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The National Refugees come to Canada to escape gender persecution

Canada, as everyone knows, has long been a favourite destination for refugees seeking the safety and stability this country provides. Traditionally most were fleeing political or religious persecution, but a CBC News investigation got access to the data from nearly five years of Refugee Board decisions, giving a striking look at who else is coming here and why. Of the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/23/2018

The National Women and minimum wage

One hundred years after Canada introduced a minimum wage, it's mostly women still stuck at the bottom of the income ladder. And while some call recent minimum wage hikes a good thing, others call them job killers.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/23/2018

The National Olympic twins pioneered Canadian women's skiing

The athletes who will compete in Pyeongchang know all about perseverance and grit, but they may be no match for Rhoda and Rhona Wurtele. The 96-year-old twins started skiing at age 5 and basically never stopped, blazing a trail when women were a rarity in downhill skiing, all the way to the Olympics. Their passion is inspiring a brand-new generation ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:04
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 02/23/2018

The National Caroline Mulroney the latest Canadian politician to continue family legacy

Caroline Mulroney is the latest Canadian politician to try and continue their family's political legacy. Mulroney, the daughter of former prime minister Brian Mulroney, announced her candidacy for the Ontario Progressive Conservative party leadership – meaning all three candidates in the race so far come from well known political families.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/23/2018

The National Fewer secrets in Canadian government thanks to leaky walls

Party politics is full of secrets that often get leaked for a specific purpose, to get reaction to a new idea or perhaps to embarrass an opponent. But on Parliament Hill some leaks are accidental. There are renovations happening right now aiming to solve the problem of poor soundproofing on the Hill. But in the meantime, MPs have had to ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2018

News in Review - February 2018 ​Halifax Explosion: 100 Years On​

It’s considered one of the deadliest disasters in Canadian history. On December 6, 1917, two vessels collided in Halifax Harbour. One was carrying explosives. The ensuing explosion ripped through the city, literally flattening the north end. Two thousand people were killed and another 9,000 were injured or maimed. It's an accident that scarred the city and its residents for decades. ...
  • 2018
  • 00:14:08
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 02/22/2018

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News in Review - February 2018 Raqqa in Ruins: Former ISIS Capital Reclaimed

Raqqa was once a thriving city in Syria; until 2014, when the jihadist group ISIS declared it as its self-proclaimed capital. In 2017, the battle for Raqqa began with Russian and Syrian bombers providing air strikes and the U.S. led Syrian Democratic Forces on the ground. The battle took many months, but eventually ISIS was driven out. The city is ...
  • 2018
  • 00:18:36
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/22/2018

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News in Review - February 2018 Sexual Slavery: The Shocking World of Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is big business in Canada, with girls, some as young as 12, coerced into sexual slavery. Ninety percent of the victims come from within Canada. They are controlled by pimps who may initially pose as their boyfriends, showering them with attention and gifts. Then they are threatened, beaten, held captive and even branded. The problem has become so ...
  • 2018
  • 00:19:39
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/22/2018

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CBC News Manitoba Students use math to make street crossing safer

Grade 11 students in Winnipeg took their lessons into the real world with a project to help classmates cross a busy street. In the last five years there have been over 100 collisions involving pedestrians at two crosswalks near their school. Can their math skills solve this problem?
  • 2017
  • 00:01:52
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 02/15/2018

Marketplace Addicted to your phone?

Are you addicted to your smartphone? Companies are using science and artificial intelligence to keep you hooked, but tech insiders reveal to the Marketplace team how you can curb the urge to constantly stay connected. Plus they track a family's device usage over several months and reveal the staggering results — from the eight-year-old son, the teenage daughters to the parents. And ...
  • 2017
  • 00:22:36
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/15/2018

CBC Short Docs Freedom Summer

At this summer camp in Toronto, Black youth learn about self-love and Black liberation. Moon is a 13-year-old discovering what it means to take responsibility as a leader. Rihanna is a seven-year-old learning to love the skin she’s in. Freedom Summer follows them as they learn about themselves and others at Black Lives Matter Toronto’s Freedom School — a summer camp where ...
  • 2018
  • 00:11:50
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 02/12/2018

The National Children with ADHD move twice as much when learning, tests show

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may fidget and move around because it helps them learn complex material, research suggests.
  • 2017
  • 00:01:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/12/2018

News in Review - January 2018 After Maria: Puerto Rico Struggles to Rebuild

The summer of 2017 was devastating for the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. The island was already struggling from an economic crisis when two back to back hurricanes hit. The second, Maria, battered the island, tearing out its already fragile infrastructure – including electricity and water. Two months later, recovery is slow and island residents feel forgotten.
  • 2018
  • 00:18:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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News in Review - January 2018 #MeToo: How a Hashtag Launched a Revolution

The #MeToo Campaign of 2017 could well be the most important movement of a generation. The hashtag took off in October and allowed victims of sexual harassment all over the world to unite on social media. It started with stunning revelations about film mogul Harvey Weinstein and grew into a global movement. The bravery of these women sharing their stories ...
  • 2018
  • 00:17:57
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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News in Review - January 2018 North Korea: A Growing Threat to World Peace​

North Korea is an isolated and secretive country. Its leader, Kim Jong-un, took power in 2011 after the death of his father, Kim Jong-il. Since then, he has doggedly pursued the development of a nuclear bomb. The United States has long been considered the deterrent to other nations developing nuclear weapons. But that hasn’t stopped Kim. In 2017, North Korea ...
  • 2018
  • 00:19:06
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/26/2018

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Small Talk Friendship

This Small Talk episode looks at the power of relationships and what makes someone a friend.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:29
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 01/24/2018

The Stats of Life Food

In this episode we meet the statistically average family that can’t seem to make time to eat healthy meals together. Plus, a large family that has 25 people over for dinner every Friday and a couple from the east coast who have so little money that to feed themselves they forage for food, tend a garden and barter for meals ...
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

The Stats of Life Home

In this episode we meet the family with the statistically average home who are looking for ways to increase its value. Plus, a family who bought a huge home now regrets the constant upkeep, and a pair of sisters are looking to buy their first home — right in the middle of a frantic real estate bubble.
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

The Stats of Life Money

In this episode we meet a couple who find that earning the statistically average income still makes it difficult to raise a family. Plus, a woman worth $100 million moves her family into her dream home and a couple making a decent income are so loaded down with debt that they’re considering bankruptcy.
  • 2017
  • 00:23:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/17/2018

CBC Docs POV The Caregivers’ Club

Relatives of dementia victims call themselves members of "the club no one wants to join." The Caregivers' Club follows three families on a devastating but ultimately inspiring journey thousands of families will be forced to take as Canada ages. Their stories go far beyond the practical problems of navigating the healthcare system, and into the psychological challenges of coping with the deterioration ...
  • 2018
  • 00:44:13
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/16/2018

CBC Arts Keep Calm and Decolonize: Walking is Medicine

In response to Buffy Sainte-Marie's call to "Keep Calm and Decolonize," legendary director Alanis Obomsawin follows the Nishiyuu walkers. These six young people and their adult guide made the trek from their James Bay Cree community of Whapmagoostui in Quebec all the way to Ottawa — a 1,600-kilometre journey whose roots date back millennia. At the heart of Obomsawin's film is the ...
  • 2017
  • 00:05:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/16/2018

CBC News Vancouver Vancouver 125: Origins of Chinatown and DTES

In this report created to celebrate Vancouver's 125th anniversary, CBC's Tim Weekes looks at the tumultuous past of Vancouver's storied Chinatown and Downtown Eastside (DTES) neighbourhoods.
  • 2011
  • 00:03:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/16/2018

CBC Short Docs Declutter

Reflecting on the long-term impact the residential school experience has had on her family, filmmaker Madison Thomas begins to understand why her mother is always cleaning. This short film gives insight into not only intergenerational trauma, but also intergenerational strength.
  • 2017
  • 00:04:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/16/2018

CBC Animation The Great Northern Candy Drop

This poignant animation tells the true story of Inuk bush pilot Johnny May, who has flown over Kuujjuaq in the Nunavik region of Northern Quebec to drop candy, toys and warm clothing to the children and residents of the community each holiday season for more than 50 years. Featuring the voices of Tantoo Cardinal and Lorne Cardinal, the film is ...
  • 2017
  • 00:21:58
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 12/20/2017

News in Review - December 2017 Crisis on Campus: Mental Health Demands Surge

There’s an increasing demand for mental health services on college and university campuses across Canada. That’s because the latest statistics show that one in five post-secondary students suffers from some kind of mental health issue. It can range from feeling overwhelmed to depression and suicidal thoughts. The number of students seeking counselling is multiplying so fast, colleges and universities are ...
  • 2017
  • 00:12:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/20/2017

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