Contemporary Indigenous Voices

This collection focuses on cultural awareness, traditional knowledge and the contemporary challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples across Canada as we begin to explore reconciliation together. The collection touches on issues like adapting to climate change, overcoming the errors of colonialism, improving access to resources and services, building stronger local economies and more. The voices presented here – whether young people, women, elders, artists, advocates, entrepreneurs or educators – reflect the diverse perspectives within Métis, Inuit and First Nations communities. The collection also highlights the overarching importance of traditional territories and relationship with the land.

  • 2017
  • 9-12
  • 65 Titles

Included in this collection

CBC Short Docs Headdress

“To me, the headdress is a symbol of leadership.” JJ Neepin is a female Indigenous filmmaker, and with the help of photographer Nadya Kwandibens, she plans to recreate her great-grandfather’s portrait. The headdress is a powerful symbol with great meaning in First Nations communities. Headdress is the start of an ongoing conversation about tradition and cultural appropriation.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2017

Man Alive Healing Justice

Native peoples believe our justice system has failed them. Healing Justice looks at the native model of justice which is based on reconciliation and harmony rather than punishment. To find out how this system works and what we can learn from it, we travel to the remote Native community of Muskrat Dam and to the Aboriginal Legal Services in Toronto. ...
  • 1996
  • 00:24:14
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

CBC News How to talk about Indigenous people New

Ever wonder how to use the proper terms when referring to Indigenous peoples? Inuk journalist Ossie Michelin leads us through this friendly how-to guide.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 09/12/2018

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Ideas Human Rights and Today's Aboriginal Children and Youth

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond is British Columbia's Representative for Children and Youth. She believes the welfare of aboriginal children is a human rights issue. In the 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture, Turpel-Lafond makes the case there's been little progress on the human rights of First Nation's children in today's Canada. The 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture is presented in collaboration with ...
  • 2013
  • 00:54:00
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/13/2014

News in Review - March 2013 Idle No More: A Protest for Aboriginal Rights

What began as an online conversation about native rights quickly put Canada into the international spotlight as a movement called Idle No More popped up across the country. It was prompted by the federal government introducing Bill C‐45 which would have a significant impact on the lives of indigenous peoples.
  • 2013
  • 00:19:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/15/2013

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • Idle No More: A Protest for Aboriginal Rights

The National Influential filmmakers react to state of Indigenous film in Canada

The National spoke to three influential filmmakers about the state of Indigenous film in Canada. CBC Radio host Duncan McCue is joined by filmmakers Lisa Jackson and Alethea Arnaquq-Baril and the director of Canada's new Indigenous Screen Office, Jesse Wente.
  • 2018
  • 00:10:42
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 07/11/2018

Ideas It Feels Like We're On the Cusp: First Nations and the Future of Canadian Citizenship

Part history lesson, part memoir, the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations takes to the stage to share stories of the people he represents and his own past. In his lecture titled It Feels Like We're On the Cusp, National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo sets out why he believes First Nations peoples are on the cusp of change. The ...
  • 2013
  • 00:53:59
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 02/13/2014

8th Fire It's Time!

It's Time! challenges Canadians with this reality: if we don't improve our relationship with Aboriginal people, we will cripple our economy. Both the footage and the argument come in high definition and make the case that Canada is changing beneath our feet. In a dynamic two-minute walk through 500 years of history, 8th Fire host Wab Kinew explains how ancient Wampum belts hold ...
  • 2012
  • 00:43:29
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

Teacher Guide(s)

  • 8th Fire Teacher Resource Guide