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CBC | Radio-Canada Documentary The Style is the Man Himself (Part 2 of 2)

A look at the Liberal leadership campaign in which Pierre Trudeau defeated candidates Lorne Henderson, Eric Kierans, Paul Hellyer, Robert Winters, Mitchell Sharp, Allan MacEachen, Paul Martin, John Turner and Joe Greene. Includes footage of their candidacy announcements, campaigning, convention speeches and between-ballot wheeling and dealing. Part 2 of 2.
  • 1968
  • 00:30:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2021

CBC | Radio-Canada Documentary The Style is the Man Himself (Part 1 of 2)

A look at the Liberal leadership campaign in which Pierre Trudeau defeated candidates Lorne Henderson, Eric Kierans, Paul Hellyer, Robert Winters, Mitchell Sharp, Allan MacEachen, Paul Martin, John Turner and Joe Greene. Includes footage of their candidacy announcements, campaigning, convention speeches and between-ballot wheeling and dealing. Part 1 of 2.
  • 1968
  • 01:00:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Obey

The word OBEY does not exist in Indigenous languages. Our ancestors lived by their own systems of governance that sought to maintain harmony among all living things. The concept of obedience was forced upon us by church and government authorities. It slowly took hold and changed both our way of life and our way of governing ourselves. The time has ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Bannock

Flour, baking powder, a pinch of salt and a bit of water. Beloved and delicious, this traditional fry bread is a staple in Indigenous kitchens, but its colonial roots come with serious health repercussions. This episode is a mouth-watering journey decolonizing the word BANNOCK.
  • 2021
  • 00:19:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Pocahontas

How do you dismantle the colonial myth of POCAHONTAS? Disney's portrait of the Indian Princess has been indelibly pressed into young minds: she is naïve and noble, sexualized, innocent, and in need of a white saviour to win her heart. In reality, Indigenous women have always played strong and valued roles in their communities, leading by will and courage. Western ...
  • 2021
  • 00:19:16
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Savage

How did we go from 'noble savages' to 'dirty savages'? Over time, the meaning of the word has shifted from natural, free and pure to a derogatory word used to diminish us and cast us aside. Indigenous people were considered "uncivilized", synonymous with barbaric, bestial and cruel. This word has inflicted deep wounds and fuels prejudices to this day. Together, ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Indian Time

Running late? The importance of being on time is cultural, as are differences in priorities and perspectives. Together, we will decolonize INDIAN TIME and examine how Indigenous perceptions of time persist, even while 'running late'.
  • 2021
  • 00:16:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/28/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Family Names

Where do the surnames O'Bomsawin, Mukash and Ikey come from? In our culture, names are powerful gifts given to us by our ancestors, highlighting a character trait that shows up at birth, or designating a life mission for each of us to embrace. But ever since settlers arrived on our shores, our names have been distorted, or flat-out fabricated. Together, ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories School

For over 150 years, Indian Residential Schools were one of the primary means by which the government assimilated us in order to “kill the Indian in the child.” These compulsory schools shattered our families, our languages and our cultures. This great pain was passed down from generation to generation and impacts our communities to this day. Together, we will decolonize ...
  • 2021
  • 00:23:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Reserve

We lived in balance with nature for thousands of years, inhabiting this land without borders or titles. We were relocated to tiny parcels of land, owned by the Crown, in order for colonial authorities to gain unhindered access to our lands. Today, we still dream about the vastness of our lands and waters. In this episode we'll decolonize the word ...
  • 2021
  • 00:24:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Telling Our Twisted Histories Discovery

70 conversations. 15 Indigenous communities. 11 words with the power to hurt. In this first episode, host Kaniehti:io Horn decolonizes the word, 'discovery'. Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, even Leif Erikson all claimed to have found a 'new' land. But by the time they reached the shores of the Americas, millions of people had already been living here for at least ...
  • 2021
  • 00:22:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

CBC Docs POV #Blessed

C3 is an Evangelical church that opened in Toronto in 2013 and quickly amassed a large following among the city’s young, hip and tattooed. #Blessed offers an intimate look inside this fast-growing millennial church, following the process of selling salvation in the 21st century. Much like other viral church startups of the 21st century, C3 is tapping into something very ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 07/27/2021

Kiwew The future (Part 5 of 5)

David looks to the future and imagines how he will continue to connect with his Cree identity without his father by his side.
  • 2020
  • 00:20:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2021

Kiwew Cree awakening (Part 4 of 5)

David always felt he was different growing up, but it wasn’t until he was being teased one summer in the small town of Melita that he thought to question it. In this episode we hear how David, with the help of his father, begins to embrace his Cree identity.
  • 2020
  • 00:17:22
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2021

Kiwew Born on the land (Part 3 of 5)

David's earliest childhood memory involves running down the hallway of his suburban Winnipeg home, whereas his father's takes place on the trapline, in Northern Manitoba. Despite these disparate beginnings, both have had to embark on their own journeys to reconnect with their Cree identities.
  • 2020
  • 00:18:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2021

Kiwew A family mystery (Part 2 of 5)

David discovers a missing branch from his family tree – a great-aunt no one quite remembers, whose short life came to a tragic end. David pieces together the clues and makes some surprising discoveries.
  • 2020
  • 00:17:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2021

Kiwew Effie (Part 1 of 5)

Host David Robertson explores the mysterious death of his great-aunt Effie and discovers that record-keeping, especially when it involves the lives and deaths of Indigenous people, is patchy, at best.
  • 2020
  • 00:19:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/16/2021

About Here What's transportation going to look like after the pandemic? Classroom Favourites

In this episode, Uytae Lee explores transportation networks - and how they’ll recover after the pandemic. Are we headed for more traffic congestion than ever before? Is public transit doomed? Should we pursue alternative methods such as cycling and walking? Uytae walks you through the important questions.
  • 2021
  • 00:08:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/15/2021

About Here Explore the demise of the nightclub and how nightlife could be revived post pandemic

It's pretty hard to physically distance yourself at a club, so it should come as no shock that the COVID-19 pandemic left the nightlife industry struggling, with many nightclubs at risk of closing down permanently. But statistics show nightlife venues were already on the decline before anyone had heard of the coronavirus. In this video, CBC columnist Uytae Lee explores ...
  • 2020
  • 00:09:23
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/14/2021

About Here Vancouver's Street Food

For a city that’s as culturally rich and diverse as Vancouver, its street food scene feels a bit sparse. The reason behind that? Uytae Lee says a plethora of restrictive regulations created by a lot of behind-the-scenes drama.
  • 2019
  • 00:05:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/14/2021

About Here Explore the history and future of the handshake

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have stopped shaking hands and opted for other greetings like the elbow bump or foot tap. In this video, CBC columnist Uytae Lee asks why we ever shook hands – a social norm now turned faux-pas – in the first place.
  • 2020
  • 00:07:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/14/2021

Party Lines A residential schools reckoning, again

Elamin and Rosie explore the state of Canada’s path to reconciliation with the help of CBC colleague Duncan McCue. Many people across the country have reacted with shock and horror at the preliminary discovery on the grounds of a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C., where the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said they found the potential remains of possibly ...
  • 2021
  • 00:27:51
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 07/13/2021

CBC Radio One Central Kootenay school ditches name of a royal family member for reconciliation with Lower Kootenay Band

The former Prince Charles Secondary School in Creston, B.C. held a ceremony to remove the royal family member's name from its exterior signage — just three days after the Kootenay Lake School District voted unanimously to order the deletion. Ki Louie, a teacher at the former Prince Charles Secondary School, and his uncle Robert Louie, the first Indigenous graduate from ...
  • 2021
  • 00:09:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/24/2021

News in Review - April 2021 Black on Campus: Allegations of Discrimination in Canadian Universities

Is systemic racism prevalent in Canadian universities and colleges? Some students and faculty say they’ve experienced anti-Black racism and systemic discrimination on campuses. And when they try to speak up about it, they say they are targeted. In this CBC Fifth Estate investigation, Asha Tomlinson speaks to students, staff and faculty about what it’s like to be Black on campus.
  • 2021
  • 00:21:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/11/2021

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News in Review - March 2020 Chernobyl: Disaster Tourism Revives the Past

In April 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine exploded, sending a plume of radioactive dust into the air. The explosion at reactor four was played down at first but quickly became the closest mankind has come to a complete nuclear meltdown. Thirty one people died in the immediate aftermath and thousands more would die over the years from radiation-related ...
  • 2020
  • 00:13:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/26/2021

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