Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

The statistics on missing and murdered Indigenous women are stark and staggering. A 2015 United Nations report found that young Indigenous women are five times more likely to die under violent circumstances, as compared with their non-Indigenous counterparts. It also reported that Indigenous women report rates of violence 3.5 times higher than non-Indigenous women. Following the UN report’s recommendation, the Liberals announced the first phase of an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women in December 2015.

The videos in this collection present a snapshot of the situation and recount the stories of the families and communities affected by this national tragedy.

CBC News has probed 230 unsolved cases of Canada’s missing and murdered Indigenous women, confirming them through an exhaustive process that included checks with police, families, community leaders and other organizations. More than 110 families participated in interviews, recounting stories about their loved ones. They also described their experiences with the police. For more information, please visit the CBC interactive website Missing & Murdered: The Unsolved Cases of Indigenous Women and Girls.

Warning: The videos in this collection contain strong language and mature content. Viewer discretion is advised.

  • 2016
  • 15-17
  • 22 Titles

Teacher Guide(s)

  • NIR-14-10 - Canada's Disgrace: Our Missing Aboriginal Women

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The Current The inquiry itself is not the solution: Pam Palmater

Pam Palmater, Mi'kmaw lawyer and professor, shares her insights on lessons learned from past inquiries at a public forum on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) hosted by CBC's The Current.
  • 2017
  • 00:00:54
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2017

The National The MMIWG Inquiry | Up to Speed

The national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls began last year, but advocacy groups and some families have been critical of the process. Some say the inquiry has struggled to connect with the families of the victims.
  • 2017
  • 00:05:28
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2017

The National The Unsolved Murder of Leah Anderson

Hundreds of cases of missing or murdered Indigenous women remain unsolved. But while those numbers reveal the scope, they can also obscure the individual. Because each woman, each girl has her own story. Connie Walker reached into an isolated Manitoba community and talked to family and friends of Leah Anderson about her murder and the police investigation. The unsolved slaying ...
  • 2015
  • 00:14:05
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 12/10/2015

The National Tina Fontaine report: “Not enough has changed” since teen’s death, says advocate

Tina Fontaine died in 2014. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since, not enough has changed to ensure other children don’t die.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:19
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/26/2019

News in Review - October 2019 Tina Fontaine: A Murdered Girl's Legacy

Tina Fontaine was just 15 when her body, wrapped in a duvet cover and weighed down by rocks, was pulled from Winnipeg’s Red River. A report from the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth says in the years since her murder, not enough has changed to ensure other children in circumstances similar to Tina’s are not at risk. But Tina ...
  • 2019
  • 00:12:09
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/17/2019

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Teacher Guide(s)

  • NIR-19-10 - PPT - Tina Fontaine: A Murdered Girl's Legacy

  • NIR-19-10 - PDF - Tina Fontaine: A Murdered Girl's Legacy

The National Why murder victims' identities should be made public

Relatives say the identities of murder victims should be made public, to prevent them from becoming statistics. The push is in response to a proposed policy in Regina to keep the victims' names a secret. The argument is that there is nothing to gain by releasing them.
  • 2018
  • 00:03:59
  • 15-17
  • Added on: 08/03/2018