The National Trudeau exonerates wrongfully convicted Chief Poundmaker

In the hills of west-central Saskatchewan, on the reserve that bears the name of a revered and wrongly convicted First Nations leader, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau set right a historic wrong: exonerating the Cree Chief Poundmaker and recognizing his true legacy.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

The National Indian day school survivors await settlement

It’s taken a decade to hammer out a compensation package for survivors of Indian day schools, but this week a federal court in Winnipeg is holding hearings on a tentative settlement worth $1.4 billion.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/23/2019

CBC News Who are the Métis? Must-See

Who is and who isn't “Métis” is a controversial topic. We hear different perspectives from the leader of the Manitoba Métis Federation and the self-described Grand Chief of an Eastern Métis organization from Nova Scotia.
  • 2019
  • 00:05:49
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 07/22/2019

The National McGill dumps Redmen team name after calls from Indigenous community

Montreal's McGill University has announced it will change the name of its men's varsity sports teams – the Redmen – after Indigenous students, faculty and staff said the name is discriminatory.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National A Canadian artist's efforts to capture stories of survival

A Saskatoon artist is using her portraits to examine two groups that suffered through oppression; in a way, bringing them face to face.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/28/2019

The National As Nunavut struggles with food insecurity, students step up to help feed their peers

Food prices in Canada's north are so high that seven out of 10 young people there go hungry. A Nunavut high school is now trying to fight this food insecurity with a free hot lunch program run by the school's food studies class.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:32
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 05/13/2019

The National Indigenous graves have B.C. landowners pitted against the government

Thousands of sites in British Columbia are believed to be ancient First Nations burial grounds. Some are on private lands, and many Indigenous people believe these sites are sacred. But the government doesn't see the burial sites the same way as registered cemeteries, and that has left all parties frustrated and feeling vulnerable.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/02/2019

The National Justin Trudeau makes historic apology for past governments' mistreatment of Inuit with tuberculosis

Justin Trudeau has made a historic apology for past governments’ “colonial” and “purposeful” mistreatment of Inuit people with tuberculosis, which included taking them from their families.
  • 2019
  • 00:04:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Tina Fontaine report: “Not enough has changed” since teen’s death, says advocate

Tina Fontaine died in 2014. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since, not enough has changed to ensure other children don’t die.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

The National Political cartoons: Where free speech runs up against poor taste

For the second time in two weeks, a political cartoonist is apologizing for his depiction of former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould in newspaper commentary on the SNC-Lavalin scandal. So, in an arena where free speech runs up against poor taste, is there a line? And if so, who defines it?
  • 2019
  • 00:02:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

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