The National

The National is CBC's flagship news program, featuring in depth and original journalism, with hosts Adrienne Arsenault and Ian Hanomansing in Toronto, Rosemary Barton in Ottawa, and Andrew Chang in Vancouver.

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Episodes

The National How changing language could help in the fight against opioids

If you had any doubt about whether Canada's opioid crisis was getting better or worse, the latest numbers tell a big part of that story: it's still out of control. More than 9,000 people died between January 2016 and June 2018. There's a lot of talk about how to turn things around, but there may be another side to it ...
  • 2018
  • 00:02:33
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/11/2019

The National How do you feed a world dealing with climate change?

As the planet keeps on warming, new technology aims to mitigate climate change to some extent. However, some warming has already happened. With more to come, people will need to adapt. Consider the stakes in Africa. Countries there already import billions worth of food. If the deserts keep encroaching, if the droughts get worse, feeding people will get harder and ...
  • 2018
  • 00:04:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Canadian archeologists part of major discovery that could rewrite history

It's a region on the border of war, but that hasn't stopped a team of Canadian archeologists from trying to solve a mystery in southern Turkey. And now, after decades of digging, they've made a major discovery — one that reveals the powerful role of women, and it could rewrite history.
  • 2019
  • 00:03:01
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Shelter aims to help growing number of refugees arriving as unaccompanied minors

Refugee advocates say that over the past 20 years there's been an increase in the number of unaccompanied youths arriving in Canada. These minors face the dual challenge of adapting to their new environment while also being children missing their parents. For those alone and with nowhere to go, a Toronto shelter looks to give them the support they need. 
  • 2019
  • 00:04:10
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National The resurgence of poetry through a modern medium

Poetry is having a huge surge, largely through the growing popularity of so-called "Insta-poets." These young writers built their audience using Instagram, and have now drifted into the world of celebrity, gracing the front rows of fashion shows and getting celebrity endorsements.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:44
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Ottawa unveils air passenger bill of rights

The federal government released draft rules aimed at forcing airlines to provide better customer service, including possible compensation for passengers who are bumped from flights due to overbooking.
  • 2018
  • 00:05:48
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Diversity in film now extending to critics

CBC News looks at how the Toronto International Film Festival is helping more diverse movie reviewers in the spotlight this year.
  • 2018
  • 00:04:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Not your average tech company: What is Huawei and why it matters

Meng Wanzhou, deputy chair and CFO for the Chinese tech giant Huawei, is reportedly wanted by the United States for allegedly contravening U.S. trade sanctions against Iran. This, however, isn't the first time the tech giant has been under scrutiny internationally for its close ties to the Chinese government.
  • 2018
  • 00:01:11
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/01/2019

The National Ontario judge says carding has little to no value as a policing tool

An Ontario judge who earlier this week called for the elimination of random street checks said carding only generates "low quality intelligence" and alienates certain communities from the police.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:31
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019

The National Saskatchewan's apology for Sixties Scoop leaves survivors with mixed feelings

Starting in the 1950s, about 20,000 Indigenous children across Canada were seized from their birth families and relocated to non-Indigenous homes, where many were stripped of their language, culture and any ties to their families. For some, the apology was long overdue and welcomed. For others, the words rang hollow.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:47
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 01/22/2019