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Canadian Museum of Nature What sharp teeth you have!

A look at hyenas, bears and the ancient sabre-toothed cat, Smilodon. Blade-like, scissor-like — the shape of the teeth determines how well an animal can exploit different types of food. For mammal researchers, teeth are the windows into the biology of the animal.
  • 2020
  • 00:02:13
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Mammoth vs. Mastodons

Both mastodons and mammoths were huge, elephant-like beasts that lived in the last ice age. Do you know how to tell them apart? Learn how from the fossil collection curator at the Canadian Museum of Nature.
  • 2014
  • 00:02:26
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Judith: New dinosaur species with an interesting story

Meet Judith — a new species of horned dinosaur nicknamed for the Judith River Formation in Montana, United States, where it was discovered. Judith was scientifically described and named Spiclypeus shipporum by museum palaeontologist Jordan Mallon.
  • 2016
  • 00:02:42
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Preparing a dinosaur for display

Ever wonder what it takes to put a dinosaur fossil on display? It starts with removing the fossil matrix from the field, a plaster jacket, and then delicate, patient extraction. Fossil preparation 101 — check it out!
  • 2019
  • 00:02:49
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Cool facts about the Moon!

How did the Earth’s moon form? What does the moon tell us about the solar system? Did you know at one point the moon was closer to Earth than it is now? Find out more!
  • 2019
  • 00:03:53
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Let's Talk About Canadian Volcanoes

The extensive geological diversity of Canada includes young volcanoes. Learn more from Erika Anderson, who’s studied volcanoes and who is the Curator of Mineralogy at the Canadian Museum of Nature.
  • 2019
  • 00:02:46
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 3 août 2020

The Nature of Things Listening to Orcas

Since the 1960s, our knowledge of orcas has evolved. This whale species once feared as apex predators and “killers of the deep” are now seen as extraordinarily intelligent, emotional, and social animals. In this documentary from The Nature of Things, marine biologist Dr. Sarika Cullis-Suzuki meets up with some of the scientists who have transformed our awareness of orcas.
  • 2020
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 17 juil. 2020

The Nature of Things First Animals

For most of its existence, planet Earth has been a brutal, inhospitable, toxic nightmare, until a half billion years ago when – KABOOM! – life suddenly appeared. First Animals takes you back to the Cambrian Explosion through newly-discovered fossils that tell us more about our own origins. Renowned evolutionary biologist Maydianne Andrade is our guide, showing us how complex – and ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 17 juil. 2020

The Nature of Things Grasslands: A Hidden Wilderness

Today the wild prairie is a shadow of its former self. Temperate grasslands, as a whole, are now considered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature to be the most endangered — and least protected — habitat type in the world. Prior to European settlement, North America’s Great Plains were home to enormous, thundering herds of bison. Wolves ...
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 16 juil. 2020

The Nature of Things Living Colour

A captivating exploration of the science of colour, Living Colour features scientists who are fascinated by how we experience colour. They look at how babies see colour, how colour blindness impacts people's lives, how a cross-wiring of the senses called synesthesia can connect colour and sound, how language and memory influence colour perception, and more!
  • 2019
  • 00:44:09
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 16 juil. 2020

The Nature of Things Be Afraid: The Science of Fear

Why do some people seek out terrifying experiences while others avoid fear at all costs? Why does fear spur some to fight and leave others frozen? Although the emotion of fear is as old as life itself, scientists are asking new questions and getting new answers about how our brains process it.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:10
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 15 juil. 2020

The Nature of Things She Walks With Apes

This is the epic story of three women who embarked on lifelong journeys to study and protect humanity’s closest living relatives: the great apes. Jane Goodall, who left England to live with the chimpanzees of Tanzania and became one of the most famous scientists of our time; American Dian Fossey, who championed the mountain gorillas of Rwanda and, though she ...
  • 2019
  • 01:28:30
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 13 juil. 2020

The National Luck and sound decisions helped B.C. avoid worst-case COVID-19 scenario

British Columbia avoided the worst-case scenario during the COVID-19 pandemic largely because of its well co-ordinated messaging, sound decisions and a little bit of luck.
  • 2020
  • 00:06:44
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 9 juil. 2020

CBC News Explainer: What's missing when we talk while wearing protective masks?

CBC News asked two experts what's lost from the human experience when one of our biggest tools of communication is eclipsed and muffled by cloth.
  • 2020
  • 00:05:38
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 7 juil. 2020

The National Dexamethasone shows promise treating severe COVID-19 patients

Researchers in the U.K. say dexamethasone, a widely available corticosteroid, reduced COVID-19 deaths by up to one-third in severely ill hospitalized patients.
  • 2020
  • 00:03:38
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 3 juil. 2020

The National Scientists develop an app that tracks how COVID-19 mutates person-to-person

Computer scientists at Toronto's Peter Munk Cardiac Centre have developed an app that can track how COVID-19 is mutating as it spreads from person-to-person, allowing for the potential to predict outbreaks and even design vaccines.
  • 2020
  • 00:01:58
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 2 juil. 2020

The National Second wave of COVID-19 a ‘statistical certainty’: infectious disease expert

World-renowned infectious disease expert Dr. Gabriel Leung was among the first to predict the scale of the COVID-19 pandemic in January and he says the worst is far from over.
  • 2020
  • 00:07:19
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 29 juin 2020

BBC Documentaries Infested! Living with Parasites

Dr Michael Mosley explores the bizarre and fascinating world of parasites by turning his body into a living laboratory and deliberately infesting himself with them. He travels to Kenya to give himself a tapeworm – a parasite that can grow to many metres inside the human gut. He also encounters lice, leeches and the deadly malaria parasite, before swallowing a ...
  • 2014
  • 00:50:29
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 29 juin 2020

L’accès à ce contenu est réservé aux abonnés de BBC Channel.

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BBC Documentaries The Flu That Killed 50 Million

1918. As the Armistice bells ring out across the world to celebrate the end of the Great War, a silent killer makes its way home with the soldiers. The Spanish Flu will kill up to one third of the world’s population, more than both world wars combined. From the soldier who carried the virus to the Western Front, to the ...
  • 2018
  • 00:48:53
  • 15-17
  • Ajouté le: 26 juin 2020

L’accès à ce contenu est réservé aux abonnés de BBC Channel.

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Canadian Museum of Nature The Passenger Pigeon: A story of modern extinction

On September 1, 1914, the extinction of the passenger pigeon became official when the last of its species (a bird named Martha) died. Hear the story of how billions of birds became zero. Get a glimpse of a special exhibition in honour of the ill-fated passenger pigeon. See irreplaceable specimens from the Canadian Museum of Nature collection.
  • 2014
  • 00:03:08
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 23 juin 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Native mussels fight back

Find out how some native mussels are hanging on... despite the dire threat by invasive zebra mussels. Mussel expert André Martel takes us to the Rideau River in Smith Falls, Ontario.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:14
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 23 juin 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature Searching for lichens in Nova Scotia

Kejimkujik National Park in Nova Scotia is rich in lichen biodiversity. Tag along with lichenologist Troy McMullin as he finds an assortment of these miniscule marvels that are new to this park. See impressive close-up photos of the lichens as well.
  • 2017
  • 00:02:07
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 23 juin 2020

Canadian Museum of Nature National Biodiversity Cryobank of Canada: Frozen DNA

Learn about the National Biodiversity Cryobank of Canada. This new facility to support the study of species diversity is the first of its kind in Canada with a national mandate. It preserves frozen animal and plant tissues as well as associated genetic material.
  • 2018
  • 00:02:39
  • 13-14
  • Ajouté le: 23 juin 2020

Canadian Space Agency Five senses in space: Taste

In space, fluid distribution to the head can cause congestion, dulling the sense of taste. Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield shows us his personal favourite food that has a little extra kick to stir the taste buds.
  • 2013
  • 00:00:40
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 juin 2020

Canadian Space Agency Five senses in space: Hearing

In space, no one can hear you scream, but inside the International Space Station it's a whole other story. Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield describes what he hears every day, and shares a few sweet strands of his own sounds as well.
  • 2013
  • 00:01:00
  • 9-12
  • Ajouté le: 19 juin 2020