News in Review - March 2001 Cloning Human Embryos: Ethical Quandary

Britain and other governments have recently taken the controversial step of allowing scientists to clone human embryos for medical research. As has occurred in many countries, an ethical debate on human cloning and its related issues has raged in Canada for a number of years since the technology to do so has become more of a reality. Canada, however, has ...
  • 2001
  • 00:11:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/15/2001

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Archives subscribers.

More details

Découverte Code Orange

What really happened on September 13, 2006 at Montreal General Hospital’s Emergency Department? As soon as word came in that a gunman had begun his carnage at Dawson College, hospital staff began to prepare. Many victims were saved by the rapid and highly competent work of paramedics and the hospital’s trauma team.
  • 2008
  • 00:48:56
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 10/08/2014

News in Review - May 2003 Confronting The SARS Outbreak

A mysterious disease that causes flu-like symptoms and pneumonia is quickly spreading around the word and has made its way to Canada. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, has killed hundreds and sickened thousands. News in Review examines the efforts being made to identify the cause and halt the spread of this dangerous disease.
  • 2003
  • 00:15:53
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/15/2003

Access to this content is reserved to News in Review | Archives subscribers.

More details

The Nature of Things Cracking Cancer

POG – Personalized OncoGenomics – is the subject of the gripping new documentary. With exclusive and rare access, Cracking Cancer follows a group of patients, all with incurable cancer, through the highly experimental clinical trial at the BC Cancer Agency, a trial that holds the promise of personalized cancer diagnosis and treatment.
  • 2017
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/24/2017

The Nature of Things Cuba: The Accidental Revolution – Health Care (Part 2 of 2)

Despite the collapse of the Soviet Union, Cubans were able to maintain the backbone of their society — an elevated standard of social programs. The Cuban government believes universal access to education and health care are fundamental to their economic success. Keeping pace with doctors who make regular house calls and visiting a rural school with solar-powered computers, this is ...
  • 2006
  • 00:45:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The Nature of Things Dad and the Dandelions

A filmmaker tries to unlock the mystery behind his father's blood cancer, Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. Is there a connection to golf's manicured perfection? In the world of pearl white bunkers and velvety putting greens, Andrew Nisker discovers that these “greenspaces” are anything but. Along the way he meets numerous experts including Jay Feldman, urban planner and Executive Director of the non-profit ...
  • 2017
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/24/2017

The Fifth Estate Dead Enough

It’s a question you might think medical science would have answered long ago — when are you dead? But in Dead Enough, The Fifth Estate explores how the standards for when and how people are declared dead can vary from province to province and even from hospital to hospital. Host Bob McKeown looks at how, in the rush to meet the need for ...
  • 2014
  • 00:38:48
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 08/27/2014

The Fifth Estate Death in Paradise

It's a story that has become tragically familiar: travellers, often young and healthy, visit sun splashed tourist destinations, fall ill and suddenly die. In the sudden deaths of Canadians Noémi and Audrey Bélanger, Thai authorities are quick to speculate on what might have happened, including drugs and food poisoning. There are even suspicions about a toxic cocktail laced with a ...
  • 2013
  • 00:42:37
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 10/20/2014

The Nature of Things Designing for Dignity: Engineering for Body Parts

The body is nature's work of art. It is no surprise then that providing replacement pieces for it requires both the talents of an artist and the skills of a surgeon. Ears made to order. Knee joints from an assembly line. Replacement heart valves grown from human cells in the laboratory. For people with damaged or missing body parts, new ...
  • 1999
  • 00:53:43
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

The National Desperate Acts: Suicide and the Elderly

We meet three people who have decided to break the silence and share their stories, speaking out about the despair that led them to try to end their lives. Seniors feeling frail, isolated and depressed are the most likely to turn to suicide. How can families, the medical community and society help those at risk?
  • 2000
  • 00:23:38
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 06/14/2013