Diversity and Inclusion

Our diversity as Canadians is one of our distinctive traits as a country. In this collection, we examine the triumphs, lessons, struggles and challenges that continue to shape our multifaceted identity.

  • 2016
  • 13-14
  • 43 Titles

Included in this collection

ReVision Quest Ghetto-ization, or Assimilation?

Is affirmative action the model for all things native? From music awards to education, First Nations get their own categories.
  • 2009
  • 00:27:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/05/2013

CBC Short Docs Home No More

In the aftermath of the terrorist attack on a Quebec City mosque, three Muslim women contemplate leaving the place they call home. Home No More explores what it’s like living as a Muslim woman in Quebec City, one year after one of Canada’s worst terrorist attacks — the deadly shooting at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec (CCIQ) on January ...
  • 2018
  • 00:19:15
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 08/14/2018

News in Review - May 2010 How Tolerant Are Canadians?

Canada is a multicultural country where people of many races and backgrounds live in harmony together. Most of us are proud of our diversity, and like to think we live in a country where prejudice isn’t a problem. But how tolerant are we? In this News in Review story we’ll look at how a racist incident shocked a community. We’ll ...
  • 2010
  • 00:15:41
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/15/2010

Due to rights limitations, News in Review | Archives content is not freely available.

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • How Tolerant Are Canadians?

The National Language barrier stops Canadian films from getting funding

A heavily criticized language barrier is stopping some Canadian films from getting money from the federal funding agency Telefilm Canada. To qualify for Telefilm funding, the movies must be in French, English or an Indigenous language. However, many films that win big at the Canadian Screen Awards are in other languages. Their directors hope Telefilm changes its rules soon so ...
  • 2018
  • 00:03:39
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/13/2018

The Sunday Edition Living in Hope: Viola Desmond's Story Classroom Favourites

This special presentation from CBC Radio's Sunday Edition is a dramatized account of a pivotal moment in Canadian race relations. On November 8, 1946 Viola Desmond refuses to move to the upstairs balcony in the Roseland Theatre, and is forcibly removed from the theatre and thrown in jail. The resulting legal battle was taken all the way to the Nova Scotia Supreme ...
  • 2007
  • 00:54:30
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/02/2017

News in Review - November 2006 Michaëlle Jean: Our Governor General

On September 27, 2005, Michaëlle Jean was sworn in as Canada's Governor General. Since then she has brought her own sense of purpose and style to her job as the Queen's representative. In this News in Review story we'll look at Michalle Jean's first year in office. We'll travel with her to Haiti, the country where she was born. We'll ...
  • 2006
  • 00:17:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/15/2006

Due to rights limitations, News in Review | Archives content is not freely available.

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • Michaelle Jean: Our Governor General

Mansbridge One on One Nadine Caron: Canada's first female Indigenous surgeon

Nadine Caron is Canada's first female Indigenous general surgeon. As she explains to in her conversation with Peter Mansbridge, that hasn't shielded her from encountering racism in Canada's health-care system.
  • 2016
  • 00:22:21
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/03/2017

Firsthand Once an Immigrant

What is Canadian identity? And how do the children of immigrants relate to the country they were born in, often thousands of miles from the place their parents and ancestors would call home? Peter Keleghan is a renowned actor and uber-patriotic first generation Canadian. His Irish mother and Polish father have complex relationships to their adoptive homeland, and the homes ...
  • 2017
  • 00:43:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/26/2017