Reconciliation: Creating New Relationships

At the centre of this collection is Gord Downie's The Secret Path, an emotional animated film following the last days of Chanie Wenjack as he tried to escape residential school. In addition, stories and interviews with the Wenjack family, Indigenous artists and leaders explore the ongoing and necessary work of building new relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and communities.

  • 2016
  • 13-14
  • 15 Titles

Included in this collection

CBC Arts The Secret Path

This powerful animated film tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year-old Ojibwa boy who died of exposure in 1966 while running away from Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School near Kenora, Ontario. The story is told through music by Tragically Hip frontman Gord Downie and illustrations by graphic novelist Jeff Lemire. The Secret Path acknowledges a dark part of Canada’s history — ...
  • 2016
  • 00:59:55
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 11/09/2016

CBC Short Docs The Secret Path: Ahead by a Century

A group of Ontario high school students write and perform a play that honours Gord Downie’s music and Secret Path project. On the day of the dress rehearsal, drama teacher Scott Garbe invites a very special guest to watch scenes from the play. Tim “Redfeather” Thomas, a 74-year-old Mi'kmaq elder, talks about his own experiences in residential school with the cast.
  • 2017
  • 00:06:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/04/2017

CBC Short Docs The Secret Path: Freedom to Speak New

A group of inmates at Toronto South Detention Centre are studying Secret Path, Gord Downie and Jeff Lemire’s graphic novel about Chanie Wenjack. Chanie was a young Anishinaabe boy who died while running away from residential school in 1966 — simply because he wanted to go home. Many themes in Chanie’s story resonate with these inmates: isolation, identity, fear, anger, the ...
  • 2017
  • 00:08:18
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 12/12/2017

CBC Short Docs The Secret Path: In The Classroom

Gord Downie's Secret Path tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a young boy who died trying to get home from residential school in 1966. It's been taught in classrooms across Canada this year. Daisy and Pearl Wenjack, Chanie's sisters, visit a school in Toronto where the children have a special surprise for the family.
  • 2017
  • 00:09:37
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 10/05/2017

Teacher Guide(s)

  • How to Use Video Effectively in the Classroom [.pdf]

Canadian History: A Conversation Treaties, Reconciliation and Indigenous History in Canada

How well do Canadians know Indigenous history? What role did treaties play in forming our country? Are the stories told through truth and reconciliation changing our understanding of Canadian history? Moderated by award-winning journalist Duncan McCue, host of Cross Country Checkup on CBC Radio, the panel includes Ry Moran, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation; Cynthia Wesley-Eskuimaux, Lakehead University; and Eldon Yellowhorn, ...
  • 2017
  • 00:54:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/10/2017

Teacher Guide(s)

  • Canada: The Story of Us Teacher Guide

George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight Wab Kinew: Full Interview (Part 1 of 2)

Why are stereotypes of Indigenous people so prominent in Canada? Why is it so hard to get non-Native Canadians to pay attention to the experiences that Indigenous people have endured? Wab Kinew talks with George Stroumboulopoulos about some of the problems facing Canadian society — and suggests some possible solutions.
  • 2012
  • 00:11:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 10/25/2017

The Current Why don't residential school survivors just get over it?: Murray Sinclair

To those who ask why Indigenous people don't just "get over" the residential school experience, Senator Murray Sinclair has this response: "My answer has always been: Why can't you always remember this?" Sinclair was speaking at one of The Current's public forum on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG).
  • 2017
  • 00:01:32
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 09/13/2017