Forest Fires and Climate Change

In the summer of 2017, 1.22 million hectares of the B.C. landscape went up in smoke in what was then a record-breaking wildfire season. This trend was repeated in 2018, with this time 1.33 million hectares burning. Two years earlier, the Fort McMurray wildfire — known as “the Beast” — forced the evacuation of nearly 90,000 residents in what became the largest wildfire in Alberta's history.​ Is this the new normal? Can we expect the situation to get even worse? In this collection we examine what role climate change is playing in lighting a flame to Canadian forests.

  • 2018
  • 13-14
  • 11 Titles

Included in this collection

News in Review - September 2017 B.C. Burning: 2017 Summer of the Wildfires

In 2017, British Columbia experienced its worst wildfire season in its history. At its height 45,000 people were forced to flee their homes and more than 900,000 hectares were burning. This item looks at B.C.’s summer of the wildfire and examines the role that climate change is playing in terms of longer fire seasons and what it means for future ...
  • 2017
  • 00:15:46
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/26/2017

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • NIR-17-09 - B.C. Burning: 2017 Summer of the Wildfires

The National B.C. tourism industry hit hard by wildfires

B.C.'s tourism industry has been hit hard, but the threat of wildfires isn't the only reason: heavy smoke is making lots of potential tourists reconsider outdoor activities.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:59
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

The National California wildfires impact marine life

The Thomas wildfire in California that destroyed more than 1,000 structures late last year also affected marine life. CBC’s Kim Brunhuber looks at how the fires had an impact on life in the Pacific Ocean.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 05/23/2018

CBC News Extreme Canadian Weather: Fire & Ice (Part 2 of 2)

Part 2 of the Extreme Canadian Weather series looks at Canada's worst fire and ice disasters, including BC's deadly 2003 forest fires and the Quebec and Ontario ice storm of 1998.
  • 2005
  • 00:45:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 06/14/2013

News in Review - October 2018 Extreme Weather 2018: Is this Climate Change?

Climate on this planet is always changing. Over hundreds of thousands of years there have been heating and cooling events, with at least five ice ages. Most of these variations can be attributed to Earth’s orbit, the sun’s radiation and the planet heating. However, since the 19th century scientists believe that the rapid heating of the earth is a result ...
  • 2018
  • 00:18:22
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/10/2018

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • NIR-18-10 - PDF - Extreme Weather 2018: Is this Climate Change?

  • NIR-18-10 - PPT - Extreme Weather 2018: Is this Climate Change?

News in Review - October 2003 Forest Fires: Battling the Monster

It was a season of flames in British Columbia and Alberta. Warm weather and a lack of rain combined this summer to create raging fires that forced thousands of residents to flee for their lives, destroyed millions of acres of forest and reduced hundreds of homes to smouldering embers. News in Review looks at how residents coped with what many ...
  • 2003
  • 00:14:03
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/15/2003

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  • Forest Fires: Battling the Monster

News in Review - September 1994 Forest Fires: Fighting Nature

To what extent should and can we intervene in nature? This story looks at the annual ravages of forest fires and how we attempt to control them.
  • 1994
  • 00:07:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/15/1994

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The Nature of Things Into the Fire

Nature created it. Humans harnessed it. And now, as climate change helps light a flame to our forests, scientists are desperately trying to understand fire. In the summer of 2017, more than one million hectares of the B.C. landscape went up in smoke. In 2016, the Fort McMurray wildfire — known as “the Beast” — forced the evacuation of nearly ...
  • 2017
  • 00:45:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/27/2017