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English language -- Study and teaching  

CBC | Radio-Canada (Eng) Celebrating Indigenous stories with the Turtle Island Reads Book Club 2019

Turtle Island Reads celebrates stories written by and about Indigenous people in Canada. Hosted by Rosanna Deerchild and featuring Tracey Deer, Lucy Tulugarjuk and Dayna Danger, the 2019 book club discusses how the modern Indigenous experience is reflected in literature and why bringing Indigenous books into the classroom is important. The panel and students from three different high schools explore ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:00
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 14 juin 2021

CBC Books Canada Reads 2021: Butter Honey Pig Bread by Francesca Ekwuyasi

Francesca Ekwuyasi's debut novel, Butter Honey Pig Bread, is a literary feast for the mind, the soul and the senses. Butter Honey Pig Bread is a novel about twin sisters, Kehinde and Taiye, and their mother, Kambirinachi. Kambirinachi believes she was a spirit who was supposed to die as a small child. By staying alive, she is cursing her family ...
  • 2021
  • 00:14:59
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 3 mars 2021

CBC Books Canada Reads 2021: Hench by Natalie Zina Walschots

Natalie Zina Walschots is a writer and journalist from Toronto. She is also the author of the poetry collections DOOM: Love Poems for Supervillains and Thumbscrews. Hench is her first novel. Hench is a novel about Anna, a woman who pays the bills by doing administrative work for villains. But when an incident involving the world's most popular superhero leaves ...
  • 2021
  • 00:13:51
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 2 mars 2021

CBC Books Canada Reads 2021: The Midnight Bargain by C.L. Polk

Set in a fantasy land named Chasland that feels like the Regency era in England, The Midnight Bargain is a fantasy about a woman named Beatrice Clayborn who makes her debut at "bargaining season" — an annual event where wealthy young men and women gather from all over the world to make advantageous marriages. But Beatrice dreams of becoming a ...
  • 2021
  • 00:13:12
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 2 mars 2021

CBC Books Canada Reads 2021: Jonny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead

Jonny Appleseed, Joshua Whitehead's debut novel, is the first book by an Indigenous author to win Canada Reads. The novel centres on the life of a two-spirit Indigiqueer young man who leaves the reserve and becomes a cybersex worker in the big city to make ends meet. But he must reckon with his past when he returns home to attend ...
  • 2021
  • 00:15:45
  • 15-17
  • Ajouté le: 2 mars 2021

CBC Books Canada Reads 2021: Two Trees Make a Forest by Jessica J. Lee

Scott Helman is championing Two Trees Make a Forest by writer and environmental historian Jessica J. Lee on Canada Reads 2021. In her memoir, Lee returns to her mother's homeland of Taiwan to understand the landscape that shaped her family — and in turn, shapes her. The book intertwines her grandparents' histories, the political history of Taiwan and the island's ...
  • 2021
  • 00:14:06
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 23 fév. 2021

CBC Books The First Page: Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow, best known for science fiction writing, talks about the importance of cutting the sentences you don't need when writing a story and how sci-fi writers drop clues for their readers about the kind of world they're living in. He reads the first page from Radicalized, his collection of four novellas that explore ethical questions surrounding how technology is abused ...
  • 2020
  • 00:03:35
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 6 nov. 2020

CBC Kids News A brief history of the Black Lives Matter movement Incontournables

CBC Kids News contributor Elijah Sandiford digs into the history of the Black Lives Matter movement. Historian and sociologist Afua Cooper describes some critical moments in black history and Vancouver activist Jacob Callender-Prasad talks about his role fighting anti-Black racism.
  • 2020
  • 00:07:00
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 9 juin 2020

CBC Kids News How to keep busy during coronavirus

Do you feel like you suddenly have a lot of free time on your hands? Schools are shut down across the country, but because of social distancing, your activities are also limited. You can’t go to the movies or hang out with large groups of friends. It’s hard to figure out what to do with all this free time, but ...
  • 2020
  • 00:02:11
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 31 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Can I go outside during the coronavirus outbreak?

Unsure whether or not you should be going outside right now? The short answer is yes — fresh air and exercise are important. But you should take some extra steps to make sure you’re staying safe. Many people are practicing social distancing to help prevent the spread of the virus. And some people are self-isolating because they have been — ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:22
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 30 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Why are schools closed for the coronavirus?

Extended March Break? Sweet! Or not? Some schools in Canada are shutting down to keep the coronavirus from spreading quickly. Even though kids who get the coronavirus are experiencing really mild symptoms, they can spread it, and that puts a strain on the health care system. If your school closes, you might still have homework and there will be plenty ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:11
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 30 mars 2020

CBC Kids News What is physical distancing?

We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social while still staying apart from each ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:35
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 30 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Will we run out of food during the coronavirus outbreak?

Have you seen pictures of empty grocery store shelves? That’s because people started stocking up on food and supplies when the government imposed strict rules on social distancing. But people who deliver food to grocery stores and who stock shelves are still working. They’re being extra careful so they don’t spread the coronavirus, but they’re still at work, so we ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:12
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 30 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Film about deadly shooting aims to make life safer for Indigenous kids

Tasha Hubbard, a Cree documentary filmmaker and mother, is touring a new film with the hope that it will help make Canada a safer place for Indigenous kids. Her film nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up — the Cree title is pronounced NEE-pa-wista-MAA-sowin — is about the controversial death of Colten Boushie in 2016. The 22-year-old man from Red Pheasant First ...
  • 2019
  • 00:04:01
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 24 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Deepfake videos explained

Did he really just say that? Probably not, if what we know about deepfake videos is true. Deepfake videos are videos that make it look like somebody is saying or doing something, when they never actually did. They’re usually made with a kind of artificial intelligence technology that makes it possible to turn a still photograph into a moving avatar. ...
  • 2019
  • 00:04:19
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 24 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Chinese New Year, kids style

Every year, millions of people celebrate the Lunar New Year in different parts of the world, including right here in Canada. Although it’s commonly referred to as the Chinese New Year, it’s actually the new year for anyone who follows the lunar calendar — as opposed to the Gregorian calendar, which we follow in North America. Many Asian countries and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:02:00
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 24 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Regina boy makes movie about fighting depression

Roman Fehr thought the short film he made about depression would be a school project that he submitted and quickly forgot about. Instead, it seems to have struck a chord. The 90-second animated video, called Overcoming the Darkness, is about a person who gets the help he needs to fight off depression. In the two weeks since the 13-year-old from Regina ...
  • 2019
  • 00:03:20
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 23 mars 2020

CBC Kids News David Saint-Jacques unveils Canada’s best little inventors

Check out the best new inventions for space — by kids. It was an experience that was out of this world for Connor Brown and Amy Claerhout. Their unique inventions for space were chosen as the winners of the Canadian Space Agency’s contest called Little Inventors. They were announced by astronaut David Saint-Jacques from the International Space Station last week. ...
  • 2019
  • 00:02:28
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 20 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Want to bring about positive change? Tips from kid activists

If 2019 was any indication, kids’ voices are louder than ever, as thousands of young Canadians have been taking part in mass demonstrations. The climate strikes that have been happening in nearly every city are a youth-led movement that’s become impossible for adults to ignore. But those aren’t the only youth-led marches we saw last year. In April, thousands of ...
  • 2020
  • 00:03:21
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 20 mars 2020

CBC Kids News What is flattening the curve?

Health officials keep talking about flattening the curve. Charlotte and Jimmy Greig, from Guelph, Ont., wanted to know what that means. Basically, it means people still get sick with the coronavirus, but over a longer period of time instead of all at once. That way, doctors are able to treat everyone who needs help, instead of having to deal with ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:22
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 mars 2020

CBC Kids News What does it mean to be self-isolated?

What does it mean to be self-isolated? It’s all about reducing the spread of the coronavirus. Have you heard about people being self-isolated because of the coronavirus? It’s happening more and more, including to our prime minister and his wife. Watch the video to find out what it means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:07
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 mars 2020

CBC Kids News What is social distancing?

Have you been told not to hug or touch your friends? That’s called social distancing. Why are we talking about this now? Some public health officials are encouraging social distancing as a way to keep the coronavirus from spreading. Check out this video for more on what that means.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:23
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 mars 2020

CBC Kids News Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic?

Why is the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic? It means it’s new and it’s spreading around the world. At first the coronavirus was called an outbreak. Then, on March 11, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced it was going to start calling it a pandemic. What’s a pandemic? A pandemic is a new virus that’s infecting a lot of people. It ...
  • 2020
  • 00:01:06
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 mars 2020

CBC Books Canada Reads 2020: Cory Doctorow on Radicalized

Radicalized by Cory Doctorow collects four science fiction novellas, all of which explore ethical questions surrounding how technology is abused on both personal and corporate levels. Cory Doctorow is a Toronto-born science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger.
  • 2020
  • 00:06:26
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 2 mars 2020

CBC Books Canada Reads 2020: Samra Habib on We Have Always Been Here

Samra Habib's first book spans continents — from Pakistan to Canada — as Habib describes her long journey through religious persecution, racism and embracing her identity as a queer Muslim woman. Samra Habib is a journalist, photographer and activist based in Toronto.
  • 2020
  • 00:04:05
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 2 mars 2020