelho to explain how ...
  • 2018
  • 00:13:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

London Morning Young and black in London

Oakridge Secondary School student Fazia Agbonhin and Western University student Elija Ngoy tell London Morning about their experiences growing up in London and what Black History Month means to them.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

The National Fighting hate with friendship: The unlikely bond of a Sikh man and a former white supremacist

A Sikh man becomes the unlikely friend of a former white supremacist in the wake of a cold-blooded attack in Wisconsin in 2012. Now they travel the world trying to stop hate.
  • 2019
  • 00:11:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National A Canadian artist's efforts to capture stories of survival

A Saskatoon artist is using her portraits to examine two groups that suffered through oppression; in a way, bringing them face to face.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National How Tina Fontaine's death forced a community to take action

Tina Fontaine was a ward of Child and Family Services when she died five years ago — a tragedy that sparked community action to prevent the system from failing someone again.
  • 2019
  • 00:12:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/04/2019

The National Trudeau delivers official apology for Canada's role in the MS St. Louis

The Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler tested the limits of Canada's humanity in the lead up to the Second World War and Canada's government failed that test "miserably," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said. Trudeau made an apology in the House of Commons for the 1939 decision by the Canadian government to turn away a boatload of German Jews seeking refuge ...
  • 2018
  • 00:06:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National 'Unprecedented' report released on racial profiling by Toronto police

A black person in Toronto is nearly 20 times more likely than a white person to be shot and killed by police, according to a new Ontario Human Rights Commission report on race and policing. The commission's interim report said black people were over-represented in several types of violent police interactions, including use-of-force cases, shootings, deadly encounters and fatal shootings.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/03/2019

The National Justin Trudeau makes historic apology for past governments’ mistreatment of Inuit with tuberculosis

Justin Trudeau has made a historic apology for past governments’ “colonial” and “purposeful” mistreatment of Inuit people with tuberculosis, which included taking them from their families.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Tina Fontaine report: “Not enough has changed” since teen’s death, says advocate

Tina Fontaine died in 2014. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since, not enough has changed to ensure other children don’t die.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Ottawa unveils 'historic' Indigenous child welfare overhaul

While only seven per cent of Canada's children are Indigenous, they represent more than half of Canada's children in foster care. This is a startling statistic that a new Liberal bill, backed by First Nations leaders, aims to change.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Residential school survivor in search of apology from Pope Francis

As the Pope prepares for a historic summit on sexual abuse in the priesthood, a Canadian Indigenous woman is getting ready to take her painful story to the Vatican in search of an apology from the head of the Catholic Church.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:43
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/25/2019

News in Review - March 2019 Fleeing Oppression: Saudi Teen Granted Asylum in Canada

Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun was just 18 years old when she barricaded herself in a Thai hotel room and started tweeting for help. The young Saudi woman claimed she was fleeing the oppression of her family and country and was seeking asylum. Her plight captured global attention on social media. Within days she was flying to Toronto after Canada agreed to ...
  • 2019
  • 00:18:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2019

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News in Review - January 2019 Maya/Mathangi/M.I.A. – The Making of a Political Pop Star

Mathangi Maya Arulpragasam – known simply as M.I.A. – is an acclaimed British rapper and pop star of Sri Lankan Tamil origin. Always controversial, she is an outspoken activist who uses her fame as a platform to express her political views, particularly about the Tamil crisis in Sri Lanka. Film director Stephen Loveridge put together a documentary of the artist’s ...
  • 2019
  • 00:09:05
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/31/2019

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News in Review - January 2019 Sir John A. Macdonald: A Legacy of Controversy

Sir John A. Macdonald has become a controversial figure in modern times. Of course, he was Canada’s first prime minister, responsible for bringing about Confederation and building a rail line across the country. But in this era of truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, his image has become a symbol of oppression to some. It was his policies that saw ...
  • 2019
  • 00:13:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/30/2019

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The National Ontario judge says carding has little to no value as a policing tool

An Ontario judge who earlier this week called for the elimination of random street checks said carding only generates "low quality intelligence" and alienates certain communities from the police.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Saskatchewan's apology for Sixties Scoop leaves survivors with mixed feelings

Starting in the 1950s, about 20,000 Indigenous children across Canada were seized from their birth families and relocated to non-Indigenous homes, where many were stripped of their language, culture and any ties to their families. For some, the apology was long overdue and welcomed. For others, the words rang hollow.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Tougher impaired driving laws raise concerns about targeting

Police officers in Canada who lawfully pull over a driver no longer need reasonable grounds to demand a sample of their breath. The new rules, however, are raising concerns about possible police targeting and there's a growing expectation that they will be challenged in court.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Scathing report finds systemic racism in Thunder Bay's police force

In a scathing report, Ontario's independent police watchdog says systemic racism exists throughout the Thunder Bay Police Service. It goes on to state that the "inadequacy" of at least nine investigations into the deaths of Indigenous people over the past several years was "so problematic" that they should be reopened.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

News in Review - December 2018 Certain Death: A Mexican Journalist Fights Deportation

When Mexican journalist Emilio Gutiérrez Soto fled his home country with his son back in 2008 he thought his ordeal was over. Mexico is known to have one of the highest murder rates of reporters in the world – just behind war zones like Syria and Afghanistan. Journalists are killed there at a rate of about one per month, according ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/21/2018

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News in Review - November 2018 Carl Lutz: The Swiss Schindler

During the Second World War, Oskar Schindler, a German industrialist and Nazi officer, was credited with saving 1,200 Jews. His story was told by director Steven Spielberg in the award-winning movie Schindler's List. Yet to this day, few know the name of Carl Lutz. Tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews owe their lives to this modest Swiss diplomat, among them two ...
  • 2018
  • 00:10:26
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/29/2018

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CBC Docs POV Shut Him Down: The Rise of Jordan Peterson

In less than one year University of Toronto Professor Jordan Peterson has gone from near anonymity to being lauded as the most important public intellectual in the Western world. How did this happen? Shut Him Down provides an intimate behind-the-scenes glimpse of Peterson's meteoric and controversial rise to fame as the film unravels his stand against preferred (trans)gender pronouns and political correctness, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018

The Passionate Eye Documenting Hate

Reporter A.C. Thompson shines an unflinching light on the rise of America’s new white supremacist groups and how they recruit. The result of a year-long investigation, the documentary shows how some of those behind the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, went unpunished and continued to operate. Documenting Hate is an eye-opening examination of how white supremacist ideologies have moved out ...
  • 2018
  • 00:46:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/22/2018

CBC Docs POV The Reckoning: Hollywood's Worst Kept Secret

Powerful, personal and uncensored, The Reckoning explores the most explosive scandal in pop culture’s history: sexual harassment in Hollywood. The film features devastating accounts from a diverse cast and points a spotlight on the irrefutable facts that propelled these seemingly invincible players to be protected and their secrets hidden at all costs. It explores what can be done and if anything can ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/20/2018