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The Nature of Things The Power of Play

From youngsters fooling around to adults having a laugh, playing is a fact of human life. But new findings in animal behaviour show us that play is no laughing matter — in fact, it's key to survival. And it’s not just people and pets that play, but reptiles, amphibians and insects, too.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2019

The Nature of Things Laughing and Crying

“Ha ha,” “hee hee,” “boo hoo,” “waaa, waaa”... the unmistakable sounds of laughing and crying are recognizable all over the world. They’re pillars of human communication, yet some researchers say that when it comes to studying human behaviour, there’s nothing as poorly understood as laughs and tears. Why did we develop these unusual vocal communication techniques? How uniquely human are ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/13/2019

The National Sports Illustrated's burkini cover: exploitation or representation?

The 2019 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition features supermodel Halima Aden wearing a burkini on the cover. The National's Pop Panel breaks down the complex values at play.
  • 2019
  • 00:11:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

CBC News #MeToo movement: Thousands of women identify as victims of assault, harassment

A call to action led by actress Alyssa Milano has thousands of women identifying themselves as victims of sexual harassment or assault. The movement is happening in the wake of accusations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.
  • 2017
  • 00:10:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National The dirty business of sorting your recycling bin

Recycling is a ritual in a lot of Canadian homes, and we do it with the best intentions. But intentions in our kitchens may not be good enough.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:20
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National Trudeau exonerates wrongfully convicted Chief Poundmaker

In the hills of west-central Saskatchewan, on the reserve that bears the name of a revered and wrongly convicted First Nations leader, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau set right a historic wrong: exonerating the Cree Chief Poundmaker and recognizing his true legacy.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National UCP's gay-straight alliance plan sees Alberta students walk out in protest

The United Conservative Party’s plan to change a law prohibiting Alberta schools from telling parents their child is part of a gay-straight alliance drew angry protests from thousands of students.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National The legacy of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike

Winnipeg is marking one of the seminal strikes in Canadian history. One hundred years ago, tens of thousands of workers walked off the job in what would come to be known as the Winnipeg General Strike.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:51
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National Indian day school survivors await settlement

It’s taken a decade to hammer out a compensation package for survivors of Indian day schools, but this week a federal court in Winnipeg is holding hearings on a tentative settlement worth $1.4 billion.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National What you need to know if you e-transfer money

E-transfers are sent over a million times a day in Canada. Despite the popularity, an RBC customer says the money transferring system is not as safe as it advertises. She had $1,734 stolen during an e-transfer after a fraudster intercepted a transaction.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

CBC News Quebec's Bill 101 is official

At the end of a long hot summer, Bill 101, the French language charter, is adopted on August 26, 1977, kicking off the transformation from a traditionally bilingual Quebec into a unilingual French province. Bill 101 is shock therapy for what the PQ describe as a sick society that Quebec has become, reports CBC's David Bazay. The new French language ...
  • 1977
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

CBC News Who are the Métis?

Who is and who isn't “Métis” is a controversial topic. We hear different perspectives from the leader of the Manitoba Métis Federation and the self-described Grand Chief of an Eastern Métis organization from Nova Scotia.
  • 2019
  • 00:05:49
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

CBC Radio One PM Pierre Trudeau sends telegram to Canadians after Summit Series

After Canada's victorious hockey game against the Soviets, Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau drafts a congratulatory telegram for Team Canada in Moscow. He says the win is especially remarkable because the players were able to pull up from behind. For the past couple of hours, all regular activity was put on hold as Canada watched game 8 on television sets ...
  • 1972
  • 00:01:28
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

Day 6 "He doesn’t need the NFL": How Colin Kaepernick controls his narrative

Colin Kaepernick may still be without a job, but the football quarterback is making his presence known. During the 2018 NFL season opener, Kaepernick was featured in a Nike ad. Two years ago, Kaepernick became famous – and infamous – for taking a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial inequality and police violence. The former San Francisco ...
  • 2018
  • 00:07:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

Voice of the Pioneer Black refugees in Ontario

Prof. Daniel Hill continues in the second of a 1979 four-part series of interviews on black history in Ontario with CBC Radio's Bill McNeil. Hill talks about the community volunteer groups that worked so hard to help black refugees arriving in Ontario on the Underground Railway in the mid-19th century, why Ontario was their main destination, the basis of the ...
  • 1979
  • 00:09:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

Breakaway Uncovering the history of slavery in Canada

Uncovering some hard truths about Canada's history of slavery. George Tombs is the translator of Canada's Forgotten Slaves: Two Hundred Years of Bondage, originally written by Marcel Trudel in 1960. It was one of the first history books to map out who used slaves, and painted a picture of who those slaves were. Tombs joins host Saroja Coelho to explain how ...
  • 2018
  • 00:13:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

London Morning Young and black in London

Oakridge Secondary School student Fazia Agbonhin and Western University student Elija Ngoy tell London Morning about their experiences growing up in London and what Black History Month means to them.
  • 2019
  • 00:09:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/03/2019

RDI économie La tarification du carbone en déroute?

L’Alberta laisse tomber la taxe carbone. Est-ce que le marché du carbone est en train de s’étioler? Analyse avec Annie Chaloux, professeure à l’Université de Sherbrooke. Épisode du 22 mai 2019.
  • 2019
  • 00:08:39
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 05/30/2019

The National Fighting hate with friendship: The unlikely bond of a Sikh man and a former white supremacist

A Sikh man becomes the unlikely friend of a former white supremacist in the wake of a cold-blooded attack in Wisconsin in 2012. Now they travel the world trying to stop hate.
  • 2019
  • 00:11:24
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National The lesson Canada's historic building can learn from the Notre-Dame fire

Some of Canada's oldest buildings are places of worship, much like Notre-Dame Cathedral. Montreal alone has 450 churches that date back to the 1800s or earlier. That history is far less cared for, and far more vulnerable than you might think.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/29/2019

The National How can governments help stop overwork?

The National has been exploring modern workplaces and why so many Canadians are battling burnout. But it's clearly not just a Canadian problem and depending on where you go around the world, the consequences and solutions can be quite extreme. So here's the question: How can governments help stop overwork?
  • 2019
  • 00:03:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National A Canadian artist's efforts to capture stories of survival

A Saskatoon artist is using her portraits to examine two groups that suffered through oppression; in a way, bringing them face to face.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National Surveillance in synagogues: How security is becoming a focus in places of worship

We look at the way synagogues are changing as attacks on places of worship increase.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

Absolutely Canadian The End of the Road

Follow this real life group of American war resisters and free-spirited Canadians and Europeans, escaping conformity and comfort for greener pastures. Not only did this eclectic group of dreamers, artists and intellectuals find Lund, Canada, they accidentally found each other. Overeducated, underemployed and ill-equipped, this adventurous crew finds love, shares lovers and experiments with everything. Not always a utopia, the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:44:35
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/27/2019