The Nature of Things Myth or Science: The Power of Poo

Dr. Jennifer Gardy lifts the lid on poop to discover if it’s myth or science that we’re flushing a valuable resource down the toilet. Every year, worldwide, we produce nine billion kilograms of the stuff — six metric tons each over our lifetime. From human poo to animal poo, researchers are embracing the brown stuff. They believe it’s scientific gold, ...
  • 2018
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/17/2018

The Nature of Things Myth or Science: The Secrets of Our Senses

Join Dr. Jennifer Gardy on an international odyssey to understand how the senses really work. Although our senses are crucial to our survival, we actually know very little about them. But now there is a revolution going on. A new breed of scientists is conducting unique and sometimes bizarre experiments to trick our brain into revealing the secrets of our ...
  • 2017
  • 00:42:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/03/2017

Canadian Museum of Nature National Biodiversity Cryobank of Canada: Frozen DNA

Learn about the National Biodiversity Cryobank of Canada. This new facility to support the study of species diversity is the first of its kind in Canada with a national mandate. It preserves frozen animal and plant tissues as well as associated genetic material.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/23/2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Native mussels fight back

Find out how some native mussels are hanging on... despite the dire threat by invasive zebra mussels. Mussel expert André Martel takes us to the Rideau River in Smith Falls, Ontario.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/23/2020

The Nature of Things Nature Bites Back: The Case of the Sea Otter

In breathtaking detail, high-definition cameras capture the behaviour of this aquatic favourite. Sea otters were nearly wiped out by the fur trade 200 years ago, with only a handful remaining in remote outposts as a curious relic. But 30 years ago, biologists began resurrecting the species in a living experiment. It worked brilliantly, but with unforeseen consequences. This fascinating story ...
  • 2005
  • 00:45:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The Nature of Things Nature's Cleanup Crew

To us, it’s garbage. To them, it’s dinner. There are some busy scavengers who live among us — vultures, ants, foxes, opossums and others. Meet the unsung animal heroes who share our urban spaces and clean up our mess. Debunking some myths along the way, this documentary helps us learn what adaptations they have evolved for this “messy” job, what ...
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/17/2020

The Homestretch Needled: The Christmas Tree Genome

University of California Davis genetics professor David Neale details research into mapping genomes of conifers and why the trees have such complex DNA.
  • 2012
  • 00:06:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/09/2013

Alien Deep Ocean's Fury

Waves may be getting bigger and badder, ocean patterns may be shifting, seas are rising and scientists are just starting to figure out why. Dr. Robert Ballard and a team of scientists go in search of answers. What we don't know about the ocean is alarming – waves that defy gravity, uncharted deep-sea currents, even alien creatures that move as ...
  • 2012
  • 00:45:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/04/2016

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Earth: A New Wild Oceans

Sanjayan goes in search of a very different future. He travels to one of the remotest reefs on earth. The sheer number of sharks in this place doesn’t make any sense – the mass of predators is greater than prey. It seems like a paradox. But when you understand it, you see how our oceans can be more productive than ...
  • 2014
  • 00:44:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/18/2016

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As It Happens Octopus Broods Eggs over Four Years

An octopus off the coast of California has broken the record for the longest brood. The dedicated mom guarded her eggs for 53 months until they were ready to hatch. So why such a long brood? "There's a tremendous advantage to being well-developed when you hatch," researcher Bruce Robison tells As It Happens. Robison led the research at the Monterey Bay ...
  • 2014
  • 00:08:49
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 08/08/2014

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