Ivy's Plant Shop How does water get from the roots to the leaves of a plant? New

This video explores how water is transported from the roots, through the tubes in the stem, to the tip of the plant. The process is demonstrated with an experiment. White carnations are placed in water with different colour dyes in them. Eventually the petals adopt the colour of the dyes, thus highlighting the process.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:42
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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Ivy's Plant Shop Classifying and grouping plants New

An entertaining overview of how plants can easily be arranged according to their common features and characteristics. For example: plants with seeds (e.g. flowering plants and conifers) or without seeds (e.g. ferns and mosses). Teacher notes: You could bring in different variations of plants and get students to catogorize them using the information highlighted in the video. They could then ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:04
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/04/2019

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The Code Fractal geometry in nature and digital animation New

Marcus du Sautoy describes how fractal geometry can be used to describe natural objects, and how it is used in digital animation. Trees use the simple rule of trying to maximize surface area, and this is something that can be simulated mathematically to give a very realistic result. Mandelbrot explored this fractal property of infinite complexity in his work, which ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Using probability functions to help locate serial killers New

Marcus du Sautoy meets a detective with a PhD in mathematics who has created a probability function that can help narrow down the area in which a serial killer is likely to live. The case of Jack the Ripper is outlined, and the probable street where he lives revealed. The function is then broken down and the different elements explained: ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:33
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Normal distribution in fish populations New

Marcus du Sautoy examines a sample of dover sole from a day's catch, and by measuring the weight of this small number of fish, explores how the bell-curve of the Normal Distribution allows us to predict what the largest fish in the population is likely to weigh, even without catching it. The calculations are not shown in full detail, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:09
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Imaginary numbers at use in the real world New

Starting with the logical roots of arithmetic with negative numbers, Marcus du Sautoy explains how mathematicians created imaginary numbers by ‘imagining’ the square root of -1. Though imaginary in nature, he then explores how this abstract mathematical idea has become vital to air traffic control systems. Teacher notes: Use as an enrichment and extension clip during a series of lessons ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:33
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Using patterns in Google searches to predict flu outbreaks New

Marcus du Sautoy explores how internet searches are building up a huge database of linked information which can then be mined for patterns. Visiting Google’s offices, he sees this at work and reveals just how closely Google can predict flu outbreaks, even before hospitals have begun to need to respond to them. Flu kills hundreds of thousands each year, but ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:02
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Hexagons in the natural world New

Marcus du Sautoy visits a beekeeper and explores how bees create their honeycombs. If they are going to tessellate they have a limited number of regular polygons they could choose from, but the hexagon is the most efficient – giving the maximum storage area for the least amount of wax. In fact, the bees do not create hexagons, but circular ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:13
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Andrew Marr's History of the World The Atomic bomb New

Andrew Marr explores the development and deployment of the first atomic bomb. He describes the moral dilemma faced by the scientists of the Manhattan Project, and the fallout from the detonation of the bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Warning: Contains some upsetting and disturbing scenes. Teacher notes: Students could write a series of haiku poems (5-7-5 syllables) justifying ...
  • 2012
  • 00:08:49
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Andrew Marr's History of the World Hitler's rise to power New

Andrew Marr tells the story of Hitler’s rise to power in Weimar Germany from 1919 to 1933. He explores Hitler’s years in the wilderness after the First World War, the Munich Putsch and the reason for his electoral success in 1933. Teacher notes: Pupils could use the video to write a news report or fact file about Hitler’s background. They ...
  • 2012
  • 00:08:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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