Monster Math Squad Falls Apart Monster Nose Woes

Falls Apart Monster is missing his nose after bumping into another monster, and he needs the Squad to help him find it! The first thing they do is use a Math Monitor to make a sketch of the mystery monster, based on FAPM’s description. Except the sketch is very silly-looking! But they learn this is because they haven’t put the ...
  • 2011
  • 00:12:30
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 07/30/2013

The Code Fractal geometry in nature and digital animation

Marcus du Sautoy describes how fractal geometry can be used to describe natural objects, and how it is used in digital animation. Trees use the simple rule of trying to maximize surface area, and this is something that can be simulated mathematically to give a very realistic result. Mandelbrot explored this fractal property of infinite complexity in his work, which ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Monster Math Squad Garbage Monster Delivers

In the town of Monstrovia, the Garbage Monster delivers garbage to everyone's house! Garbage Monster can't figure out how to get the garbage orders correct. The Monster Math Squad needs to learn about SORTING in order to get the correct garbage into the correct bins. Sorting by colour and shape, the Squad help Garbage Monster separate the stinky monster slime ...
  • 2011
  • 00:12:30
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 07/30/2013

The Code Hexagons in the natural world

Marcus du Sautoy visits a beekeeper and explores how bees create their honeycombs. If they are going to tessellate they have a limited number of regular polygons they could choose from, but the hexagon is the most efficient – giving the maximum storage area for the least amount of wax. In fact, the bees do not create hexagons, but circular ...
  • 2011
  • 00:05:13
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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BBC Bitesize How computers have changed

Computers are everywhere today and they can do things very fast. In the past they were much slower and much bigger. Computers have changed a lot over time. There have been some important people who have helped change what computers can do. They include Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace and Alan Turing, who are featured in this video.
  • 2017
  • 00:01:16
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/23/2021

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A World Without Maths How to use arrays to multiply

Mr Sharma needs to buy new pencils for the school but they only come in boxes of 5. How does he know how many he’s got? His attempts at guessing leave Mrs Barker in a sticky situation. This sounds like a job for Multiplication Boy! Luckily, our hero in A World Without Maths knows what to do. He speeds up ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:52
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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A World Without Maths How to use mental methods to divide

Charlie has won a huge bunch of balloons, so huge they have put him in something of a precarious position. But he’s not going to give them up easily. He won them fair and square after all. Dave suggests sharing them out, so they can all help him carry them home. This sounds like a job for Divider Girl! Divider ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:43
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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A World Without Maths How to use mental methods to multiply

Mr and Mrs Sharma can’t work out how many sausages to buy for Charlie’s birthday party. They are trying to count it out using chocolate buttons, but they are getting in a mess. This sounds like a job for Multiplication Boy! Multiplication Boy comes to the rescue, but loses his trusty number line en route. Can he find another way ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:21
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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The Code Imaginary numbers at use in the real world

Starting with the logical roots of arithmetic with negative numbers, Marcus du Sautoy explains how mathematicians created imaginary numbers by ‘imagining’ the square root of -1. Though imaginary in nature, he then explores how this abstract mathematical idea has become vital to air traffic control systems. Teacher notes: Use as an enrichment and extension clip during a series of lessons ...
  • 2011
  • 00:04:33
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 09/03/2019

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Monster Math Squad Little Wally Ball-y Monster

Mr Googly Eyed Monster needs help to get his Wally Ball-y rolling again, so he calls on the Monster Math Squad! They learn that what Wally Ball-y needs is to be on a slope, which will help him get rolling. Goo makes himself into a slope, but they discover that for this slope to work, Wally Ball-y needs to go ...
  • 2011
  • 00:12:30
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 07/30/2013

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